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Queen Anne’s War – Indian Wars

War was declared against France by Queen Anne, of England, in May, 1702, and, of course, the contest was renewed in America. Villebon, the governor of Canada, immediately began to encroach upon the northern frontier of the British colonies, and to instigate the Indians to commence their destructive ravages. Dudley, the governor of Massachusetts, visited Casco, Maine, in June, 1703, and held a conference with a number of Indian chiefs, and concluded a treaty which the Indians promised to observe as long as the sun and moon should continue. Not withstanding these protestations, they made an attack a few weeks after upon all the settlements from Casco to Wells, killing and taking one hundred and thirty persons, and destroying all in their way. On the 17th of August, 1703, a party of Indians attacked Hampton village, killed five persons, and plundered two houses. This alarmed the neighboring country, and the Indians fled. In the fall, Colonel March, of Casco, attacked a party of the enemy, killing six and taking six prisoners. Hostilities were suspended during the winter. In the spring, Colonel Church, renowned as the conqueror of Metacomet, planned an expedition against the Indians in Maine, and sailed from Boston, with a number of small boats, in May. At Green Island, he took a number of prisoners, and at Penobscot, he took or killed every Indian or Frenchman who could be found. Among the captives was a daughter of Castein, whom they kindly treated, though her father had been such a bloody foe of New England. Thence they proceeded, and drove the French and Indians from Passamaquaddy. Sailing across...

King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

Biography of John Shackford Kimball

John Shackford Kimball was an enterprising lawyer of Boston and a business man of Burlington, Ia. A son of David and Abigail (Perkins) Kimball, Pembroke, N.H., April 28, 1812. His descent from Michael Kimball, who married Bettie Runnells, came through David Kimball of the second generation and David Kimball of the third, who married Abigail Perkins. The fifth generation is now represented by John Stevens Kimball. Mr. Kimball’s parents died at Pembroke when he was thirteen years old, leaving nine children-Betsey, Asa, Perkins, John Shackford, Abigail, Sarah Towle (widow of Timothy Colby, of Concord ), Joseph, Mary Lewis (widow of Samuel B. Wright, of Burlington, Ia. ), and Harriet. Of these Sarah and Mary are living. Mary, who was about five years old at the death of her parents, subsequently lived in the family made famous at that time by the noted Prescott murder. Perkins, after spending some time in the printing business, was later employed in the Boston custom-house, and then kept a store in partnership with J. Frank Hoyt in Concord. On retiring from business, he returned to Hopkinton, and died there December 15, 1876. He first married Lydia Reed Wilde, of Boston, a sister of Joseph Wilde, of the well-known firm of Lawrence, Wilde & Co., furniture dealers, Cornhill, Boston. His second marriage was made with Savalla Mason, of Grafton, N.H., who survived him with one daughter, Sarah Underwood Kimball. Mother and daughter are now residents of Hopkinton, the latter being the present librarian of the Hopkinton Free Library. When a young man, John Shackford Kimball went to Concord and worked in a bakery. Afterward he...

Biographical Sketch of Judge George H. Buck

Few names stand out more prominently in the history of California jurisprudence than that of George H. Buck, Superior Judge of San Mateo County, who is completing his twenty-fifth year on the bench and his thirty-third year in public office. As a jurist Judge Buck is one of the most eminent in the State. In addition to sitting on the San Mateo County bench, Judge Buck has been called many times to preside for other judges, and three years ago Governor Johnson appointed him to fill Judge Dooling’s unexpired term when he left the San Benito county court to become a Federal judge. Judge Buck entered public life in 1882, when he was elected District Attorney of San Mateo County. He was re-elected each term until 1890 when the citizens of San Mateo County elevated him to the Superior Bench. The best evidence of Judge Buck’s popularity and ability is the handsome majorities by which the voters have returned him to office at each election for Superior Judge since then. It was only last year that he was reelected at the primaries for a six-year term by a sweeping vote. Judge Buck was born in Maine in 1847. After completing his education, he had charge of Gorham’s Seminary and Academy in Maine. He later studied law in the office of Woodbury & Ingalls at Boston. He was admitted to the bar of Maine in 1871 and held the position of associate attorney of the Indianapolis, Cincinnatti and Lafayette Railroad until 1874, when he resigned to come to California. He moved to Redwood City where he started the practice of...

Biography of Chancey Adams, M.D.

Chancey Adams, M.D., a successful medical practitioner of Concord, was born in North New Portland, Me., March 15, 1861, son of Benjamin and Eliza Briton (Sawyer) Adams. He belongs to a branch of the famous old Massachusetts family of the same name. Henry Adams, the founder of the Massachusetts family, was an English emigrant, who came over to this country in the year 1630, with his eight sons, and settled in Braintree, in the Colony of Massachusetts. Of these eight sons, one subsequently returned to England. The names of the others, according to the records of Massachusetts, were: Peter, Henry, Thomas, Edward, Jonathan, Samuel, and Joseph. Samuel was the father of two sons, one of whom was Joseph Adams, who lived in North Chelmsford, Mass. Joseph was the father of Benjamin Adams, who was the father of William Adams, who was the father of Solomon Adams, who was the great-grand-father of Dr. Adams. Solomon Adams migrated from North Chelmsford, Mass., his native town, to Farmington, Me., at the close of the Revolutionary War. The record shows that he had served his country during that war from May 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780, in Captain James Varnum’s company, of Colonel Michael Jackson’s regiment; but his active military service actually extended beyond these dates. William Adams, son of Solomon and grandfather of Dr. Adams, was a native of Farmington, Me. He passed his entire life in that town, engaged in farming, and died June 12, 1862, at the age of seventy-three years. He married Nancy Hiscock, and had a numerous family of children, of whom three died in infancy. The...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, William

