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Biographical Sketch of Noble L. Prentis

Noble L. Prentis, a leading Kansas editor for twenty-one years, and for the last decade of his life identified with the Kansas City Star, was born on April 8, 1839, in a log cabin three miles from Mount Sterling, Brown County, Illinois. His parents were natives of Vermont, descended from English settlers, and on both sides of the family came of brave Revolutionary stock. His parents died at Warsaw, Illinois, of cholera during the epidemic of 1849, leaving him an orphan at the age of ten years. He went to live with an uncle in Vermont and remained there until he was eighteen, when he moved to Connecticut and served an apprenticeship at the printer’s trade. He then came west and worked for a time in a newspaper office at Carthage, Illinois. At the opening of the Civil war he enlisted as a private in the Sixteenth Illinois Infantry and served four years, when he was honorably discharged. He published a paper at Alexandria, Missouri, until Capt. Henry King of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat induced him to come to Topeka in 1869 and assist him on the Record. During the succeeding eight years he was engaged on the Junction City Union and the Topeka Commonwealth, and about 1877 began to work on the Atchison Champion. He remained with that paper during Colonel Martin’s term as governor and in 1888 took charge of the Newton Republican. In 1890 he accepted a position on the editorial staff of the Kansas City Star, which he held until his death. In 1877 he went to Europe, and his book, “A Kansan Abroad,” was...

Biography of Nathan T. Veatch

Nathan T. Veatch has beenĀ superintendentĀ of the city schools of Atchison since 1901. He is a veteran educator, and was teacher, principal or superintendent for a number of years before he came to Kansas. A native of Illinois, he was born on a farm near Astoria in Fulton County February 25, 1852, grew up in Schuyler County, attended the public schools, and had been teaching almost continuously since 1879. He taught his first term in Schuyler County, Illinois. In 1881 he was graduated from the Illinois Normal University at Normal. Mr. Veatch taught in Brown County, Illinois, was principal of a ward school at Little Rock, Arkansas, four years, and for fourteen years was superintendent of schools at Rushville. Then in 1901 he accepted the call to Atchison and had since been head of the school system of that city. Superintendent Veatch had under his management seven schools, a staff of seventy teachers, and about 2,200 scholars. His ancestors were English and Scotch who came from the North of England in Colonial times, locating in Delaware and Maryland. His grandfather, Nathan Veatch, was born in Indiana, and married Elizabeth Evans, for whose family the City of Evansville, Indiana, was named. Nathan Veatch was a farmer and a pioneer settler at Astoria, Illinois, but his declining years were spent with his son B. M. Veatch at Keytesville, Missouri, where he died. In politics he was a whig. He and his wife had the following children: B. M. Veatch, who served as a captain in the Union army during the Civil war and afterwards engaged in the real estate business at Keytesville,...

Biography of James R. Gristy

James R. Gristy, of Emporia, is one of the real old timers of Kansas. Half a century ago he was engaged in farming and stock raising on a large scale in Johnson County. For many years he had been a successful real estate operator, and had enjoyed prominence in a business and civic way not only in Kansas but in Oklahoma and in other western states. Born in Brown County, Illinois, August 31, 1841, he grew up in that section, gained a public school education, graduating from the high school at Rushville, Illinois, in 1863. His first experiences led him into merchandising, and he spent four years at Mounds, Illinois. In the fall of 1866 he came to Kansas with his father, and in the neighborhood of Spring Hill they acquired 360 acres of land, and subsequently increased their holdings until they owned 1,200 acres. This they operated as a large farm and stock ranch for a number of years. In 1879, the father having retired, they both removed to Kansas City, where James R. Gristy established an office and built up an extensive business in real estate. In 1892 he left Kansas City and moved to the territory of Oklahoma, acquiring a large amount of land at Miami, and in many ways helped to promote that young town, which when he went there had less than fifty population. His home was in that section of Oklahoma until 1910. Mr. Gristy then removed to Spokane, Washington, and soon afterwards to Govan, Washington, where for two years he was engaged in raising wheat on a large scale. He then returned...

Biography of Benjamin C. Bond, Hon.

Hon. Benjamin C. Bond. In the public service that frequently crowns the career of men of personal high standing in a community, very often is shown a great capacity for public usefulness that the opportunity presents. In electing Benjamin C. Bond, an honored citizen of Buffalo, Kansas, cashier of the State Bank of Buffalo, to the State Legislature, the people of Wilson County gave evidence of wise discrimination and intelligent judgment. Not only is Mr. Bond an exact business man, with those habits of mind that assure investigation and accurate decision concerning the important measures brought before the legislative assembly, but he is also a man whose life had ever been marked with unselfish devotion to duty and to fearless championship of causes he had believed to be just. Benjamin C. Bond was born April 21, 1878, at Mount Sterling, in Brown County, Illinois. His parents were John A. and Parthenia (Bush) Bond. One of the very earliest settlers in Brown County, Illinois, was Rev. Granville Bond, a Methodist preacher, a faithful pioneer in the cause of religion. He was the founder of the family at Mount Sterling and was the great-grandfather of Hon. Benjamin C. Bond, of Buffalo, Kansas. His son, Benjamin Bond, was born in the circuit rider’s cabin at Mount Sterling which he built after emigrating from Kentucky, and Benjamin became a farmer and doubtless was prosperous on the rich soil of Illinois, until the outbreak of Civil war led him to join with his loyal neighbors, in the effort to preserve the Union. He died in the army during the progress of the war. John...

Biography of Milton Canterbury, M. D.

Milton Canterbury, M. D., of Redlands, was born in Greenup County, Kentucky. His father, Reuben Canterbury, a farmer, was born in North Carolina. The name originated in Kent County, England, from the estate of a man by that name, and for whom the city of Canterbury was named. Reuben Canterbury married Miss Elizabeth Lycaas, a native of Kentucky. The union was blessed with thirteen children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eighth. He first attended the common schools of his native county and afterward attended a short time the college at Marietta, Ohio. From there he went to Missouri and took a course at Marion College. He then attended the Medical College of Ohio, and graduated in 1863 from the University of Iowa. After his graduation he practiced medicine for two years in Brown County, Illinois. In 1865 he went to Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon, where he practiced four years, and then practiced one year at Dallas, Polk County, Oregon. From the latter place he moved to California, where he has been a practicing physician most of the time for ten years. On account of declining health he bought a ranch of 160 acres, six miles northeast of San Bernardino, on which he lived until January 1, 1889, when he established the drug store in Redlands. He is now located in the Young Men’s Christian Association building on State street, and is giving his whole attention to the drug business. Dr. Canterbury was married in 1845 to Sarah Wood, of Zanesville, Ohio, and they have had ten children, five of whom are still living, viz.: James...

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