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Biography of William Alfred Clark, A. M., M. D.

It is seldom that one attains prominence along several lines, but Dr. William Alfred Clark of Jefferson City is regarded as one of the eminent surgeons of the state and in 1918 served as president of the Missouri state board of health, while in Masonic circles he has also been accorded a place of distinction and leadership, having been grand master of the order in Missouri in 1917 and 1918. He is numbered among Missouri’s native sons, his birth having occurred in Clarksburg, Moniteau county, September 11, 1865. He was the eldest of ten children, four sons and six daughters. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish but when they migrated to America is not definitely known. The first authentic knowledge concerning their residence in this country is that they went to Kentucky from Guilford Court House, North Carolina, and in 1833, the grandfather of Dr. Clark left Logan county, Kentucky, and drove across the country in an ox wagon, settling in Moniteau county, Missouri. He took up his abode on the broad prairie where the village of Clarksburg now stands and the town was named in his honor. The doctor’s father, George T. Clark, was born in Kentucky in 1830 and passed away about 1893. He lived most of his life in Clarksburg and married Mary B. Yancey, a descendant of Leighton Yancey, who migrated from Virginia to Missouri and was one of the pioneer settlers of Howard county, his farm being the location of the town of Roanoke. A number of the family still live in that locality, and others are near Armstrong and in that vicinity. The village of...

Biography of Cortez F. Enloe, M.D.

Dr. Cortez F. Enloe, a man of strong personality who has been a leader in the public life of Jefferson City for many years and who is numbered among the substantial citizens as well as among the successful physicians of this part of the state, was born in Clarksburg, Missouri, January 28, 1881, his parents being James and Mary (Ryan) Enloe, who were also natives of Missouri. The father was a school teacher in early life but afterward became a merchant and at all times took a deep interest in public affairs, especially in the welfare and improvement o1 the schools. He was for many years county superintendent of schools after he had discontinued teaching. He served in the Civil war as captain of Company F of the Ninth Regiment of provisional Enrolled ‘Militia in 1863. The records in the adjutant general’s office read as follows: “James Enloe, 27th August, 1862, second lieutenant Company B, Forty-second Regiment Missouri Militia-1863. Promoted to Captain Company B, Forty-second Enrolled Missouri Militia, August 20, 1864.” Dr. Enloe obtained a high school education at Versailles, Morgan county, Missouri, but did not graduate and after leaving that institution he became a student in Vanderbilt University of Nashville, Tennessee, where he pursued his medical course, being numbered among the alumni of that institution of 1901, at which time the M. D. degree was conferred upon him. Immediately afterward he began practice in Greenville, Wayne county, Missouri, but remained there for only a few months. He then came to Jefferson City and since 1901 has been engaged in general practice here. While he still continues in general...

Biography of George L. Atkeson

George L. Atkeson. To those parents who value the intellectual development of their children, it is a matter of vital importance that in the early and formative period of their lives, their instructors in the public schools should be thoroughly qualified for such responsibility in scholarly attainments and in personal character. In securing so widely known and so experienced an educator as George L. Atkeson as superintendent of their city schools, the good people of Altoona, Kansas, displayed exceptional wisdom. Intelligent public opinion here, as at other points, makes more insistent demands, asks for more decided results than in old days, a realization having come that the needs of future generations must not be imperiled by any narrowing of public school education in the present. A wider and deeper service is demanded than ever before, and to this field of effort a welcome is given the able, the understanding, the progressive educational leader, a worthy example of this class being found in George L. Atkeson. He is a native of Missouri, born near Tipton, in Morgan County, September 20, 1866. His parents were Francis M. and Mary A. (Frye) Atkeson. Francis M. Atkeson was born in 1830, near Charleston in Kanawha County, West Virginia, in which section the early ancestors of the family had settled after coming from England. His father, Andrew Atkeson, was also born in what is now West Virginia, and from there, probably in 1832, removed with his family to Morgan County, Missouri. He became a farmer there and operated the first blacksmith shop in Tipton. Practically Francis M. Atkeson spent his entire life near Tipton,...

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