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The Mormon Question

The fifteenth legislative assembly of Idaho convened December lo, 1878, when the people were excited over Mormonism more than in regard to all other things together. In all contested elections the Mormon candidates were excluded, and even an undue prejudice was bitterly exhibited against them. Congress was memorialized to refuse Utah admission into the Union, and also to require of homestead and preemption settlers an oath giving a statement of their polygamous practices. Already the local law required superintendents of schools to sub-scribe to an affidavit that they were neither bigamists nor polygamists, but at this session it was so altered that in case the person challenged were a woman the objectionable terms should not be included in the oath! At this session, also, was created the county of Elmore from the western portion of Alturas county, and Logan and Custer counties were formed. In the case of Elmore county, after much display of parliamentary tactics, the bill was passed, although the speaker became so excited that he bolted and left the chair abruptly during the reading of the journal on the last day of the session. The president of the council also left his chair on the last day of the session, in order to obstruct the passage of a measure obnoxious to him. In neither case was the action successful, as the house immediately elected George P. Wheeler, of Bingham, chairman, and the council chose S. F. Taylor, of the same county, president. To encourage the settlement of the territory a board of immigration was established. This measure was recommended by the committee on territorial affairs, whose...

Biography of James H. Hawley

No Compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of the honored subject of this sketch a man remarkable in the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong individuality, and yet one whose entire life has not one esoteric phase, being an open scroll, inviting the closest scrutiny. True, his have been “massive deeds and great” in one sense, and yet his entire life accomplishment but represents the result of the fit utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing of his efforts in those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. There is in Mr. Hawley a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and a fidelity of purpose that commands the respect of all. A man of indefatigable enterprise and fertility of resource, he has carved his name deeply on the record of the political, commercial and professional history of the state, which owes much of its advancement to his efforts. James H. Hawley was born in Dubuque, Iowa, on the 17th of January 1847, and in his veins mingles the blood of English, Dutch and Irish ancestors. The Hawley family was founded in America in 1760. William Carr, the maternal great-grandfather of our subject, was a major in the Revolutionary army; and the grandfather, Henry Carr, commanded a company in the war of 1812, with the rank of captain. Thomas Hawley, his father, was born in Brooklyn, New York, and became a civil engineer by profession. He married Miss...

Biography of Presley M. Bruner

A prominent practitioner at the bar of Hailey, and ex-district attorney of Alturas (now Blaine) County, Idaho, Presley Morris Bruner, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio. September 15, 1850. On the paternal side is of German lineage, and on the maternal of Scotch descent. His father, J. A. Bruner, was born in Virginia, a representative of one of the old and prominent families of that state, living in the Blue mountain region. He married Miss Margaret Morris, a daughter of Judge Presley Morris, of Chillicothe, Ohio. Her father was a descendant of the McDonald clan of the highlands of Scotland, and traced his ancestry back to Mary, Queen of Scots. Mr. Bruner’s father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, and devoted fifty-six years of his life to spreading the gospel of peace on earth, good will to men. He removed to California in 1856, going by way of the isthmus, and spent the remainder of his days as a member of the California conference. He was a man of scholarly attainments, of marked ability in his chosen calling, a persuasive speaker and a power for good among men. He departed this life in 1892, at the age of seventy years, and his wife passed away three years previously, at the age of sixty-nine. She was to him a most faithful helpmeet, ably assisting him in his work, and by her influence, example and kindly spirit largely augmenting the efforts of her husband This worthy couple were the parents of seven children, six of whom are living. Three of the sons and one of the daughters completed classical courses...

Biography of Francis E. Ensign

Holding marked prestige among the prominent members of the Idaho bar is Francis Edward Ensign, who is now engaged in the practice of the legal profession in Hailey. There are few-men whose lives are crowned with the honor and respect which is uniformly accorded him; but through forty-five years” connection with the west his has been an unblemished career. With him success in life has been reached by sterling qualities of mind and a heart true to every manly principle. In his varied business interests his reputation has been unassailable and in offices of public trust he has displayed a loyalty that classed him among the valued citizens of the commonwealth. He has nearly reached the seventieth milestone that marks earth’s pilgrimage, but is still concerned with the active affairs of life, and in the courts of his district displays a strong mentality undimmed by time and a power of argument that wins him many notable forensic victories. A native of Ohio, Mr. Ensign was born in Painesville, March 4, 1829, and is descended from English ancestors who came from the “merrie isle” to the New World, locating in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1630, only two years after the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. A little later the Ensigns became pioneer settlers of Hartford, Connecticut. The paternal grandfather of our subject was one of the first settlers of Pitts-field and one of the incorporators of the town. When Benedict Arnold, then in command of American forces in the Revolutionary war, at-tempted the capture of Fort Ticonderoga, he volunteered and aided in taking that British strong-hold, bringing away with...

Biography of Joseph F. Griffin

For more than a half century Joseph F. Griffin, of Ketchum, has resided in the northwest. A native of Kentucky, he was born in Cumberland County, December 10, 1831. The family is of Scotch origin, and the first American progenitors were early settlers of South Carolina and participants in many of the events which form the colonial history of the south. Jesse Griffin, the grandfather of our subject, was one of the pioneers of Kentucky, where occurred the birth of Burrell Bell Griffin, the father of Joseph. Having arrived at years of maturity he married Miss Sally Thogmorton a native of Tennessee, and a representative of an old family of North Carolina. They became the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom reached years of maturity, while nine are still living. In 1852 the family crossed the plains to Oregon, and settled on the Rogue River, where they took up a government donation claim, upon which the parents spent their remaining days. The father attained the age of seventy-three years, and the mother, surviving him two years, passed away at about the same age. They were members of the Christian church, and were held in the highest regard by their many friends. Mr. Griffin was educated in Missouri and Oregon. He was in his fifteenth year when he arrived in the latter state, and during his boyhood he alternated his lessons with farming and placer mining, early forming the habits of industry and diligence which have characterized his entire life and which have led to his success. From the government he secured a donation claim of three hundred and...

Alturas County, Idaho Census Records

1870 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1870 Alturas County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide Hosted at Alturas County Idaho USGenWeb Census Project Alturas County Idaho Hosted at USGenWeb Idaho Archives Surnames A-B-C Surnames D-E-F-G Surnames H-I-J-K-L Surnames M-N-O-P-Q-R Surnames S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z 1880 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1880 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1880 Alturas County, Census (images and index) 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1880 U.S. Census Guide 1890 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1890 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1890 Veterans Schedule $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems $ Hosted at Census Guide 1890 U.S. Census Guide 1900 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1900 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1900 Alturas County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1900 U.S. Census Guide 1910 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1910 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1910 Alturas County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1910 U.S. Census Guide 1920 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1920 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1920 Alturas County, Census (images and index) $ Hosted at Census Guide 1920 U.S. Census Guide 1930 Alturas County, Idaho Census Free 1930 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1930 Alturas County, Census...

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