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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white┬ásuccessors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

Genealogy of Samuel Allen Family

S151 SAMUEL ALLEN: Came to America near the end of the eighteenth century from England, bringing his widowed mother, whose first name is unknown and who returned to England; remarried, gaining a surname that is also unknown. Samuel became a farmer near Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa. He was twice m. and had a large family. His ch. include: (1) Hetty, who m. a man by the name of Green, David, Yost and John, who was b. 1823, became a farmer and m. Mary Hocker. He served with the 13th regiment of Penna. Cavalry Volunteers for three years, enrolling in 1862. They had the following ch.: (A) Samuel d. y. (B) George: d. y. (C) Hettie: b. 1858; m. Charles Gelwicks and is still living at Franklin County, Pa. (D) Winfield Scott: b. 1861; m. Emma Schlicter; d. 1914. They had: (a) Nora and Ivan: who d. in infancy. (b) Mary Catherine: who m. Wm. Alleman. They reside at Shippensburg, Pa. (c) Blanche, Philadelphia. (d) Elva, Shippensburg. (e) Anna: m. Richard Kyle. They reside in Franklin County. (f) Paul: b....

Biography of Cyrus K. Holliday

Cyrus K. Holliday was one of the founders of Topeka, in which, for many years, he was the largest taxpayer; projected and built the first portion of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad; was one of the organizers of the republican party in Kansas, and an all-around promoter of great enterprises. Born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1826, he was educated for the legal profession, but decided in early manhood in favor of a business life. His first venture was the building of a short line of railroad in his native state, in which he accumulated some $20,000, which was the foundation of his success in later life. Deeming the West a better field for the exercise of his talents, he left Pennsylvania and in October, 1854, located at Lawrence. He took an active interest in the free-state cause and was the first president of the town company that laid out Topeka. An account of his work in connection with the founding of the great system of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, is thus given: “Mr Holliday’s greatest achievement was in projesting and building the first portion of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad. He was the first man to dream of a line of railway along the old Santa Fe trail to the Pacific coast. In 1864 he prepared a map showing the line of the proposed road and tried to interest capitalists in the scheme. Everywhere he was met by rebuffs and sneers, but nothing dauntod him, and he lived to see the realization of his dreams. He secured a charter from the Kansas...

William Davis of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

a152 WILLIAM DAVIS: m. Rebecca (?) and settled in Cumberland Co., Pa. Had with other issue (1) James D.: b. 1775; d. 1857; m. Susan McClintock. (A) William: b. 1801; m. Harriet Parr. (a) Elizabeth. (b) James: m. Emma McLaren. (c) Ruth D.: m. Willard Harsh. (d) William: b. 1861; m. Laura Stoody. 1. Paul S.: b. 1892; m. Edith Muncey. (e) John E. (f) Nancy: m. H. Aiken. Lives in Ohio. (2) George: b. 1777; m. Margaret McGuire; mem. of the first board of assoc. in Carroll Co., Ohio, 1832. One dau., Ruth, b. 1802. (3) David: b. 1778; m. Martha Freeman. (A) Evan: b. 1805; m. Sarah John. Ch. include Hiram and David. (B) William: b. 1807; d. 1877; m. Sarah Crochan. (a) David: d. y. (b) Evan: b. 1839; d. unm. (c) William: b. 1850. (d) Nathaniel: b. 1853; m. Nettie Hoover. (C) George: b. 1816; d. 1888; m. Mary Kail. (a) David: b. 1839; m. Margaret Pittenger. 1. Albert R.: b. 1865; m. Laura Gibson and had George, b. 1907. 2. John: b. 1870; m. Clara Myers. 3. Oliver: b. 1874; m. Mary Brower, and had a family. (b) Andrew J.: b. 1841; d. 1919; m. Mary Long. 1. George A.: b. 1864; m. Leona Vasbinder. Lives in Ohio. A. Dan.: b. 1900; d. y. B. James: b. 1902. C. Mary: b. 1908. (4) William D.: b. 1781; d. 1850; m. Mary McGuire. Ch. include: (A) James M.: b. 1814; m. Catherine Rogers. He is an attorney in Carrollton, O. There are three ch. (B) William: b. 1816; m. Calista Roby. Ch. include: (a) Senia,...

Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil war. Mr. Blue was wounded in the Battle of Rocky Gap, in Southwestern Virginia, promoted to second lieutenant for gallantry in action, and within a short time was commissioned captain. In one of the engagements he was captured and held as a prisoner of war at Libby prison and also at Danville, Va. The regiment was mounted and after the Salem raid was changed, by order of the secretary of war, to the Sixth West Virginia Cavalry. Its final service was in a campaign on the plains against the Indians at the close of the war. The regiment was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, so that Mr. Blue was in Kansas during the early ’60s. After his discharge from the army he returned to Virginia, taught school, read law and was admitted to the bar of that state in 1870. In 1871 he settled in Linn County, Kansas, but in 1898 he moved to Labette County, and finally located in Cherokee County. There he became a leading lawyer, serving...

Biography of Eames Dickey

Eames Dickey was born of Irish parents in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1788, came to the northwestern territory with his father’s family in 1798 and settled first in Washington county. When a young man Mr. Dickey was employed as a post rider to carry the mail on horseback, between Marietta and Chillicothe, a distance of about one hundred miles. Between 18o6 and 1814 he was variously engaged in the mail service, sometimes as a sub contractor, but always doing the riding of one hand himself. At that time the mail service in this section was one of great hardship and frequently of danger, as the numerous streams along the route, all destitute of bridges, were often swollen and had to be crossed at the peril of life. From 1812 to 1814, during the war with Great Britain, the great East and West mail was sent over this route, the bag being sometimes nearly filled with government dispatches alone. The riders (three in number), each made one round trip a week from Marietta to Chillicothe and return, regardless of weather and of all obstacles. Mr. Dickey once swam the creek near Amesville in the night, running great risk and getting the mail thoroughly wet. On reaching John Brown’s in Ames, one of his regular stopping places, he spent a short time drying the mail bag before the fire and then went on in the darkness. During the war the contract required the mail to be carried at the rate of five miles an hour, and the government enforced the condition rigorously. . Mr. Dickey became noted for his energy and...

