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Biography of G. W. Ozmont

G.W. OZMENT. – This gentleman is a veteran of the Indian wars, a survivor of many a bloody fight in Southern Oregon, and a pioneer of 1852. Born at Greensborough, North Carolina, in 1833, he became an orphan at the age of ten, and at fifteen went to Western Virginia with an uncle, and somewhat later was in Tennessee, working on his own account. The far West, however, was the land of his dreams; and he saved his earnings to go to Paducah, and from that point to St. Louis. Three months later he was on his way to St. Joseph by steamer. But ice in the river delayed progress at the Kansas river; and there he was glad to join the train of Mr. William McCown, who was on the way to Oregon. The journey, begun May 7, 1852, was favorable, meeting with only the usual hardships of the way until reaching the Cascade Mountains. There the train met with snow; and the teams were too much exhausted to draw the loaded wagons farther. Mr. McCown pushed on to Oregon City for help, leaving Mr. Ozment two weeks in the mountains to look after the goods. The first months of Oregon life were spent in Clackamas county erecting buildings for Mr. McCown, the winter with Mr. Case on Butte creek, and the following spring with Reverend A.F. Waller in Polk county. During the summer and second winter he was at the Belknap settlement in Benton county. In 1854 he moved to the Siuslaw, making his home with Mr. Cartwright, and was engaged by Moses Miliner in packing to...

Biography of Marion Francis Mulkey

MARION FRANCIS MULKEY.- This gentleman, the eldest son of Johnson Mulkey, and who took up, and conducted in the spirit, and to some extent in the method, the pioneer activities of his father, was born in Johnson county, Missouri, November 14, 1836. He was therefore but a boy of ten when, in 1847, he accompanied his father across the continent to Oregon. His, however, was one of those old heads on young shoulders; and so responsible was he, and so capable of affairs, that he was intrusted with the driving of oxen, and all work adapted to his strength, with the same confidence as a grown man. Upon arriving in Oregon and beginning life anew on the Donation claim in Benton county, he played his part in felling timber, breaking and fencing land, and erecting the frontiersman’s temporary buildings as vigorously as anyone in the family. He early drew from his parents a desire for education, and after his first essays in learning at the log schoolhouse, under the tuition of such men as Senator J.H. Slater, and Honorable Philip Ritz, was eager to take advantage of the assistance furnished by his father to pursue higher studies at Forest Grove, under the guidance of the late Doctor S.H. Marsh. This assistance he supplemented by labor of his own, following the traditional method of the youth ambitious of self-improvement, -teaching school during vacations. It was while at school that the Indian war of 1856 broke out; and, although then but a boy of eighteen, young Mulkey saddled his pony and rode off to the seat of hostilities. In 1858 he...

Biographical Sketch of Dr. V. C. Balkans

A well known and popular physician of Prairie City, and one whose kind, attentive treatment of the sick, and geniality of manner towards the well have made hint deservedly the favorite of all classes, was born near Corvallis, Ore, in 1871. He received his preliminary education in the schools of Prineville, and later in Portland. He graduated from Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia in 1894, and then practiced for a while in the hospital there. In January 1895, he located at Prairie City, where he is still practicing. He is married to Miss Clara McHaley, and his home is the circle of a host of warm friends. Dr. Belknap is a member of the Oregon Medical Society, and also belongs to a number of the leading fraternal orders being a Mason, Odd Fellow, Woodman and...

Biography of Hon. John Stewart

HON. JOHN STEWART. – This gentleman was born February 12, 1800, in Virginia, that grand old state which has given birth to heroes and cradled the world’s best since the white man first took possession of this fair land of ours. There our subject was nurtured through all his infancy and until his fifteenth year, when his parents moved to Terre Haute, Indiana. He resided in that state until 1837, learning the blacksmith trade, which calling so nearly broke down his health that he abandoned it and engaged in trading cattle. He first earned his title of captain in the Black Hawk war, through which he served from beginning to end. In 1837 he left Indiana and moved to Holt County, Missouri, where he was elected county judge for four successive terms. On January 7, 1842, Captain Stewart was united in Marriage to Miss Mary Scott; and the happy couple lived in all peace and mutual esteem for three years, when they started on May 12, 1845, to journey across the plains to Oregon. Mr. Stewart was elected the captain of a company of five hundred wagons and about twenty-five hundred souls. The company also drove an immense herd of cattle and horses, but had the misfortune to lose so many that on arriving at the journey’s end they had comparatively few. Just after leaving Fort Laramie the train was stopped by the Pawnee Indians; and all the men decline risking their lives in meeting and treating with the chiefs. However, Captain Stewart and Prior Scott were prompt volunteers, and succeeded in effecting a compromise with the Indians by...

