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Biography of James L. Reat, M. D.

James Lee Reat, M. D., one of the most distinguished physicians and surgeons of Illinois, and who has been long and honorably connected with the professional and industrial interests of Douglas County, was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, January 26, 1824. The Reat ancestors are traced back to Scotland, where the name was pronounced in two syllables, with the accent on the last. Two brothers emigrated to this country during the war of the Revolution, one of whom espoused the cause of the rebels, the term by which the patriot colonies were then known, and served through that struggle with Washington’s forces. The other brother sided with the Tories, in consequence of which the two brothers became alienated and a total separation occurred between the two branches of the family. Dr. Reat is descended from the one who cast his fortunes with those of the patriots and who, after the war, settled in Frederick Town, Maryland. At this place James Reat (father) was born and subsequently found his way to Ohio, where he married Susanna Rogers, a Virginia lady, and with her settled in Fairfield County, Ohio. When our subject was five years old, his parents removed to Coles County, Illinois, where the father purchased a farm on which they resided for a time, then removed to Charleston and lived there up to the time of his death, in 1868. Dr. Reat’s early education was derived from the meager advantages offered the neighborhood schools of that day and later attendance at the seminary at Charleston. That institution was conducted under eminent professors and here Dr. Reat received a good...

Biographical Sketch of W. W. Pepper

W. W. Pepper, a popular lawyer and a successful young business man, was born on a farm seven miles south of Newman May 24, 1866, and is the eldest of seven children born to Dudley H. and Nancy Liston Pepper. His father was a native of Kentucky and resides at Oakland. Mr. Pepper received his early education in the public schools of Oakland and afterward took a three-years’ course in the University of Illinois in Champaign. After leaving the university he took a two-years’ law course at the Northwestern University at Evanston and was graduated with honor in 1893, shortly afterward being admitted to the bar. On June 28, 1890, Mr. Pepper married Miss Nora Hinds, of Hindsboro. In March, 1894, Mr. Pepper located in Newman and commenced the practice of law. He became at once deservedly popular and in May, 1895, was chosen city attorney, which office he filled with due honor until the expiration of his time. He was re-elected to the same office, but resigned to look after his other business. It can be truly said of him that he is a man peculiarly after his own style. He has no model and seeks after none, save that which is the creation of his own mind. Starting out in life as he did, without means, perseverance and energy constituted his only capital. He entered his profession with a determination to fully acquaint himself with the law and the rules of practice. This he has done. He has built up and now enjoys an extensive practice in all the courts of Douglas County. His splendid success is...

Biography of Oliver O. Hockett

Oliver O. Hockett, one of the younger members of the medical fraternity of Douglas County, and one of the leading men in the social, professional and educational life of Newman, was born in Paris, Edgar County, Illinois, March 2, 1866. He was graduated from the high school of Paris in 1882 and subsequently entered the state university at Champaign, where he remained for three years. He then took up the study of medicine with Dr. M. P. Smith, with whom he remained until he entered Chicago Hahnemann College, from which well known institution he was graduated in the class of 1880, and the following year he spent in the Hahnemann hospital. In March, 1890, he came to Newman and opened out in the general practice of medicine, and has succeeded far beyond his expectations. He is skilled and successful, and although having been in Newman but a few years, he enjoys one of the most extensive and lucrative practices in the County. He is a member of the Hahnemann Medical Society, contributes to the medical journals and keeps himself thoroughly in touch with the advancements being made in his profession. As a diagnostician in his profession, as well as in his judgment of human nature, he would pass muster in any community. Dr. Hockett is a son of Mahlon and Mary (Kimble) Hockett, natives of Vermilion and Edgar counties respectively. His father was a well-to-do carriage manufacturer, who has recently retired. During the war of the Rebellion he was first lieutenant of the First Missouri Volunteers. His grandfather Kimble walked from Ohio to Edgar County, and died in 1877...