Allen, William, son of William Allen, was born at Brunswick, Cumberland County, Maine, March 31, 1822. He is a grandson of the Rev. Thomas Allen, the “fighting parson” of the noted Berkshire militia, who performed such conspicuous service under General Stark of Revolutionary fame. His father was a clergyman of Pittsfield, a scholar of eminence, and at one time president of Bowdoin College. After obtaining his preliminary education at the public schools, Mr. Allen fitted for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at the North Yarmouth Academy, in Maine, and entered Bowdoin College in 1834. After a few months spent at Bowdoin he went to Amherst, where he graduated in 1842. He began the study of law at the Yale law school, continuing it later at Northampton, where he was admitted to the bar in 1845, and where he has since resided. In 1880 Mr. Allen was made associate justice of the superior court, which high office he now holds, abundantly justifying the judicious selection of Governor Long, to whom he was indebted for the...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Stillman Boyd

Allen, Stillman Boyd, son of Horace O. and Elizabeth Allen, was born September 8, 1830, at Waterborough, New county, Maine. He received his education in the academies at North Yarmouth, Kennebunk and Alfred, Maine. In September 1853, he was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Maine until May, 1861, when he removed to Boston, and two years later became associated with the Hon. John D. Long, who subsequently retired from the firm upon his election as governor of the State. He is now the senior member of the law fir of Allen, Long & Hemenway (Governor Long since his retirement from congressional life having resumed his former relations). Mr. Allen has been largely engaged in jury trials, and has the reputation of winning for his clients the largest verdicts against railroads and other corporations ever rendered in this country. Mr. Allen was married at Kittery, Maine, September 7, 1854, to Harriet S., daughter of Joseph and Mary Seaward. Their children are: Willis Boyd Allen, who was a partner in his father’s firm for six years and has since been engaged in literary pursuits, and Marion Boyd Allen. In 1876-’77 Mr. Allen represented the city of Boston in the House of Representatives, serving the first year upon the judiciary committee. The following year he was chairman of the committee on probate and chancery. In 1877 he conducted an examination, made by the Legislature in to alleged abuses existing in the state reform school, which resulted in an entire change in the management of that institution. For three years Mr. Allen was president of the Mercantile Library Association of...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Horace G.

Allen, Horace G., son of Stephen M. Allen, was born at Jamaica Plain (Boston), July 27, 1855. His preparatory studies were pursued in the common schools. He was graduated L.L.B. from the Harvard law school in 1876; then became associated with Nathan Morse, Boston. He was admitted to the Suffolk bar in 1877. Later, he became law partner with Mr. Morse, under the firm name of Morse & Allen, with whom he still remains in practice of the law. Mr. Allen was married in Brunswick, Me, April 28, 1881, to Grace D., daughter of Gen. Joshua L. Chamberlain. Mr. Allen is a member of the Boston Art Club, Boston Athletic Association, and Curtis Club. In 1888 and ’89 he was elected a member of the Boston common council, and in the latter year, after a protracted contest, was chosen president of that body, January 11th. In this responsible position he has displayed marked ability, and has already acquired a reputation for tact and fairness greatly to his credit. His residence is in...

Biographical Sketch of Alden, Edmund Kimball

Alden, Edmund Kimball, son of Dr. Ebenezer and Anne (Kimball) Alden, was born in Randolph, Norfolk County, April 11, 1825. He is a lineal descendant in the eighth generation, by two family lines. Of “John” and “Priscilla” of Mayflower fame. After attending the Randolph Academy, he entered Amherst College, where he graduated in 1844; was then a teacher in the Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, for a year, and graduated from the Andover Theological Seminary in 1848, continuing his studies there for a few months as Abbott resident. From 1850 to 1854 Mr. Alden was pastor of the First Church of Yarmouth, Maine; was pastor of the Congregational church at Lenox, from 1854 to 1859; and then became pastor of Phillips Church, Boston, so continuing till 1876. He received from his alma mater, in 1866, the honorary degree of D. D. Mr. Alden was married April 25, 1850, to Maria, daughter of Deacon Gershom and Sarah (Hyde) Hyde, of Bath, Me. He was a trustee for fourteen years of Phillips Academy and the Andover Theological Seminary, resigning this trust in 1881; he has also been a trustee of Amherst College since 1873; he is at present corresponding secretary, home department, of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, having held the office for thirteen...

Biographical Sketch of Samuel N. Hawkes

Assistant attorney-general of Kansas with a residence at Topeka, Samuel N. Hawkes is one of the older members of the Kansas bar, and had been in active practice in various parts of the state for more than thirty years. He came to Kansas with a training and education received at one of the oldest eastern universities, and his career had been one of uninterrupted success and influential participation in the life of his own community and the state. He was born at Portland, Maine, May 8, 1861, a son of Charles M. and Susan A. (Whitney) Hawkes. His father, who was a wholesale shipper at Portland, up to 1870 and afterwards in the brokerage business there until 1875, moved his family in the latter year to New Haven, Connecticut, in order to educate his children. New Haven was his home the rest of his life. Reared in Portland, Maine, and New Haven, Connecticut, Samuel N. Hawkes followed his course in the common schools with preparatory work at Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, and in 1879 was matrioulated in Yale University. He graduated B. A. in 1883, and two years later received his law degree LL. B. from the same university. Shortly after his graduation he came to Kansas, and practiced at Topeka and Lincoln Center until 1887, when he established his home at Stockton. Mr. Hawkes still maintains an office in Stockton and was in active practices there until January, 1911, when he became assistant attorney-general of the state. For three terms he served as county attorney, and was also city attorney of Stockton. Politically he is a...
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