Biography of Johnson Mulkey

JOHNSON MULKEY. – This prominent pioneer of Oregon was born in Knox County, Kentucky, in January, 1808. His father, Philip Mulkey, and mother (whose maiden name was Margaret Miller), were natives of Germany. In the year 1818 they moved with their young family to Missouri, settling in Lafayette County, where the father soon after died, leaving his widow with nine children. Johnson was married in 1835 to Mrs. Susan Roberts, née Brown. In the summer of 1845 he crossed the plains to Oregon, and on arriving took up a land claim in Benton county three miles west of what is now Corvallis. Returning to Missouri in 1846, in the spring of 1847 he again started westward, accompanied by his family, two brothers, Luke and Thomas, with their families, and also a large number of old friends and neighbors. The company brought a large herd of cattle. after a summer’s long, hard travel, so well remembered by all early pioneers, they arrived in the Willamette valley in the month of October. Mr. Mulkey engaged in the avocation of rearing and dealing in stock. His home was always open to new settlers, whom he assisted according to their necessities with work, seeds, and kind, encouraging words. Finding the church organization to which he belonged struggling to gain a foothold in the new country, he immediately connected therewith and contributed liberally toward its support; and no man in Benton county did more to extend its usefulness and influence. News of the discover of gold in California reaching Oregon, he was among the first to repair thither with cattle, pack-trains, etc. Several trips...

Biography of Hon. James P. Stewart

HON. JAMES P. STEWART. – In a notice of the Honorable James P. Stewart by the local press, when his name was presented for the suffrages of his fellow-citizens for a seat in the legislature of Washington Territory, it was most truthfully said: “he is a man of affairs, – a big, bronzed, broad-shouldered man, who moves about among his fellow-men with that quiet consciousness of strength that carries conviction and wins. He has been a winner all his life; and people applaud his winning. He has been as honest as he has been progressive. Mr. Stewart is a native of the State of New York, and was born in Delaware county September 21, 1833. He lived on the farm of his parents, enjoying the customary opportunities for acquiring knowledge or education afforded the farm lads of the Middle states one-half century ago. Young Stewart, full of energy, made the best use of his opportunities, and at the age of nineteen left the parental home and engaged in teaching school, working on the farm through the summer, and devoting the winter to teaching. He migrated to Oregon in 1855, and settled at Corvallis. he remained there until April, 1859, when he removed to the Puyallup valley on the last day of that month, which has since been his home. During his residence at Corvallis he occupied his time in merchandising, teaching school, and served one official term as sheriff of Benton county. In 1861 the people of Pierce count elected him judge of the probate court, which office he held for the term of four years, with great credit...

Biography of Green B. Smith

GREEN B. SMITH. – There are few names more widely known among the pioneers of Western Oregon than that which stands at the head of this sketch. Few lives have been more full of adventure. After a long life actively spent among the trials and vicissitudes incident to a frontier life, he finally yielded to the fiat of nature; and, in obedience to the summons that must come to all, he passed over the dark river. His death, which leaves but a comparatively small number of that old pioneer’s phalanx of 1845, who marched two thousand miles across a trackless desert to found a home in the far West, occurred on the 7th of May, 1886. Mr. G.B. Smith was born in Grayson County, West Virginia, September 10, 1820, and was the son of George and Nancy (Hamilton) Smith. At the age of sixteen years, his parents removing to St. Joseph county, Indiana, he accompanied them thither, assisting in the cultivation of the farm until 1840, when he emigrated to Platte County, Missouri, and there remained until the spring of 1845.At this period, accompanied by his brother Alexander (who died at the Sandwich Islands in 1850), Mr. Smith joined a train composed of sixty-six wagons at St. Joseph, Missouri, under the command of Captain T’ault, and commenced the long journey across the plains. After successive changes in the leaders of the party, that well-known veteran, Stephen Meek, undertook to conduct them into the Willamette valley by the old Columbia route; but unfortunately, when at the place since called Silver lake, located west of the Blue Mountains, the guide found...

