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Genealogy of Daniel Baker

Qa161 DANIEL BAKER: b. in England; m. Sarah Chase, 1740. Col. Jacob: reported to have served on General Washington’s staff, and at his death left an estate now reported to be worth about $800,000,000. Samuel: M.D.; b. 1742; m. Roda (Silliman) Weed, 1773. Isaac: M.D.; b. 1783, at Fairfield, Conn.; m. Susan Morgan Dodge (d. 1833); in 1804 Dr. Isaac surveyed, laid out and named the townsite of Bloomington, Ill.; was county surveyor, clerk of the court (held this office for fifteen years) ; served as postmaster for a great many years and was a much respected citizen; died at the age of 90 years, at the home of his son, LeRoy, Ill. Sidney Dodge: b. 1820; d. 1906, at Council Grove, Kansas; m. Laura A. Edwards, 1848. Frank W.: b. 1857, LeRoy, Ill.; m. Mary Hester Catherine Sherfey, 1878, at Bloomington, Ill.; now living at Anaheim, Calif. Emery Dodge: b. 1880, at Bloomington, Ill.; m. Cora May Kinkle; is a practicing physic;an and surgeon; now living in Spokane, Wash. Ch.: Catherine, Wooster and Emery, Jr. Fred Sherfey : b. 1884 at Rock Creek Ranch, Council Grove, Kansas; m. Alice Tedstone; now living in Ganado, Texas. Ch.: Rosalee and Theodore. Sidney Woods: b. 1885; m. Daisy Scribner; jeweler and optometrist; now living at Sheridan, Montana. Ch.: Frank. George Smith: b. 1887; m. Edna Bell; is an expert orange orchardist; now living at Anaheim, Calif. Ch.: Bernell and Barbara. Harry Edw ards: b. 1891; graduate optometrist and optician; m. Helen Vance; now living at Oakland, Calif. Solomon Frank: b. 1895; financial appraiser and realtor; m. Catherine Walker White, 1926; enlisted Signal Corps,...

Biography of Samuel N. Wood, Col.

Col. Samuel N. Wood, long a resident of Lawrence and a leader of the free-state party in Kansas, was prominent as one of the founders of the republican party, as a legislator in both houses, as an editor and one of the original stockholders of the Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. He was born at Mount Gilead. Ohio, December 30, 1825. the son of Quaker parents, from whom he imbibed his anti-slavery sentiments at an early age. In 1844, although too young to vote, he was chairman of the liberal party central committee of this county. Four years later be supported Martin Van Buren, the freesoil candidate for President, and he was conductor of one of the underground railways which passed near his house. He taught school, studied law and on June 6, 1854, two days after being admitted to the bar, he started for the Territory of Kansas. Early in July Mr. Wood located on a claim four miles west of Lawrence, and immediately became an acknowledged leader of the free-state party. He was one of the man who rescued Jacob Branson from Sheriff Jones, an act which brought on the Wakarusa war; was delegate to the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, convention which organized the republican party in 1856; to the Philadelphia convention of the same year, and to the Leavenworth constitutional convention in 1858. The following year he removed to Chase County; represented Chase, Morris and Madison counties in the Territorial Legislatures of 1860 and 1861; was a member of the first State Senate in 1861 and again in 1867; was a member of the House in 1864,...

Biography of Leonard R. Manley

The value of a useful trade, of making one’s energy count toward one thing, of forging steadily ahead, regardless of obstaeles and discouragements, finds emphatic expression in the life of Leonard R. Manley, president and manager of the Topeka Pure Milk Company, the largest concern dealing exclusively in milk in the State of Kansas. When Mr. Manley first came to Topeka, it was in a humble capacity, but he was a thorough master of his trade, and possessed the ambition, energy and ability to better and elevate himself, so that he had shapod his abilities to his needs, had made the most of his opportunities, and had finally taken his place among the leading business men of his adopted city. Mr. Manley was born at Nortonville, Jefferson County, Kansas, September 29, 1873, one of the five children born to George F. and Anna (Reed) Manley, natives respectively of Indiana and Missouri. His paternal grandfather was Garlington B. Manley, a native of Indiana, who took his family to Kansas in 1860 and located in Coffey County on a farm. The activities of the border ruffians in the period of the first year of the Civil war, however, caused him to give up his new home and moved, in 1862 to Leavenworth County, where he resided until 1885. In the latter year he went to Jefferson County, and there continued to reside until his death in 1892, The grandfather was a man of many sterling traits of character, was an industrious and successful farmer, and a citizen who was active in the affairs of his community. He was a democrat in...

