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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, all over this continent, but which to them, was as the tones of an alarm-bell at midnight. And one hundred and twenty-three years have passed since our forefathers declared all men of every nationality to be free and equal on the soil of the North American continent then under their jurisdiction, except the Africans whom they held in slavery, and the Native Americans against whom they decreed absolute extermination because they could not also enslave them; to prove which, they at once began to hold out flattering-inducements to the so-called oppressed people of all climes under the sun, to come to free America and assist them to oppress and kill off the Native Americans and in partnership take their lands and country, as this was more in accordance with their lust of wealth and speedy self-aggrandizement than the imagined slow process of educating, civilizing and Christianizing them, a work too con descending, too humiliating; and to demonstrate that it has been a grand and glorious success, we now point with vaunting pride and haughty satisfaction to our broad and far extended landed possessions as indisputable evidence of our just claims to the resolution passed by our pilgrim ancestors, “We are the children of the Lord”; and to the little remnant of hapless, helpless and...

Genealogy of Samuel Allen Family

S151 SAMUEL ALLEN: Came to America near the end of the eighteenth century from England, bringing his widowed mother, whose first name is unknown and who returned to England; remarried, gaining a surname that is also unknown. Samuel became a farmer near Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pa. He was twice m. and had a large family. His ch. include: (1) Hetty, who m. a man by the name of Green, David, Yost and John, who was b. 1823, became a farmer and m. Mary Hocker. He served with the 13th regiment of Penna. Cavalry Volunteers for three years, enrolling in 1862. They had the following ch.: (A) Samuel d. y. (B) George: d. y. (C) Hettie: b. 1858; m. Charles Gelwicks and is still living at Franklin County, Pa. (D) Winfield Scott: b. 1861; m. Emma Schlicter; d. 1914. They had: (a) Nora and Ivan: who d. in infancy. (b) Mary Catherine: who m. Wm. Alleman. They reside at Shippensburg, Pa. (c) Blanche, Philadelphia. (d) Elva, Shippensburg. (e) Anna: m. Richard Kyle. They reside in Franklin County. (f) Paul: b....

Biography of Cyrus K. Holliday

Cyrus K. Holliday was one of the founders of Topeka, in which, for many years, he was the largest taxpayer; projected and built the first portion of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad; was one of the organizers of the republican party in Kansas, and an all-around promoter of great enterprises. Born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1826, he was educated for the legal profession, but decided in early manhood in favor of a business life. His first venture was the building of a short line of railroad in his native state, in which he accumulated some $20,000, which was the foundation of his success in later life. Deeming the West a better field for the exercise of his talents, he left Pennsylvania and in October, 1854, located at Lawrence. He took an active interest in the free-state cause and was the first president of the town company that laid out Topeka. An account of his work in connection with the founding of the great system of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, is thus given: “Mr Holliday’s greatest achievement was in projesting and building the first portion of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad. He was the first man to dream of a line of railway along the old Santa Fe trail to the Pacific coast. In 1864 he prepared a map showing the line of the proposed road and tried to interest capitalists in the scheme. Everywhere he was met by rebuffs and sneers, but nothing dauntod him, and he lived to see the realization of his dreams. He secured a charter from the Kansas...

Biography of Eames Dickey

Eames Dickey was born of Irish parents in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, September 3, 1788, came to the northwestern territory with his father’s family in 1798 and settled first in Washington county. When a young man Mr. Dickey was employed as a post rider to carry the mail on horseback, between Marietta and Chillicothe, a distance of about one hundred miles. Between 18o6 and 1814 he was variously engaged in the mail service, sometimes as a sub contractor, but always doing the riding of one hand himself. At that time the mail service in this section was one of great hardship and frequently of danger, as the numerous streams along the route, all destitute of bridges, were often swollen and had to be crossed at the peril of life. From 1812 to 1814, during the war with Great Britain, the great East and West mail was sent over this route, the bag being sometimes nearly filled with government dispatches alone. The riders (three in number), each made one round trip a week from Marietta to Chillicothe and return, regardless of weather and of all obstacles. Mr. Dickey once swam the creek near Amesville in the night, running great risk and getting the mail thoroughly wet. On reaching John Brown’s in Ames, one of his regular stopping places, he spent a short time drying the mail bag before the fire and then went on in the darkness. During the war the contract required the mail to be carried at the rate of five miles an hour, and the government enforced the condition rigorously. . Mr. Dickey became noted for his energy and...

Biography of Dr. William Plunkett

Esther, daughter of John Harris, married Dr. William Plunkett, who was born in Ireland of noble family. In personal appearance he is described as of large stature, great muscular development and strength, while an imperious disposition was among his distinguishing mental traits. This is attested by several occurrences in his career which yet retain a place in the traditions of the locality which he afterward lived in Pennsylvania. On one occasion with several boon companions, he was engaged in some hilarious proceedings at an Irish inn. The adjoining room was occupied by an English nobleman, who had a curious and valuable watch, which he sent to Plunkett with a wager that he could not tell the time by it. Dr. Plunkett put the watch in his pocket and sent a message to the Englishman that he should call upon him in person if he wished to know the time, but the Englishman never called and it is said that Plunkett kept the watch to the end of his life. Afterward he became involved in an assault on an English officer who was seriously injured and he was smuggled on board a vessel in a barrel or hogshead and thus came to America. He located at Carlisle, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, then on the western frontier, and he lived there during the French and Indian war, in which he was commissioned a lieutenant of the Fort Augusta Regiment of Northumberland county, and for his services received a grant of several hundred acres of land on the west branch of the Susquehanna river. To his property he gave the name of Soldiers’...

Biography of Jeremiah L. Seitz

Jeremiah L. Seitz is one of the pioneers of McPherson County. He came to Kansas a short time after the close of the Civil war, in which he had served as one of the youngest volunteers on the Union side. As a homesteader, farmer, public official and business man he had played a worthy and influential role in McPherson County since pioneer days. He is still active and had a good business as a collecting agent and auctioneer. Mr. Seitz was born April 16, 1847, at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob and Barbara (Shellebarger) Seitz. His parents were natives of Germany and came to America when quite young. His father came over in 1831. The father was born in 1812 and the mother in 1814. They were married at Decatur, Illinois, in 1839. Jacob Seitz, who followed the business of merchant tailor, permanently located at Decatur in 1857, and lived there half a century, until his death, October 14, 1907. The mother died at Decatur September 20, 1876. There were five children, four sons and one daughter. John, the oldest, born in 1840, was a private soldier in Company B of the Eighth Illinois Infantry and was killed in battle at Fort Donelson in 1862. David W., the second in age, was born in May, 1842, and is now a veterinary surgeon and stock man at Bement, Illinois. Daniel, born in July, 1844, combines farming with his duties as preacher in the United Brethren Church at Oakley, Illinois. The next in age is Jeremiah L. William, the youngest, was born in July, 1849, and is a farmer at Hammond,...
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