Biography of Hon. James Harvey Slater

HON. JAMES HARVEY SLATER. – Mr. Slater has ever borne a conspicuous part in the public affairs of Oregon; and no one has preserved a more honorable name. His mental qualities are solid rather than brilliant, and his operations weighty rather than keen. He is a man whose integrity has never been impeached; and he has ever been relied upon as a friend of the people. In his two terms at Washington, once as congressman, once as senator, he has performed some very effective work for our state; and all Oregonians hold him in high esteem. The following brief sketch will furnish the data of his life, and be eagerly read by all. He was born in Sangamon county, Illinois, in 1826, and remained there until 1849. He received a common-school education, and prepared himself for college; but, abandoning further advance in that line he concluded to try his fortunes in California, coming to the Pacific coast in 1849. After a year in California he came up the coast to Oregon, and located near Corvallis in Benton county, where he put to good use his former education by teaching public school for two years. In 1853 he made a venturesome trip to California, and was at Yreka during the Indian troubles in which General Joseph Lane took so prominent a part. he returned to Oregon the same fall. In 1854 he married Miss Elizabeth E. Grey, a daughter of Reverend R.D. Grey. Having pursued legal studies, he was admitted to the bar in the same year, and continued his occupation as clerk of the Untied States district court, to...

Biographical Sketch of John M. Newman

JOHN M. NEWMAN. – The gentleman whom we here introduce to the reader, and a view of whose residence is placed in this history, is a native of Sullivan County, Missouri, and was born August 10,1851. While but a lad of thirteen he came to eastern Oregon, and, after a sojourn of a year upon the sage-brush plains, continued the march to the Willamette valley. Some years were there spent in Marion and Benton counties, the most interesting period of his life there being his marriage to Miss Isabel Forgey, a noble woman who has borne him eight children. In 1878 he arrived in the Kittitas valley, and took a claim seven miles from Ellensburgh, Washington Territory. There he still resides, and is engaged in cultivating his farm. He intersperses the time with running a blacksmith shop, which is well patronized. His one hundred and ninety acres of excellent land supporting many head of horses and cattle, producing much grain, and improved with good buildings and an orchard of three hundred trees, is now one of the most delightful places in Kittitas county. As justice of the peace, as school director, and in many public ways, Mr. Newman assists in helping on the community, and is a well-respected citizen. His progressive and helpful qualities are sought, and are ever ready to be lent in schemes of public improvement, such as immigration, etc. His surviving children are Olive M., Lillie V., James Otis, Minnie May, Fred P., Jacob Niles. Ada and Lena are...

Biography of Louis F. Horning

Louis F. Horning, who follows farming on Camas prairie, is a native of the Sunset state, his birth having there occurred August 20, 1851. His father, Frederick Horning, was born in Prussia, August 9, 1822, and was educated in Germany, after which he came with his father, George Godfrey Horning, to America. The last named was likewise a Prussian by birth, and on crossing the Atlantic he took up his residence in St. Louis, being one of the pioneers of that now populous city. For fifteen hundred dollars he sold ten acres of land which is now in the heart of the city and is now worth an almost fabulous price. He afterward went to Westport, Missouri, and located on the present site of Kansas City, where his heirs now have a vineyard which he formerly owned. He lived to be ninety-three years of age, and died in 1870. Frederick Horning, the father of our subject, went to Milwaukee, Oregon, in 1849, at which time that little place had hopes of becoming the metropolis of the state. Later he settled near Corvallis and purchased a donation claim, which he improved, transforming it into a good farm. He spent his last days in retirement from labor, and died in 1892, at the age of seventy years. He married Miss Mary A. Johnson, a native of Kentucky. Her father crossed the plains with his family at a very early day and suffered greatly on the journey. The wife and one daughter died on the plains. The mother of our subject departed this life in her thirty-ninth year. Like her husband she...
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