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Early New England People

Sarah Titcomb over her years of study of various New England families had collected quite a bit of material of several early New England families. At the bequest of some of her friends, she prepared and published them in book form. When reading through the material I was impressed with the amount of material collected on each individual, and rather then a brief genealogical sketch, readers are provided an in-depth study of each early family: Ayer, Bartlett, Bradley, Chase, Dean, Dow, Dunster, Ellis, Fuller, Hope, Kilby, Martine, Les Dernier, Maverick, Mills, Montague, Pemberton, Pepperrell, Poore, Precott, Sewall, Longfellow, Spofford, Titcomb, Watmough, and Willard.

Record of Connecticut Men in the War of 1812

Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army and the Militia in the War of 1812 compiled from rosters on file in Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington D. C. by authority of the general assembly Record of Connecticut Militia in the War of 1812 compiled from rosters on file in Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington D. C. Abbreviations Record of Connecticut Militia in the War of 1812 Record of Connecticut Men in the Regular Army, War of 1812 Officers Enlisted Men...

Record of Service of Connecticut Men in the War of the Revolution

The several rolls and lists in the following pages have been arranged chronologically according to the description of the service in which the troops engaged. Thus, after the first alarm, the Continental soldiers are classified in the order in which they were called out, then the State troops, and finally the Militia, with special lists following. Index to Record of Revolutionary Service Index to Military History – Battles, Camps, Orders The Lexington Alarm The first lists in the record, grouped under the head of the “Out-break of the War,” include the names of the men who, under the provocation of the moment, marched to the relief of their Massachusetts neighbors in the Lexington Alarm. Some explanation of the nature of this service appears in the introductory text on pages 3 and 4. It will be observed that the forty-eight towns from which the companies set out represent, with three exceptions, the eastern and central counties, which were then the thickly settled sections of the State, the nearest to the point of danger, the best prepared for an emergency, and the most accessible in case of alarm. It may also be noticed that the four thousand townsmen who responded to the Lexington call were a representative body, largely descendants of original settlers, including all elements in the different communities, — judges, pastors, lawyers, physicians, farmers, mechanics, sailors, laborers, — and that as a list of a respectable number of the male inhabitants of the State in 1775, which may be utilized in historical and genealogical researches, a peculiar interest attaches to it. Following in their proper place are the names...

Record of Connecticut Men in the Mexican War

Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War compiled from rosters on file in Adjutant-General’s Office, Washington D. C. by authority of the general assembly Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 171 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 172 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 173 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 174 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 175 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 176 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 177 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 178 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 179 Record of Connecticut men who served in the Regular Army during the Mexican War Page 180...

Indian Wars of New England

To the student of Indian history of the early New England period the catalog of the librarian would allow one to infer that the ground had been already preempted by Mr. William Hubbard and some other well-known writers upon the tragedies of the early New England days, whose labors are more famous for being a quaint reflection of the times than for comprehensive treatment of the subject at hand. Without Mr. Drake’s labors, allied to those of Church and Belknap, the earlier story would be a meager one. It is to these authors one goes with assurance and infinite satisfaction, and one feels safe in accepting them as authorities upon the matters of which they write. Mr. Hubbard, who is most tedious in his narrative, leaves one at the threshold of Mr. Penhallow’s “Relation, “which brings one to the verge of 1726; while Mr. Palfrey’s consideration of the events which limit the scope of the present work is general rather than subjective. Unquestionably, Mr. Palfrey offers very little of the conflicts of the English settler with the Indians. His objective was a “History of New England,” to which the depredations of the Indians were necessarily incidental. With Gardener’s “Pequod Wars” and Church’s “Philip’s War” is ushered in a decade of peaceful years, the termination of which leaves one upon the threshold of a most sanguinary conflict which broke out anew in 1688, and in which the stage of activities was shifted from the purlieus of Mount Hope1 to the northern boundaries of New Hampshire and eastward about the marshes of old Scarborough and the islands of Merrymeeting Bay. Isolate...

Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society

From 1860 to 1930 The Connecticut Historical Society published a series containing items from their collection of historical documents. The following are the 24 volumes of their works freely made available online. To assist the researcher with determining the contents for each volume, we’ve included such in the description. Connecticut genealogists will want to pay particular attention to Volumes 8-10, 12, 14, and 22. Willis and Wyllys family researchers, who descend from George Wyllys will be ecstatic over volume 21. And to our Native American friends, volumes 2 and 3 contain some information on early Connecticut Indians. Collections of the Connecticut Historical Society: Volume 1 Rev. Thomas Hooker’s Letter to Governor Winthrop, 1638 Abstracts of Two Sermons by Rev. Thomas Hooker, in the Years 1638, 1639 Trial of Ezekiel Cheever before the New Haven Church, 1649 An account of the trial of Ezekiel Cheever, before the Church at New Haven, is printed from a contemporary manuscript, supposed to be by Cheever himself. Letter from Governor Winthrop Respecting the Charter of Connecticut, 1662 The People’s Right to Election, by Gershom Bulkeley, 1689 Their Majesties Colony of Connecticut Vindicated, 1745 Connecticut Officers at Louisbourg A List of the officers in the Connecticut Regiment, under the command of Lt. General Pepperell, at the Reduction of Louisbourg and Territories depending, to the obedience of his Britannick Majesty, and garrisoned the same until relieved by the British troops. Papers Relating to the Ticonderoga Expedition, 1775 Journal of Captain Edward Mott: An interesting narrative of the origin, progress, and successful result of the expedition from Connecticut, for the reduction of Ticonderoga and Crown Point. Major...
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