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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Thomas J. Ellis

(See Adair and Grant)-Mary May, daughter of Robert Taylor and Sue Krebs (McCoy) Morrison born April 12, 1884 in Sequoyah District. Educated in the Cherokee National Schools. Married in Bartlesville Jan. 28, 1901 Thomas Jefferson, son of Thomas Jefferson and V. Elks, born Dec. 16, 1881 in Sedan, Chautauqua County, Kansas. They are the parents of Gladys, born May 10, 1905; Evelyn, born June 23, 1907 and Judson Ellis, born Oct. 29, 1909. Thomas Jefferson Ellis is a member of the Masonic fraternity and is one of the substantial cattlemen and bankers of Washington County. One of the leading democrats of Washington County, he was appointed as the first county assessor in 1911 and elected to the same office in 1912. Ellen, daughter of Andrew and Mary (Miller) Adair married Richard Martin, son of Alexander and Sarah Elizabeth (Hicks) McCoy and they were the parents of Mrs. Sue Krebs (McCoy)...

Biography of James Colyer Gordon

James Colyer Gordon, superintendent of the waterworks system of Independence, had, together with his father, who for thirty years was engineer of the waterworks, had more to do with making this public utility a splendid and effleient organ of public service than any other individual. Independence had had a system of waterworks for thirty years or more. For many years it had been a municipally owned plant and the city corporation had expended an immense amount of money in perfecting the plant and the source of supply. The new water plant is located a mile and a half northeast of the city on the Verdigris River. Its more important equipment is as follows: An Allis-Chalmers Corliss Compound 4,000,000-gallon high duty pumping engine, besides a 3,000,000-gallon low duty and a 1,500,000-gallon low duty pumping engine. There are two pumps, Gardner Compound Duplex, with a capacity of 1,500,000 gallons each, inherited from the old plant, and there are 300 horse power boilers. The storage capacity is for 8,000,000 gallons, divided into three basins, and there is a clear water well. The plant also comprises three gravity filters, each of 1,000,000 gallons capacity. This branch of the Gordon family is of Scotch-Irish descent and a great many of the family are to be found in the states of Indiana and Illinois. James Carter Gordon was born at New Harmony, Indiana, October 31, 1874. His father is Francis Marion Gordon, who was born at Poseyville, Indiana, in 1848, was reared there and married Rose Anderson, who was born in Indiana in 1852 and died at Independence in 1896. Francis M. Gordon early learned...

Biography of C. O. Ross

C. O. Ross. In a conspicuous place on the roll of men who have become successful through their connection with the oil and gas industry is found the name of C. O. Ross, a native of the Buckeye state and a splendid type of the alert, progressive and public-apirited men whose records are indications that success is ambition’s answer. His long and prominent connection with the oil business began at the time of his majority, when he started in at the bottom to make his way to a position of prominence, and no oil producer in Kansas has a better record for high and straightforward business conduct, or for success won with honor. With the exception of six months spent in Colorado he has made Coffeyville his home and the center of his activities since 1907. Mr. Ross was born on a farm in Wesley Township, Bartlett P. O., Washington County, Ohio, January 16, 1875, and is a son of James and Martha (Heald) Ross. Thomas Ross, his grandfather, was born in 1796, in Scotland, and as a young unmarried man came to America, making his way from New York to Virginia, where for some years he was engaged in farming. In later life he removed to Illinois, where he continued in agricultural pursuits until his death in 1876, when he was eighty years of age. With native thrift and industry, Mr. Ross accumulated a satisfying property and was known as one of his community’s solid and substantial men. He was married in Virginia, and became the father of two children: Sarah, the widow of Elwood Lambert, who died...