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Hancock

W. H. Hancock, who is one of the most successful broom-corn brokers and business men of Tuscola, was born in Chicago, March 29, 1864, and is a son of W. S. and Sarah (Bell) Hancock. His father was born in Oxford, Ohio, and his mother in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. His father is now living a retired life in Chicago. W. H. Hancock was raised to manhood in Chicago and educated in the Cook County normal school. His first position of any importance was that of conductor on the Pullman car lines, and he continued as such for seven years, running over thirty-six different railroads. For seven years he was engaged in the broom-corn business with his father in Chicago. In January, 1895, he was married to Miss Tillie Brogan, a highly accomplished young lady of Muscatine, Iowa. They have two children, John Henry and May. In 1899 he associated himself in partnership with W. Avery Howard (a notice of whom is found elsewhere) in the broom-corn brokerage business with their office in Tuscola. The firm is one of the most active and responsible engaged in the business. During the last year they handled about fifteen hundred tons of broom corn. He and his wife stand high in the social circles of Tuscola, where they expect to make their future...

Biography of William Horlick, Jr.

It is too often true that successful business men seem to find no time for public affairs and lightly regard the duties and obligations of citizenship. A notable exception to this rule and one whose example is well worthy of emulation is that of William Horlick, Jr., who, while actively connected with the management and interests of the Horlick Malted Milk Company, has also found time and opportunity for co-operation in those plans and projects which have to do with the development and upbuilding of the community in which he lives. He was born in Chicago, in 1875, a son of William and Arabella Horlick, and after attending the public schools continued his studies in Racine College, which constituted his preliminary preparation for life’s practical and responsible duties. Soon afterward he began his life work as an assistant of his father in the development of the business known the world over under the name of the Horlick Malted Milk Company. Resuming his studies he spent several terms as a student of applied science, division of engineering, at King’s College, London, England, during 1898, 1899 and 1900, thus splendidly equipping himself for the further conduct of most extensive and important business interests. In 1900 William Horlick made an extended European tour, also visiting Egypt and the Holy Land, and soon after his return, as recognition of his industry, close application and resourcefulness in business, he was elected secretary of the Horlick Malted Milk Company, and to the duties of that position, manifold and intricate, he has since devoted his attention. Mr. Horlick is well known in fraternal circles in Racine,...

Biography of Adam Hance

Adam Hance was born in Coblin, a French province of Alsace, and, as usual with the people of that country, spoke both German and English. He came to America and settled near Germantown, Pa., in 1722, where he married a German lady, and raised a large family. His younger son, also named Adam, married a Miss Stoebuck, of Pennsylvania, in 1768, and settled in Montgomery County, Va. When the revolutionary war began, fired by the prevailing patriotic feelings of the day, he joined the American army under Washington, and served during the entire war. He was in the battles of Brandywine, Yorktown, and several others, and experienced a great deal of very hard service. He had six children, viz. Henry, Peter, Martha A., Priscilla, William, and John. Henry was Sheriff of his native County for a number of years, and afterward became a successful merchant in Newburn, N. C. Peter was married first to Elizabeth Harper, of Virginia, by whom he had Mary, Anna, Margaret, Sabrina, William, and James. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs. Juliet Hewett, whose first husband was drowned in Kentucky about 1815. By her he had Robert, Elizabeth, Harvey, and Juliet. Mr. Hance settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1829, on what is now the Devault place. (Children of Peter Hance.) Mary never married, and died in Virginia at the age of sixty years. Sabrina married Isaac C. Bratton, of Virginia, who settled in Greenville, Tennessee, in 1831, and while living there had a suit of clothes made by Andrew Johnsen, who afterward became President of the United States. Mr. Bratton...

Biographical Sketch of John Randolph Allen

John Randolph Allen a pioneer of Tennessee was the father John Randolph Allen, born in 1836. Married in 1876, Nora Martin, born in 1858, they were natives of Tennessee. John Randolph and Nora (Martin) Allen were the parents of John Randolph Allen, born February 1877 in Chicago, Illinois. Married at Fort Smith, Arkansas December 25, 1916, Lulu, daughter of George and Mary Vaughn, born May 8, 1892 in Arkansas City, Kansas. Mr. Allen organized and directed the first elusively Indian agricultural and art fair among the Seminole and Creek Indians at Wetumka, Hughes...

