Alabama


Autauga County Alabama Records at ADAH

This database contains records from local, county and municipal offices, such as the probate office, tax assessor, and orphan’s court. Most of the original records remain in the originating office. The following results reflect the records available at the Alabama Department of Archives and History Center (ADAH) specifically for Autauga County. In order to view any of the following Autauga County Alabama records the researcher would need to visit the ADAH in person, or hire a researcher to perform the task for them, or visit the specific originating office for the record.



Native American History of Autauga County, Alabama

Autauga County is located in central Alabama. Its county seat is Prattville. The county was named after the Tawasee Indian town of Atagi, whose location is its southeastern corner. Autauga County is part of the Montgomery, Alabama Metropolitan Statistical Area. The county was created in 1818 from lands forcibly ceded by the Creek Confederacy in



Autauga County Alabama Officials 1819-1870

James Jackson represented the county in the constitutional convention of 1819; George Rives, sr., in that of 1861; and Benjamin Fitzpatrick in that of 1865, over which he presided. The following is a list of the members of the general assembly from the county 1819-Howell Rose. 1822-Dunklin Sullivan. 1825-James Jackson. 1828-William R. Pickett. 1831-William R.



The Seminole War of 1816 and 1817 – Indian Wars

Colonel Clinch

After the close of the war with Great Britain, in 1815, when the British forces were withdrawn from the Florida’s, Edward Nicholls, formerly a colonel, and James Woodbine, a captain in the British service, who had both been engaged in exciting the Indians and Blacks to hostility, remained in the territory for the purpose of



The Creek War – Indian Wars

General Jackson

In the spring of the year 1812, the southern Indian tribal were visited by the bold and enterprising Tecumseh. His stirring appeals to their patriotism and valor were heard with attention, and he succeeded in stimulating them to open hostility. It is to be regretted that no specimen of the orations of this great Indian



The English In Georgia

We have shown that South Carolina had been established as a colony for some years, that its seat of government was at Charleston, and that its inhabitants, in endeavoring to extend the English trade to all the Western Indian nations as far as the Mississippi river, had many conflicts and difficulties with the French, who



Terrible Massacre at Fort Mims

In the meantime, the wealthy half-bloods about Little river had dropped down the Alabama, in their boats, and had secreted themselves in the swamp about Lake Tensaw. Uniting with the whites, they soon began the construction of a fort around the residence of Samuel Mims, a wealthy Indian countryman, to whom we have often alluded,



Map of Fort Mims

Map of Fort Mims

A copy of a map of Fort Mims. This map was found among the papers of General Claiborne. Block house. Pickets cut away by the Indians. Guard’s Station. Guard House. Western Gate. This Gate was shut, but a hole was cut by the Indians. Captain Bailey’s Station. Steadham’s House. Mrs. Dyer’s House Kitchen. Mims’ House.



Terrible Massacre At Natchez

The colony of Louisiana was now in a flourishing condition; its fields were cultivated by more than two thousand Negroes; cotton, indigo, tobacco and grain were produced; skins and furs of all descriptions were obtained in a traffic with the Indians; and lumber was extensively exported to the West India islands. The province was protected by eight hundred troops of the line; but the bloody massacre of the French population of Fort Rosalie, at the Natchez, arrested these rapid strides of prosperity, and shrouded all things in sadness and gloom. Our library contains many accounts of this horrible affair, which harmonize very well with each other; but in reference to the causes which led to it, more particularly, we propose to introduce the statement of Le Page Du Pratz, who was residing in Louisiana at the time.



Battle of Burnt Corn

Map of the War in South Alabama 1813-1814

Peter McQueen, at the head of the Tallase warriors; High Head Jim, with the Autaugas, and Josiah Francis, with the Alabamas, numbering in all three hundred and fifty, departed for Pensacola with many pack-horses. On their way they beat and drove off all the Indians who would not take the war talk. The brutal McQueen



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