Biography of George Whiteturkey

Throughout his entire life George Whiteturkey has resided on the farm which is still his home and which is situated two and a half miles east of Bartlesville. His birth occurred in the year 1870. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon Whiteturkey, who were part Delaware Indians. The father was a farmer of Kansas and in March, 1867, removed to the Cherokee Nation, living at Forks Caney for a time and afterward in other localities. He subsequently bought a place near Bartlesville but he died during the infancy of his son, George, and the mother has also passed away. The father was a Civil war veteran. George Whiteturkey lives on the original family homestead, comprising one hundred and sixty acres of land and his children own four hundred and thirty acres adjoining. For many years he carried on general farming and stock raising and met with substantial success in that way. He has erected a beautiful residence, a large and commodious barn and sheds on his place and has all of the modern equipment on his farm. He actively engaged in tilling the soil until after the discovery of oil on his place, from which he draws very substantial royalties. Thirty years ago Mr. Whiteturkey was united in marriage to Miss Katie Wheeler, who is also part Delaware. She was born a mile south of Bartlesville and is a daughter of Jack Wheeler, who was a farmer and died when Mrs. Whiteturkey was but six years of age. Her mother, Mrs. Mary Wheeler, has also passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Whiteturkey have become parents of five...

Biography of O. B. Toalson

Many lines of activity profit by the enterprising spirit and resourceful business ability of O. B. Toalson, agriculturist, dairyman and lumberman, whose marked executive ability and determination have enabled him to carry forward to a successful termination whatever he has undertaken. He was born in the western part of Missouri, January 10, 1869, and there acquired his education. In 1906, when thirty-seven years of age, he came to Bartlesville and embarked in the retail lumber business, in which he is still engaged. Broadening the scope of his activities, in 1911 he turned his attention to the dairy business, the family taking up their residence on a farm, and it was owing to their desire to live in the country that he determined to enter this field. After thorough investigation he found that Holstein cattle were unsurpassed, as milk producers and he started his herd with five pure bred Holsteins, while he now has seventy-eight head, likewise engaging in breeding high grade males, for which he finds a ready sale. He has thirty-eight stanchions, besides eight stalls f or calves and his dairy buildings are modern, sanitary and well equipped, for he has made a comprehensive study of this branch of agriculture. The superior quality of the output commands for it a ready sale. His cow barn is thirty-two by seventy feet and has an L thirty-two by fifty-six feet in dimensions. The horse barn is sixty-two by seventy. His home farm comprises four hundred and ten acres of land, on which he raises all of his rough feed, and he has built two silos, one with a capacity of...

Biography of E. M. Revard

E. M. Revard is a progressive young agriculturist of Washington county and although but} twenty-three years of age he has already become the owner of extensive farming interests in this section of the state, his business affairs being most judiciously managed. He was born in Cedarville, Kansas, December 19, 1898, and is a son of Francis and Belle (Higgins) Revard, prominent and highly respected residents of Bartlesville, the father devoting his attention to the raising of stock, in which he has been very successful. Among the most highly prized possessions of the subject of this review is a letter, dated December 21, 1898, which was written by the Indian agent, Mr. Pollick, to his father, congratulating him upon the birth of his son, E. M. Revard. E. M. Revard acquired his education in the Lexington Military School of Missouri and when nineteen years of age he engaged in the cultivation of a farm three miles southwest of Bartlesville. He has made extensive investments in farm lands and is now the owner of six hundred and fifty-seven acres of land, but is farming only eighty acres of the home place, leasing the remainder and receiving large royalties from oil wells located thereon. His home farm is situated on the edge of Sand creek in a very fertile agricultural section, and he devotes his attention to the growing of alfalfa and corn and also to the raising of hogs. His land is rich and productive, owing to the care and labor which he bestows upon it, and he has added many improvements to his place, erecting a fine modern residence, substantial...

Biography of Addison Fox McCaleb

Addison Fox McCaleb, one of the most prominent and prosperous citizens of northeastern Oklahoma, where he first took up his abode forty-three years ago, was elected mayor of Bartlesville in April, 1920, and has since capably discharged the duties devolving upon him in that important position. He was born at Harrison, Tennessee, on the 10th of January, 1861, a son of Charles and Elizabeth (Gardenhire) McCaleb, the former a native of east Tennessee and the latter of Hamilton county, that state. The father held the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Civil war and was wounded in battle, but his injuries were not considered sufficiently serious to incapacitate him for active service. Following the close of the war, however, he became ill and died soon afterward. His wife is also deceased. Addison F. McCaleb attended the public schools of his native city in the acquirement of an education, but his wide general information has been largely obtained in the school of experience. On the 14th of April, 1878, when a youth of seventeen years, he arrived in the Indian Territory, settling at Vinita, and for a quarter of a century he devoted his attention to farming and cattle raising in this section, having five thousand acres of land under cultivation in Nowata and Rogers counties. In 1903 he embarked in the mercantile business at Bartlesville and also became an oil producer but sold out his interests a decade later and removed to Phoenix, Arizona, for the benefit of his wife’s health. At Phoenix he became identified with milling interests, but his property there was destroyed by fire, entailing a...