Slave Narrative of John Eubanks & Family

Interviewer: Archie Koritz Person Interviewed: John Eubanks Location: Gary, Indiana Place of Birth: Barren County, Kentucky Date of Birth: June 6, 1836 Age: 98 Archie Koritz, Field Worker Federal Writers’ Project Lake County-District #1 Gary, Indiana EX-SLAVES JOHN EUBANKS & FAMILY Gary, Indiana Gary’s only surviving Civil War veteran was born a slave in Barren County, Kentucky, June 6, 1836. His father was a mulatto and a free negro. His mother was a slave on the Everrett plantation and his grandparents ware full-blooded African negroes. As a child he began work as soon as possible and was put to work hoeing and picking cotton and any other odd jobs that would keep him busy. He was one of a family of several children, and is the sole survivor, a brother living in Indianapolis, having died there in 1935. Following the custom of the south, when the children of the Everrett family grew up, they married and slaves were given them for wedding presents. John was given to a daughter who married a man of the name of Eubanks, hence his name, John Eubanks. John was one of the more fortunate slaves in that his mistress and master were kind and they were in a state divided on the question of slavery. They favored the north. The rest of the children were given to other members of the Everrett family upon their marriage or sold down the river and never saw one another until after the close of the Civil War. Shortly after the beginning of the Civil War, when the north seemed to be losing, someone conceived the idea...

Slave Narrative of Joe Robinson

Interviewer: Anna Pritchett Person Interviewed: Joe Robinson Location: Indiana Place of Birth: Mason County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1854 Place of Residence: 1132 Cornell Avenue Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE JOE ROBINSON-EX-SLAVE 1132 Cornell Avenue Joe Robinson was born in Mason County, Kentucky in 1854. His master, Gus Hargill, was very kind to him and all his slaves. He owned a large farm and raised every kind of vegetation. He always gave his slaves plenty to eat. They never had to steal food. He said his slaves had worked hard to permit him to have plenty, therefore they should have their share. Joe, his mother, a brother, and a sister were all on the same plantation. They were never sold, lived with the same master until they were set free. Joe’s father was owned by Rube Black, who was very cruel to his slaves, beat them severely for the least offense. One day he tried to beat Joe’s father, who was a large strong man; he resisted his master and tried to kill him. After that he never tried to whip him again. However, at the first opportunity, Rube sold him. The Robinson family learned the father had been sold to someone down in Louisiana. They never heard from, or of him, again. Interviewer’s Comment Mr. Robinson lives with his wife; he receives a pension, which he said was barely enough for them to live on, and hoped it would be increased. He attends one of the W.P.A. classes, trying to learn to read and write. They have...

Biography of Col. Thomas W. Scudder

Few of the Kansas territorial pioneers are still living. One of them is Col. Thomas W. Scudder, of Topeka. Colonel Scudder made a splendid record as a soldier with the fighting columns of the First Kansas Cavalry during the Civil war. He also had many interesting experiences in the border warfare in 1857. Much of his Kansas experience was on a pre-emption claim of 103 acres, the place where he now lives, before the war in Shawnes County, and he has long been a resident of Topeka, where he has enjoyed the association and friendship of many prominent men. He is of very old and prominent American stock. He was born on Long Island in New York State, September 15, 1834, and is now in his eighty-third year. His father was Thomas Scudder, and the ancestry before him contains four successive Thomas Scudders. The Scudders were of English origin and coming to America in colonial days settled in Boston and afterwards moved to Long Island, New York, where members of the family established the Town of Huntington under charter from King William and Queen Mary. Many of the early Scudders were sailors, but now for many generations have been chiefly land owners and identifled with agricultural pursuits. The most numerous branches of the family are still found in the Eastern states. Thomas W. Scudder grew up on Long Island, received a common school education, and also attended the old Huntington Academy. The experience which more than anything else had bearing upon his future destiny was his early employment in the store of Jacob Willits. When Mr. Willits came out...
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