Biographical Sketch of Thomas S. Huffaker

Thomas S. Huffaker, a pioneer Indian missionary among the Shawnees, a founder of Council Grove and an old-time republican leader, was born in Clay County, Missouri, March 30, 1825, a son of Rev. George Huffaker, who had come from Kentucky five years before. In 1849 he came to Kansas in connection with the manual training school for the Shawnee Indians at the mission in what is now Jefferson County, The following year he went to Council Grove, where he took charge of the Indian mission school which had been established on the Kaw reservation there by the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He remained at the head of this school until it was abandoned in 1854. On May 6, 1852, Mr. Huffaker married Miss Eliza A. Baker, who was born in Illinois in 1836. About the time the Indian mission school was abandoned, Mr. and Mrs. Huffaker organized a school for white children, which was probably the first institution of the kind in Kansas. Mr. Huffaker was one of the incorporators of the Council Grove Town Company; was the first postmaster at that point; was elected to the State Legislature in 1874 and 1879; was a regent of the State Normal School from 1864 to 1871; was frequently a delegate to republican conventions, and as late as May, 1906, was a member of the state convention of that party. Mr. Huffaker died on July 10,...

Biography of Warren S. Plummer

Warren S. Plummer, former county clerk of Pottawatomie County, is secretary, treasurer and manager of the Westmoreland Mercantile Company, the largest general merchandise house in business at the county seat. Mr. Plummer started life with an earnest purpose, and had steadily kept that in view and by industry and honorable dealings had attained a position where he is recognized as one of the leading men of his home county. He is a native of Pottawatomie County, having been born near the present Village of Flush, then known as Myers Valley, on January 7, 1875. He is of old American stock, the Plummers having come from England and settled in Virginia in Colonial times. His father Hezekiah Plummer was one of the early settlers in Pottawatomie County. He was born near Chillicothe, Ohio, in February, 1826, and when a boy entered upon an apprenticeship at the cooper and wagon making trade. He became a skilled workman. He was reared and married near Chillicothe and from there moved to Indiana. In 1862 he volunteered his services in Company I of the Thirtieth, Indiana Infantry, but after six months of service was discharged on account of disability. He then went back to Chillicothe, Ohio, and lived there until 1868, which was the date of his coming to Pottawatomie County. He took up a homestead, developed it as a farm, and sold out in 1878 and removed to Morris County, where he bought a new farm. He was a successful farmer and finally retired into Council Grove in 1887, where he died in January, 1899. Hezekiah Plummer was a republican and a member...

Biography of Charles F. White

Charles F. White. Although a resident of North Topeka only since the early part of 1916, Charles F. White had demonstrated within the year that he is a man of force and ability, and a promising acquisition to the agricultural life of the community. His entire career had been passed in Kansas and from the time he started life on his own account he had devoted himself to farming, so that he had the necessary experience and the thorough knowledge needed in the acquiring of a full measure of success in this fertile farming locality. Charles F, White was born at Council Grove, Morris County, Kansas, in 1877, and is a son of William and Harriet E. (Stevenson) White. His father was born near Lexington, Kentucky, in 1827, and at an early age was left an orphan and forced to make his own way in the world. He was but sixteen years of age when he went to Lexington, Missouri, and there secured a position as a clerk in a general store. For some years he followed merchandising in Missouri, but eventually Kansas called him and, in 1851, he arrived at Council Grove, being the second white man to locate at that place. The first was the noted Judge Huffaker, who had gone there some time previous to teach the Indians in the old mission, which still stands as a historic memento binding together the past and the present. After going to Council Grove, Mr. White turned his attention to farming, and subsequently lived on one place for a period of twenty-nine years. His life was one of hardships...