Biography of G. O. Hall, M. D.

The career of Dr. G. O. Hall, a leading physician of Bartlesville, is proof of the fact that it is only under adverse conditions that the best and strongest in the individual are developed, for he is a self-educated, self-made man whose indomitable purpose and untiring effort have enabled him to overcome all obstacles and difficulties in his path and work his way steadily forward to the goal of success. A native of Texas, he was born September 1, 1882, and is a son of Dr. P. B. Hall, who for the past twenty-one years has been engaged in the practice of medicine at Marlow, Oklahoma, being one of the well known physicians of that locality. G. O. Hall was regarded as a dull boy in school and owing to his retiring nature was not popular with his playmates, but by those who knew him well he was loved and trusted. His early life was one of hardship and privations and when twelve years of age he was run over by a wagon, the injury causing an infection which necessitated the use of crutches for five years, and he is still lame. The accident nearly cost him his life and he was obliged to remain out of school for three years but studied at home and made three grades during this time. His parents were in straitened circumstances and before completing his high school course he was obliged to aid in providing for his own support, working for a year for a telephone company. He went to Dallas, Texas, for the purpose of taking a commercial course and lack...

Biography of Mrs. Jane Buford

Among the honored pioneer women of Oklahoma is numbered Mrs. Jane Buford, who resides in a beautiful home at No. 102 North Cherokee street in Bartlesville. She is a member of the Delaware tribe of Indians and during her infancy was brought by her parents to Indian Territory at an early period in its settlement. She acquired a thorough knowledge of the English language, in which she converses as fluently as in her native tongue, and as a young woman she was united in marriage to Jacob Wheeler, now deceased. They became the parents of three children: Lena, the eldest in the family, was accorded liberal educational advantages, attending the University at Muskogee and Haskell Institute at Lawrence, Kansas. She is the widow of Dennis Parker and the mother of three children, Geneva Blanche, Edward Job and Leona Marie, all of whom are attending school. Edward Wheeler, the second in order of birth, acquired his education in the schools of Fort Worth, Texas, and Chilocco, Oklahoma, and is still at home. Bryant, who was educated at Lawrence, Kansas, is deceased. All of the family have their allotments of land and receive royalties in oil. Following the demise of her first husband Mrs. Wheeler married Mr. Buford, who has also passed away. Previous to establishing her home in Bartlesville she resided on a large farm within a few miles of the town. Practically her entire life has been passed in this state and she remembers the time when the Indians far outnumbered the white settlers and the land was wild and undeveloped, its rich resources being then undreamed of. She...

Biography of W. F. Maberry

In the final analysis farming is the basis of prosperity in America. It is the very beginning of the intricate operations which furnish man with food, and among those whose activity in the cultivation of the soil has promoted the development of northeastern Oklahoma, is numbered W. F. Maberry, who resides on a well improved farm in the vicinity of Bartlesville. A native of Missouri, he was born December 12, 1874, and in 1899, when twenty-five years of age, he came to Oklahoma, first locating on Marmon creek, in Nowata county. For two years he engaged in farming in that -locality and then went to Dewey, Washington county, devoting his attention to the operation of fifteen hundred and seventy-five acres of land, situated north of the town, the tract being owned by himself and brother, I. J. Maberry, now deceased. For four years they were thus occupied, at the end of which period the subject of this review purchased a seventy-acre farm eight miles east of Bartlesville, which he has since made his home, and he also has a ranch of two hundred and ten acres on Hogshooter creek and a tract of one hundred acres on Bird creek, situated one and a half miles from Owasso, in Tulsa county, which he leases. He has a fine country home on the Bartlesville-Nowata road and has added many improvements to his place, erecting substantial barns and other necessary outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock and utilizing the best farm machinery on the market. Working diligently as the years have passed, he has succeeded in bringing his land to...
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