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Colorado, Idaho, Kansas and Minnesota Indian Honored War Dead

The following Honored War Dead, are listed by Name, Tribe and Location of death. The name under the photograph is the person shown.  No additional information was provided in the book. Colorado Albert Bos, Ute, Leyte Wilbur Washington, Ute, Italy Elmer Lewis, Navajo Idaho James Burt, Shoshone, Luzon Howard Cutler, Shoshone, Atlantic Stanley George, Shoshone, Europe Matthew Honenah, Shoshone, Europe Nelson Ingawanup, Shoshone, Europe James Mosho, Jr., Shoshone, Europe Adolph Alexie, Coeur D’Alene, Okinawa Kansas William Lasley, Potawatomi, Italy Herbert H. DeRain, Iowa, France Paul G. Wamego, Potawatomi, Germany Edgar H. Goslin, Kickapoo, Pacific Minnesota Daniel McKenzie, Chippewa, Holland James L. Johnson, Chippewa, France Jacob Anderson, Chippewa, France Adolph King, Chippewa, France Lewis E. Taylor, Chippewa, Germany George Sheehy, Chippewa, Italy Francis S. Bushman, Chippewa, Manchukuo James L. Cook, Chippewa, Luzon George Kelly, Chippewa, France Peter Morgan, Chippewa, France Vincent Zimmerman, Chippewa, Europe John S. Mercer, Chippewa, Germany Joseph Weaver, Chippewa, Belgium Ralph Robinson, Chippewa, Germany Richard Johnson, Chippewa, Africa Jesse J. Tibbetts, Chippewa, English Channel Sylvester Charboneau, Chippewa, At Sea Lyman Tanner, Chippewa, Luzon Richard Boshey, Chippewa, Belgium Wesley Eagle, Chippewa, Pacific William Potter, Chippewa, Italy Robert TeJohn, Chippewa, Luzon Hubert Williams, Chippewa, Belgium Richard Sailor, Chippewa, France Martin E. Simons, Chippewa, Pacific Robert Belland, Chippewa, Italy Eddie Brown, Chippewa, Italy George Brunette, Chippewa, USA Dominic Misquadace, Chippewa Lawrence Carl, Chippewa, Luzon Dean Ottershaw, Chippewa, Pacific Clifford John Antell, Chippewa, Pacific Daniel McKenzie, Chippewa Lewis E. Taylor, Chippewa James L. Johnson, Chippewa Lawrence Carl,...

Treaty of October 18, 1848

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Lake Pow-aw-hay-kon-nay, in the State of Wisconsin, on the eighteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and forty-eight, between the United States of America, by William Medill, a commissioner duly appointed for that purpose, and the Menomonee tribe of Indians, by the chiefs, headmen, and warriors of said tribe. Article I. It is stipulated and solemnly agreed that the peace and friendship now so happily subsisting between the Government and people of the United States and the Menomonee Indians shall be perpetual. Article II. The said Menomonee tribe of Indians agree to cede, and do hereby cede, sell, and relinquish to the United States all their lands in the State of Wisconsin, wherever situated. Article III. In consideration of the foregoing cession, the United States agree to give, and do hereby give, to said Indians for a home, to be held as Indians’ lands are held, all that country or tract of land ceded to the said United States by the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, in the treaty of August 2, 1847, and the Pillager band of Chippewa Indians, in the treaty of August 21, 1847, which may not be assigned to be assigned to the Winnebago Indians, under the treaty with that tribe of October 13, 1846, and which is guarantied to contain not less than six hundred thousand acres. Article IV. In further and full consideration of said cession, the United States agree to pay the sum of three hundred and fifty thousand dollars, at the several times, in the manner, and for the...

Biography of Newell H. Webster

Newell H. Webster, now a prominent and affluent resident of Helena, Mont., was born November 29, 1836, in Henniker, a son of Jesse and Susan C. (Newell) Webster. An account of his Newell was known as a remarkably bright lad, showing even then the vigor of intellect and strength of character inherited from his mother. After leaving school he learned the tailor’s trade from his father, subsequently spending two years as a clerk in Boston. His health failing, a change of climate was advised; and, little thinking what the future years had in store for him, he bade farewell to his friends, and started westward, arriving in Minnesota early in 1861. At Hastings he joined a party engaged in surveying for a railway, being employed as chain carrier. His investigating turn of mind and natural desire for knowledge caused him to note the transit’s record in a book of his own. Soon after he became expert in the use of the instruments, whereupon the engineer in charge placed him in charge of the transit. When the surveying in that State was completed, he received and accepted a flattering offer of an engagement in the same line of business in Colorado, where he went in 1863. He was subsequently selected to lead an exploring party into Idaho and Montana; and he was at East Bannack, Montana Territory, when the settlement of the district was beginning. Deciding at once to locate in the new and undeveloped region, Mr. Webster identified himself with its interests. Eventually he established himself in business in the future city of Helena, where he erected the first...