Biography of Edson Baxter

Edson Baxter. Now serving as clerk of the District Court at Marion, Captain Baxter is an old timer of Kansas and had lived in close touch with the developments of half a century and his own part therein allows him to speak with authority on the history of that period. The Baxter family came to Kansas in territorial times and did their pioneering in Morris County. Edson Baxter was fifteen years of age when he accompanied the family caravan overland, and he was able to make himself useful from the very beginning of the settlement. He was born on a farm in Lasalle County, Illinois, October 8, 1842, a son of June and Elizabeth (Lenox) Baxter. He is a descendant of the noted English divine, Richard Baxter. June Baxter, his father, was born near West Point, New York, June 30, 1805. In early life he learned the trade of blacksmith, and from New York went to Illinois. In 1858 he brought his family with wagons and teams westward from Central Illinois and located on land which he pre-empted in Morris County, Kansas. The rest of his active years were spent there as a farmer, and he died May 20, 1890. When the Baxter family settled in Morris County the settlers lived chiefly along the creeks. Law and order were not securely established, and besides some Indian seares the population suffered to some extent from the civil warfare then raging in Kansas and afterward extended through the entire country. Not infrequently the Baxters lived on buffalo meat, since buffalo were still numerous in the country. June Baxter was married in...

Biography of David Crawford Thoroman

David Crawford Thoroman. The first of his name to come to Kansas, the late David Crawford Thoroman was for many years engaged in school teaching and farming in Coffey and Osage counties, and is still remembered by the older residents as a man of upright character, possessed of a high sense of justice. His experiences during the Civil war had placed upon him the handicap of being weak physically, but his energetic spirit and industry helped him to overcome this in large part, and throughout his career he was a useful member of whatever community he made his home. David C. Thoroman was born in Adams County, Ohio, in 1824, of English descent, and when a young man went to Lewis County, in the northeastern part of Kentucky, where he was married to Katherine Murphy. Thus early he was a schoolteacher and agriculturist and was so engaged when the Civil war broke out. Mr. Thoroman enlisted in Company E, Twenty-second Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and had his baptism of fire in Cumberland Gap, where he took part in a severe engagement. Subsequently he was in the battles around Vicksburg, including Milliken’s Bend, Big Black River and the numerous encounters leading up to the surrender of the besieged city, and later took part in the engagement at Arkansas Post. Just prior to the Red River expedition under General Banks, in which his regiment took an active part, Mr. Thoroman was forced to resign, owing to the ill effects of a sunstroke. By that time he had been advanced to the rank of lieutenant, through bravery and faithful service, and had...

Biography of George Pierson Morehouse

George Pierson Morehouse has a place among the prominent and well known public men of Kansas due to an exceptional range of interests and activities. His life had touched agricultural and business affairs, and had bad its influence in the political, legal and literary life of the West. For many years he lived at Diamond Springs or Council Grove in Morris County, but at present resided in Topeka, though he still spends considerable time upon the large stock farm known as the old “Morehouse Ranche” at Diamond Springs, which he owned and upon which the family settled nearly fifty years ago. At that time, the Kansa or Kaw Indians were on their reservation nearby, and going back and forth to the great buffalo ranges only two days drive to the westward. Large herds of long-horned cattle were driven along the old Santa Fe trial and the Kaw Indian trail, guarded by the then simon-pure festive cow-boy; the only settlers were few, scattered and located along the watered and wooded streams; and the vast sea of luxuriant prairie grass between the water courses died unused and became the dangerous food for the conflagrations which annually swept over that region. Game also was very plentiful. Inured to the many rigors of frontier life of that period, George P. Morehonse grew to manhood and became expert as a hunter and horseman. Money procured from the sale of furs, skins and wolf pelts bought clothes, school books and other luxuries. The terms of the district school on Diamond Valley at that time were short and primitive, but with the required preparation, principally by...

Biography of James S. Adam

James S. Adam has been a prominent factor in business affairs at Dunlap for the past fifteen years, and is regarded as the banker of the village. He was born in Kirkentelloch, Scotland, March 12, 1870, a son of William and Mary Adam. The father was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1832, and brought his family to America in 1880, settling in White City, Kansas. From there he removed to Parkerville, in 1894, and lived there until his death, in 1896. He was a farmer and stockman. Ten years old when brought to this country, James S. Adam had his early training in the schools of Scotland, and then grew up on his father’s farm in Kansas until he was about eighteen. His first ambition was for railroad work, and becoming an operator he was stationed at various points along the line of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway, both in Oklahoma and Kansas. Since 1902 his home had been at Dunlap, where at first he was active as a merchant and is still largely interested in the leading general store. In 1905 he took the executive post of cashier in the Dunlap Farmers Bank and had since successfully managed the affairs of this institution. Mr. Adam is a democrat and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and belongs to the Kansas State Bankers’ Associations and the American Bankers’ Association. He is a trustee and steward in the Methodist Church. In 1894, In Council Grove, Kansas, Mr. Adam married Miss Annie...
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