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The Natural History of Ocmulgee Bottoms

Ocmulgee Bottoms is a corridor of the Ocmulgee River Flood Plain in the central region of the State of Georgia that begins at the Fall Line in Macon, GA and continues 38 miles southward to near Hawkinsville, GA. This region is located in Bibb, Twiggs, Houston, Bleckley and Pulaski Counties. The Ocmulgee River’s velocity slows dramatically upon entering the Bottoms and has a serpentine channel. Over the eons, the river here has meandered frequently across the breath of the flood plain, leaving hundreds of ponds and swamps, plus a deep layer of rich, alluvial soil. On top of the alluvial soil is from one to ten feet or red clay that was deposited during the period when cotton was cultivated in the Piedmont, upstream.

Native American History of Bleckley County, Georgia

Bleckley County is located in central Georgia.  It is named after Edward Logan Bleckley (1827 – 1907) – a lawyer and Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court.  Its county seat is Cochran.  Bleckley is the location of the nation’s oldest two year public college, Middle Georgia College. Bleckley County is bordered on the north by both Wilkinson and Twiggs Counties. Laurens County forms its eastern boundary. Dodge County forms its southwestern boundary while Pulaski County forms its southwestern boundary. It is bordered to the west by Houston County.  The Ocmulgee River forms a relatively short section of the county’s northwestern boundary. Geology and hydrology Bleckley County is located in the Atlantic Coastal Plain geological region. The Atlantic Coastal Plain is characterized by underlying rock strata that are relatively young sedimentary rock from the Late Cretaceous Period, when the shore of the Atlantic Ocean ran through present day Bleckley County. Here the terrain is much more moderate than in the Piedmont, varying from gently rolling hills to flat bottomlands. Bleckley County’s largest stream is the Ocmulgee River, which flows along the northwestern side of the county.  Other major streams include the Little Ocmulgee River, Brushy Creek, Big Bend Creek, Evergreen Creek, Harrison Branch, Little Limestone Creek, Reedy Creek and Wilson Branch.  The Little Ocmulgee River is essentially a band of slowly moving swamp water within Bleckley County. The Ocmulgee River joins the Oconee River in southern Georgia to become the Altamaha River, which eventually reaches the Atlantic Ocean.  The Ocmulgee River in the vicinity of Bleckley County is deep enough to have been navigable by the largest of Native...

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