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Biography of Mark H. Williams

Mark H. Williams, now living retired at Barnes and enjoying the accumulations of many well spent years, is a veteran of the Civil war and had been a resident of Barnes and of the State of Kansas since 1885. He is a native Pennsyivanian, and the family was introduced to that state from Scotland by his grandfather, Evan Williams, who was born in Scotland in 1771. He was a millwright by trade, and followed that occupation for many years in Pennsylvania. He died in Center County, of that state, in 1854. It was in Center County, Pennsylvania, that Mark H. Williams was born July 29, 1842. His father, John Williams, was born in Chester County, Penngylvania, in 1811, took up the same vocation as his father, and worked at that trade in Pennsylvania. His death occurred in Center County in 1876. He was a democrat and a member of the Lutheran Church. He married Catherine Watson, who was born in Clariou County, Pennsylvania, in 1813 and died in Center County in 1846. They had four children: Even Thomas, a blacksmith by trade who died in Center County, Pennsylvania, in 1873; Mark H.; Hannah Jane, who died in Jefferson County, Pennsylvania, in 1897, and her husband, S. P. Davison, also deceased, was a lumberman; John Irving is a carpenter and contractor but is now postmaster of Lamont, Center County, Pennsylvanis. Mark H. Williams had a brief education in the public schools of Center County. He may be said to have supported himself since he was seven years of age. He worked on farms in his native county and in Jefferson...

Biography of L. A. Winsor

L. A. Winsor is superintendent of the city echools of Irving, and for a number of years had been identified with public school work in Marshall County. He is known as a very capable educator and stands high among the school men in the northern part of the state. His people have been in Kansas for over forty years. His grandfather was born in England in 1837 and on coming to this country located first in Canada and from there moved to the State of Iowa, and in 1874 went to Thomas County, Kansas. After about a year he returned to Walker, Iowa, and subsequently retired and moved to the Hood River country of Oregon. He was a dairy farmer and also a teacher and saw actlve service in the Union army during the Civil war. He died at Hood River, Oregon, in 1902. he married Katherine Walker, who died at Walker, Iowa. J. L. Winsor, father of the Irving educator, was born in Walker, Iowa, in 1861 and came with his parents to Kansas at the age of thirteen. Later he returned to Walker, Iowa, but as a young man located at Barnes, Kansas, where he was married and where he followed his trade as a carpenter. In 1895 he removed to Washington, Kansas, and engaged in business as a contractor and builder, a line he had successfully followed to the present date. He is a democrat, a member of the Presbyterian Church and is affiliated with the Masonic Order and the Eastern Star and the Jndependent Order of Odd Fellows. J. L. Winsor married Hattie E. Hardin,...

Biography of James Covington Ingman

James Covington Ingman has lived in Kansas since 1885, and accumulated and until recent years activsly managed a large amount of farming property in the vicinity of Barnes. He is now living retired, at the age of seventy-eight, and had made his own way in the world since early boyhood. Mr. Ingman was born at Summerford in Madison County, Ohio, June 14, 1839. He is of English ancestry. One of his ancestors served in the Revolutionary war. The family were early settlers in Tennessee and later in Virginia. His graudfather, Henry Ingman was born in Virginia in 1777, and at an early date located in Ohio and was a farmer in Fairfield County until his death in 1863. He married Henrietta Rigby, also a flative of Virginia, and she died in Fairfield County, Ohio. Otho William Ingman, father of James C., was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1813, a date which indieates the very early settlement of the family there. He grew up and marrled in his native county and was an industrious worker nearly all his life at the blacksmith’s trade. From Fairfield he removed to Madison County, where his son James C. was born, and later to Union County, Ohio, and died at Marysville in that county in 1869. He began voting as a whig and subsequently affiliated with the republican party. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and of the Masonic fraternity. Otho W. Ingman married Matilda Birky, who was born at Newark in Licking County, Ohio, in 1815 and died at Summerford in 1852. Her children were: Samuel, deceased; James C.;...

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