Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Native American History of Cherokee County, Georgia

Cherokee County located in northern Georgia. It is part of the Atlanta Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA.) Its county seat is Canton. It is named after the Cherokee Indians. Cherokee County is bordered on the north by Pickens County and the northeast by Dawson County. Forsyth County adjoins Cherokee on its eastern side. The section of Fulton County that was formerly Milton County forms its southeastern boundary, while Cobb County forms its southern boundary. Bartow County forms most of its western boundary, while Gordon County forms a short section of Cherokee’s Geology and hydrology Cherokee County is located in the Upper Piedmont, Blue Ridge foothills and Pine Log Mountains geological regions. The first two regions are characterized by underlying rock strata of igneous and metamorphicized igneous rock. The Pine Log Mountains are the result of an ancient geological boundary known as the Cartersville Fault. Extremely ancient rocks were pushed up through the fault when a section of a continental plate that was part of Africa collided with the North American plate. That section of the North American plate was covered with sedentary rocks. The Pine Log Mountains contain many minerals and semi-precious stones. In the late 1800s and early 1900s iron ore was mined commercially. Mines for semi-precious stones continued operation until the late 20th century. The Pine Log Mountains consist of small to medium height peaks reaching up to about 2,300 feet above sea level. The terrain of the remainder of the county generally consists of rolling hills and valleys or ravines formed by streams. There is a gorge about 200 feet deep created by the Etowah River...

Biography of Chester Lee Hill, M.D.

The medical fraternity of Haskell finds a prominent representative in Dr. Chester Lee Hill, who is an exponent of all that is highest, best and most advanced in the, practice of medicine and surgery, and of all that is most worthy and honorable in his relations toward his fellowmen. He was born in Canton, Cherokee county, Georgia, May 1, 1876, and is a son of Andrew H. and Maria (Phillips) Hill, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of South Carolina. The father was one of the early planters of Georgia, becoming the owner of fourteen hundred acres of land, and he also operated saw and flour mills, a cotton gin and a wool carder. He was a veteran of the Civil war, serving throughout the entire period of hostilities as a first lieutenant in the Confederate army. He participated in many heavy engagements, being present at the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge and being wounded in action. His business interests were wisely and successfully managed and he passed away in August, 1912, at the age of seventy-nine, while the mother’s demise had occurred in November, 1907, when she was seventy-four years of age. In the acquirement of an education Dr. Hill attended the grammar and high schools of Ball Ground, Georgia, and Emory College at Oxford, that state, after which he devoted two years to teaching, becoming principal of the Sharpe Mountain high school. He then entered the old University of Nashville, Tennessee, where he spent two terms as a medical student, completing his professional course in Grant University at Chattanooga, Tennessee, from which...

Biography of Hon. Byron Waters

Hon. Byron Waters.-Not a few of the persons who have so stamped their individuality upon their age and shaped the great events of their time that their names are inseparably interwoven in history, and whose lives and deeds stand out as milestones making the march of the world’s progress, are self-made men. These characters, by their inherent strength, indomitable will, resistless energy and persistent industry, surmount obstacles and overcome opposition that would dishearten and crush lesser spirits and rise to the summit of human attainment. In this struggling with adversity are developed a power of mind and fertility of resource which make them intellectual athletes in the arena of personal endeavor and enable them to outstrip their fellows reared amid more favorable surroundings. To this class belongs the subject of this memoir. He was born at Canton, Cherokee County, Georgia, in June, 1849; and in his veins is mingled the best blood of the empire States of the North and the South, his father having been a native of New York and his mother of Georgia. While yet in his teens young Waters experienced the horrors incident to the most gigantic civil war of modern times, and felt the devastating effects of Sherman’s victorious invading army on his memorable march to the sea. In 1867 Mr. Waters came to California and lived for a time with his uncle, the late James Waters, Sr., on his ranch in Old San Bernardino. Deciding to enter the legal profession, he commenced the study of law in April 1869, in the office of Judge H. C. Rolfe, and subsequently continued his studies with...

Pin It on Pinterest