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Biography of Edmund Silver

Edmund Silver, a thriving farmer of Boscawen, N.H., was born in Bow, this State, September 10, 1834. His parents, Edmund and Sallie (Dow) Silver, who resided in Bow for the greater part of their lives, died when their son Edmund was quite young. They had nine children-Lewis, Laura, Cyrene, Leonard, Gideon, Sullivan, Daniel, Edmund, and George. Lewis died in March, 1897. Daniel is engaged in farming in Salisbury, N.H. George is in Penacook; and the others, except Edmund, the subject of our sketch, are deceased. Edmund Silver received his education in the district schools, remaining at home with his parents until he was seven years of age. He then went to Ware, Mass., where he was employed on a farm; and he was similarly engaged in other towns for a few years, returning subsequently to Bow. At the age of twenty he went to Canterbury, remaining there three and a half years. He then spent three years in Warner, N.H., afterward removing to Webster, in which place he was engaged in farming for about thirty-five years. Subsequently, coming to Boscawen, he purchased his present farm, then known as the Ferrin farm. It contains about sixty-five acres, most of which is under cultivation. Besides general farming he carries on a milk business. He also owns the farm at Webster where he formerly lived, which contains forty-five acres. On November 2, 1858, Mr. Silver married Lydia Ann Kimball, of Albany, N.Y., who was born March 9, 1834, a daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Hubbard) Kimball. Her father was a native of Hopkinton, and her mother of Wilmot, N.H. The former was...

Biography of Abraham Gates Jones

Abraham Gates Jones, a wellknown gentleman of Concord, N.H., formerly engaged in the printing business, but now retired from active business affairs, was born in the town of Bow, five miles south of this city, October 21, 1827, son of Philip and Sarah M. (Gates) Jones. His paternal ancestors for many years were residents of Merrimack County, while the maternal progenitors came from Massachusetts. Philip Jones, father of the subject of this sketch, was the son of Joseph Jones, and was a merchant in Hookset. He died on January 26, 1836. His wife, Sarah M. Gates, was a daughter of the Rev. Abraham Gates, a clergyman, who came to New Hampshire from Massachusetts, and after staying a short time in Claremont settled at Bow, where he bought a farm, the same on which his grandson and namesake was born. Abraham G. Jones was left fatherless at the early age of eight years. In 1839 he came to Concord, where he attended the public schools, and subsequently the academy, from which he was graduated in 1844. He soon entered the service of Isaac Hill & Sons, editors and publishers of Hill’s New Hampshire Patriot, remaining in their employ about two years. Thence onward until 1854 he was a journeyman printer in various offices. In that year he formed a partnership with P. B. Cogswell in the printing business. Four years later he sold out to Mr. Cogswell, who, in 1893, became Mayor of the city. Mr. Jones, in 1859, went into partnership with Fogg & Hadley, editors and publishers of the Independent Democrat, the association continuing for eight years. From...

Biography of Frank Willard Grafton, M.D.

Frank Willard Grafton, M.D., a successful medical practitioner of Concord, was born in Gilford, N.H., in 1869, son of James and Mary Jane (Collins) Grafton. The earliest known progenitor of this family, also named James, emigrated from Scotland to America, locating in Cushing, Me., where he cleared a tract of land, and was afterward engaged in farming. He married, and had a large family, of whom Joseph, the eldest child, was the great-grandfather of Frank Willard. Joseph Grafton, born in Cushing, who was also engaged in agricultural pursuits, passing his entire life on the farm, married, and reared a large family. His son, James Grafton, attended the common schools of his native town until he was seventeen years of age. Then he engaged in seafaring, which he had Margaret Davis, and they had a large family. James Grafton, Jr., the father of Frank Willard, after acquiring his education in the public schools of Cushing, went to sea, continuing to make voyages for five years thereafter. He then came to Laconia, N.H., and worked at brickmaking for a year. In 1862 he enlisted in the Third New Hampshire Heavy Artillery, and subsequently served two and one-half years in the Civil War. After receiving his discharge he returned to Bow, where he has since been engaged in farming. He married Mary Jane Collins; and they had two children, of whom Frank W. is the only survivor. His maternal grandparents were James and Elmirah Collins, of Goffstown, Hillsborough County. After attending the public schools and receiving private instruction, Frank W. Grafton took a course of study at the Bryant & Stratton Business...

Biography of Curtis White

Curtis White, a retired carpenter of Concord, was born at Bow, N.H., April 4, 1861, son of Daniel White, of that place. The grandfather, Isaac White, who was an early settler of Bow, went there from Pembroke, and converted a grant of land into a good farm home for himself and his family. Daniel, the youngest son, was a blacksmith and stone worker. He purchased a farm opposite his father’s, and there carried on stone work as well as some farming. His death occurred March 16, 1825, after a lingering and painful illness, in the course of which he was obliged to undergo several and painful surgical operations. He married Mary Carter, daughter of Moses Carter, of the old Concord family of that name. They had three children besides Curtis. William, the eldest, died in October, 1826. Their daughter, Mary Ann, is also deceased; and the second son, Daniel C., is a practising dentist in Alton, Ill. Curtis White, who was the second-born of his parents’ children, followed various lines of business throughout his active period. After leaving the district school, he worked at farming for a time. He also did some black-smithing and carpentry, and for a while he was employed in a saw and grist mill. For many years Mr. White was a carpenter in Concord, and for about ten years he was engaged in carriage-building in this city. In the spring of 1891 he retired from business, and took a trip to California, where he remained until March of the following year. Mr. White has always been considered a good financier. Mr. White was united in...

Biography of Henry M. Baker

Henry M. Baker, of Bow, Merrimack County, lawyer and Congressman, and son of Aaron Whittemore and Nancy (Dustin) Baker, was born in Bow, January 11, 1841. He comes of patriotic and heroic ancestry. His great-great-grandfather, Captain Joseph Baker, a Colonial surveyor, married Hannah, only daughter of Captain John Lovewell, the famous Indian fighter, who was killed in the battle of Pigwacket, May 8, 1725. A few years later the township of Suncook, or Lovewell’s town, which included much of the present town of Pembroke, was granted by Massachusetts to the surviving participants and the heirs of those killed in that battle. As its boundaries conflicted with those of the town of Bow, chartered May 10, 1727, by Governor Wentworth, of New Hampshire, the grantees never received the full benefits of the grant. The resulting contention was terminated December 13, 1804, when that part of Bow east of the Merrimac River was annexed to Pembroke and Concord. The Colonial heroine, Hannah Dustin, was a maternal ancestor of Henry M. Baker. Another maternal relative was Walter Bryant, who surveyed many of the townships and the eastern boundary of the State, and was prominent in Colonial affairs. Captain Baker’s son, Joseph, married a descendant of one of the Scotch Covenanters, and settled in Bow. He was among the first to locate there, and the acres he cleared and cultivated are a part of the family homestead. He was a soldier in the Revolution and a man of energy and influence. James Baker, son of Joseph, married a grand-daughter of the Rev. Aaron Whittemore, the first clergyman settled in Pembroke. Of their six...

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