Treaty of September 15, 1832

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Illinois, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, Major General Winfield Scott of the United States’ Army, and his Excellency John Reynolds, Governor of the State of Illinois, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, represented in general Council by the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors. Article I.The Winnebago nation hereby cede to the United States, forever, all the lands, to which said nation have title or claim, lying to the south and east of the Wisconsin river, and the Fox river of Green Bay; bounded as follows, viz: beginning at the mouth of the Pee-keetol a-ka river; thence up Rock river to its source; thence, with a line dividing the Winnebago nation from other Indians east of the Winnebago lake, to the Grande Chûte; thence, up Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and with the northwestern shore of said lake, to the inlet of Fox river; thence, up said river to lake Puckaway, and with the eastern shore of the same to its most southeasterly bend; thence with the line of a purchase made of the Winnebago nation, by the treaty at Prairie du Chêne, the first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, to the place of beginning. Article II.In part consideration of the above cession, it is hereby stipulated and agreed, that the United States grant to the Winnebago nation, to be held as other Indian lands are held, that part of the tract of country on the west side of the Mississippi, known, at present, as the Neutral ground, embraced...

Biographical Sketch of Eric Wold

Eric Wold who has been city engineer of Burlingame for the past four years and at present is also acting in the same capacity for the infant municipality of San Bruno, has been engaged in engineering work the greater part of his life. His college training and wide experience has splendidly fitted him for the important work that he is now doing; while Burlingame’s streets, the water system and other municipal improvements well bespeak Mr. Wold’s ability. Anxious to have their municipality profit from the same competent engineering that Burlingame did, the San Bruno citizens retained Mr. Wold. He is now at work perfecting plans for bridges, street improvements, sidewalks and a water system which when completed will make San Bruno one of the ideal towns of the county. Besides his wide experience as a municipal engineer Mr. Wold has followed his profession in other lines. He was in the service of the government for three years. While engaged in railroad work he made many important locations for the Western Pacific and other lines. Eric Wold was born in Norway on April 5, 1878. While just a child his parents brought him to Quebec and from there they moved to Minnesota where Mr. Wold spent the early part of his life. After graduating from the La Crosse High School at La Crosse, Wisconsin, he entered the University of Minnesota. In 1902 he graduated from the engineering department of this institution. Since then he has been following this profession in different parts of the United States, having been in California for the past ten years. Mr. Wold was married at...

Biography of Dr. F. Holmes Smith

Dr. F. Holmes Smith is a comparatively young man, yet he has already passed through a most interesting career, one phase of which was a stirring trip up into the frozen north where he faithfully followed the call of medical duty in Alaska, upon the shores of the Behring Sea, as the company doctor for the North American Commercial Company. Upon his return to civilization he took up the less arduous duties of a practicing physician and surgeon at San Bruno in 1909. Dr. Smith was born at Lake City, Minnesota, on October 29, 1879, and received his college education at Stanford University, after which he received his doctor’s degree at Cooper Medical College. Thereupon he immediately entered into the practice of medicine, being interned at the French Hospital, where he secured much valuable practical experience. From here he went to Alaska. Upon his return from Alaska he was married in 1911 at San Jose and shortly afterwards decided to throw in his lot with San Mateo County. Following this wise decision he moved to San Bruno and nailed up his shingle. He entered into the life of this thriving town with enthusiasm, with the result that he soon had established a lucrative practice. In a short time he was elected health officer of San Bruno-another result of conscientious attention to his duty. Although deeply interested in his profession, Dr. Smith has not neglected the social side of life. He is a member of the B. P. O. E., 1112 as well as a member of the Masonic Lodge of South San Francisco. Dr. Smith owns property in San...