Biography of Martin Mohler, Hon.

Kansas had always been a progressive state. Its history proves that. But progressiveness is a spiritual attitude and by its very nature its material environment is constantly changing. Thus it was as possible for progressiveness to exist and flourish twenty-five or thirty years ago when Kansas was beset by mortgages, whirlwinds and sod houses, as in the present era of comfortable substance and prosperity. Hence it is possible to refer to the late Martin Mohler’s distinction as one of the most progressive secretaries of the State Board of agriculture Kansas ever had without disparaging in any sense the accomplishment of his honored son, Jacob C. Mohler, who is the present secretary of the State Board of agriculture. Martin Mohler came to Kansas in the early days in 1871, and for three terms, six years, was secretary of the board of agriculture, from January, 1888, to January, 1894. In the fourteenth biennial report of the Kansas State Board of Agricultore is found an appropriate tribute to his life and its activities, written by a man who had known him practically ever since he came to Kansas, and from that article is adopted the following sketch for publication in the Standard History of Kansas. Martin Mohler was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1830, and died at Topeka, Kansas, March 20, 1903. During his boyhood he availed himself of every opportunity of securing an education, finally graduating from the Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, being one of the three members of the second graduating class of that institution. He then returned to Pennsylvania and engaged in teaching, it being his...

Biography of Henry C.Bear

Henry C. Bear is one of the oldest residents of Champaign County. He went from Macon County as a brave and gallant soldier into the Union Army during the Civil War, returned after the war with his wounds and gave his energy to agriculture until his health would permit following that no longer, and now for many years he has been engaged in the grain business at Penfield. His is a record that deserves more than passing mention. He was born at Mount Rock in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, a son of David and Maria (Yoter) Bear. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of Maryland. Henry C. was the oldest of their nine children and was fifteen years of age when the family came to Illinois, locating at Decatur in Macon County. Mr. Bear and his brothers and sisters were educated partly in Plainfield, Pennsylvania, and also in Illinois. On November 17, 1859, Mr. Bear married Miss Lucetta Jane Likins. She was born in Marion County, Ohio, a daughter of John and Sarah (Cole) Likins, also natives of Ohio. Mrs. Bear was likewise fifteen years of age when her parents came to Illinois. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bear located in Oakley Township in Macon County and were quietly engaged in the peaceful vocation of farming for several years. Not long after the war began Mr. Bear showed his practical patriotism by enlisting in Company A of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Illinois Infantry. He enlisted at Decatur, went south to Memphis, and was soon with General Sherman’s great armies operating around Vicksburg. Mr. Bear...

Biography of Samuel Brownlee Fisher

Samuel Brownlee Fisher of Parsons, consulting engineer of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad Company, is one of the eminent railway engineers of America. He had had nearly fifty years of active experience and had been identified with the construction of various railway lines in the West and East. He comes of an old Scotch family of Covenanter stock. On the maternal side his ancestors were the Brownlees, who were Covenanters in Scotland and were exiled because of their religious belief and settled in Pennsylvania. Mr. Fisher’s great-great-grandfather in the maternal line, George Wilie, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and another member of this same family was Colonel Thompson, an aide to General Washington. Mr. Fisher’s maternal grandfather, Samuel Brownlee, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and spent all his life on a farm in that rugged district of Southwestern Pennsylvania, dying in 1855. He was an active abolitionist in the days before the Civil war and was a member of the Associate Branch of the Presbyterian Church. Samuel Brownlee married Ann Wilie, who was born and died at Washington, Pennsylvania. The father of Mr. Fisher was Rev. Jacob P. Fisher, who was born in Ohio in 1808, but was reared and married in Washington, Pennsylvania. He was a minister of that branch of Presbyterianism formerly known as the Associate Church. He was also actively identified with the abolition cause. His death occurred in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1853. Rev. Mr. Fisher married Jane Thompson Brownlee, who was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1820. She died in 1888 while visiting in Montana, her home at that time...

Biography of Charles South

Charles South. The oil industry in the Mid-Continent field of Kansas had an able representative in the person of Charles South, of Chanute, who had been producing in this field since 1903. Like many of the men interested in the business here, Mr. South had his introduction to oil production in the Pennsylvania fields, and when he arrived in Kansas had a number of years of experience back of him to assist him in his enterprises. Mr. South was born near the City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, April 26, 1864, and is a son of John and Vilinda (Everly) South. He belongs to a family which traces its ancestry back to Cromwell’s time in England, when the family sided with King Charles, and which was founded in America during the days previous to the outbreak of the War of the American Revolution. Benjamin South, the great-grandfather of Charles South, was born in New Jersey, and went with his son Enoch to Greene County, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred. Enoch South, grandfather of Charles, was born in 1787, in New Jersey, subsequently became a pioneer of Western Pennsylvania, where he was an extensive land owner, and died in Greene County, that state, in 1863. The family had a fine Revolutionary record, the eight sons of the original emigrant (who was the great-great-great-grandfather of Charles South) having fought as soldiers of the Continental line, enlisting from the colony of New Jersey. John South was born in 1822, in Greene County, Pennsylvania. He was reared to manhood and educated in Greene County, and like his father became an extensive landholder, also building up...
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