Biography of Eugene Charlie Cottier

Eugene Charlie Cottier who owns a plumbing and tinning establishment at No. 37 B Street, San Mateo, is a man who did not learn his trade “from the ground up” but “from the box up.” He was just a youngster in short pants when he first took up the solder irons, and in order to work on the high bench he had to stand on a soap box. This old shop in Minneapolis where he learned his primary lessons in the trade, still stands; and Mr. Cottier is still known to the old hands there as the man who learned his trade “from the box up.” The thoroughness with which Mr. Cottier learned his profession is exemplified in his establishment which is one of the most modern and complete in the State. He put in the plumbing in many of the large country places. One of the branches of his establishment is an extensive wholesale department. The pursuit of his chosen profession has taken Mr. Cottier to five different cities since leaving his home in Minnesota twenty-eight years ago. He established himself in Sacramento then sold out and started business in San Francisco. Believing that greater opportunities awaited him in Paso Robles he went there and started a plumbing and hardware store. After devoting several years to this business he disposed of it, to again return to San Francisco. It was here that reverses overtook him, and he came to San Mateo penniless to start anew. Although a total stranger, Mr. Cottier gradually built up a business which although only ten years old, is one of the largest on...

Biographical Sketch of P. P. Chamberlain

Mr. P. P. Chamberlain came to Redwood City in 1868. He accepted the first position that offered and became grocery clerk for Isaac M. Schlouecker. Soon after this he went into the merchandise business with W. J. Wilcox, and after the withdrawal of his partner, carried the business on alone, under the name of P. P. Chamberlain which firm is still in existence. During early days of the grocery business, Mr. Chamberlain was elected county treasurer which office he has faithfully administered for more than thirty years. Mr. Chamberlain is interested in the Redwood City Building and Loan Association and the Redwood City Realty Company. He has always taken an active interest in the social side of city and county life, and now although seventy-four years old, he may still be seen enjoying himself at public functions, dances and receptions. He takes a keen interest in fishing. He is a member of the San Mateo B. P. O. Elks. Mr. Chamberlain’s boyhood life was spent in Ohio from which he went into the wilderness of Minnesota, and lived the rough and ready life of the lumber camps before he journeyed westward and threw in his lot with the old timers at Redwood City. He brought west with him an enviable record as a...

Gowen, Francis Marion – Obituary

Francis M. Gowen, 72, prominent dairyman and farmer, died suddenly last evening at his home on Route 1, Chehalis. He was born in Rice County, Minnesota, July 31, 1869, and came to Lewis County in 1893. He was a member of the Grange and of the Modern Woodmen. Surviving are his wife, Melissa [Champ]; two sons, Dewey, Chehalis, and Myron Gowen, Centralia; four daughters, Mrs. Pearl Hammack, Castle Rock; Mrs. Violet Hart, Bucoda; Mrs. Daisey Campbell, Chehalis, and Mrs. Ruby Bruce, Portland; sister, Mrs. W. E. Smith, Toledo, and five grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the John W. Boone Chapel. Burial will be at Claquato. Contributed by: Shelli...

Wolfe, Edith May Byram – Obituary

Edith May Byram, daughter of Rev. F. N. and Tabitha [McEwen] Byram, was born in Murray County, Minn., May 14, 1872, and in 1874 removed with her father’s family to Fremont, Iowa. Here she attended school and grew to womanhood, and was married to F. Wolfe on December 13, 1892. To this union four children were born – Walter Rex, Carl Vernon, Ralph Donavan, and infant daughter Marjorie Bitha, who with the bereaved husband a a large circle of friends and relatives, are left to mourn her untimely death; yet they mourn not as those that have no hope. The deceased made a public confession of faith in Christ at the age of sixteen years and was baptized into the fellowship of the Fremont Baptist Church, of which she remained a member until after her marriage, when, with her husband, she became a member of the Highland Church in which fellowship she remained until called to the church triumphant. She died Wednesday morning, Jan. 13, 19009, aged 26 years, 7 months and 29 days. A faithful wife, and affectionate mother and kind neighbor has gone to rest. The funeral was held Friday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock at the Fremont Baptist church and was conducted by Pastor Brown, who spoke from the text found in Rev. 3:4. Interment was made in the Cedar Township Cemetery. Those from a distance who attended the funeral were: Miss Emma Wolfe, Marshalltown; Mrs. A. Scott, Messina; Mr. and Mrs. Will Sisco, Cedar; Jink Wolfe and children, Kirkville; Mrs. Lizzie Pickering, Hedrick; Rev. and Mrs. F. N. Byram and Kenneth and Hollis Byram, Sigourney; Mr....
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