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Condition of the Mississippi Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Mississippi, counted in the general census, number 2,030 (1,044 males and 992 females), and are distributed as follows: Attala County, 24; Greene County, 37; Hancock County, 39; Hinds County, 14; Jasper County, 179; Kemper County, 34; Lauderdale County, 14; Leake County, 435; Neshoba, County, 623; Newton County, 349; Perry County, 38; Scott County, 123; Sharkey County 12; Winston County, 41; other counties (9 or less in each), 74. To the east of the gate capital in Mississippi in the uplands are a number of counties not traversed by any railroad, and therefore locally known as cow counties from their dependence for communication on roads and trails, suggestive of cow paths. The greater part of the Indians of the state are out in contiguous cow counties. They are remnants of The Five Civilized Tribes, mainly Choctaws, descendants in part of those who originally were found in this region and did not go west of the Mississippi river, and partly representing those who from time to, time have returned from the west. These people generally own little patches of a few acres, which they cultivate and add to their means of living by working for others, hunting, and some simple handicraft. In the spring they go into the larger towns to dispose of such pelts as they may have collected and sell baskets made in considerable numbers from the cane. White, boys in the towns at the season are generally supplied with blowguns, made by these Indians from the hollow cane stems, and furnished with darts fitted with feathers or cotton down. Wild blackberries for a...

Michigan, Minnesota, and Mississippi Indians Wounded in Action

The following Indians Wounded in Action, are listed by Name, Tribe and Location of death. The name under the photograph is the person shown.  No additional information was provided in the book. Michigan Irving J. Theodore, Saginaw, Pacific Thurlow McClellan, Ottawa-Chippewa, Palaus Minnesota Daniel Bellanger, Chippewa, France John Northrup, Chippewa, France Eugene Johnson, Chippewa, Cassino Jimmie Lussier, Chippewa Harry Fairbanks, Chippewa, France William Jourdain, Chippewa Maurice Kelley, Chippewa, Germany Stanley Nordwall, Chippewa Johnson Ray, Chippewa, Germany Simon Desjarlait, Chippewa, Belgium Delmar Needham, Chippewa George L. Mason, Chippewa, Germany Wallace D. Stewart, Chippewa, France William Good, Chippewa, Germany Raymond F. Roberts, Chippewa, France Robert King, Chippewa, France Harry Smith, Chippewa, France Frank N. Lajeunesse, Chippewa, Normandy Fran A. Toutloff, Chippewa, Pacific George H. Trombley, Chippewa, Luzon Edward George Burns, Chippewa, Guam Herbert Beaulieu, Chippewa, Germany Albert Whitecloud, Chippewa, New Guinea Louis Livingston, Chippewa, Leyte John Davis, Chippewa, France James Deschamps, Chippewa, France Mark Naganub, Chippewa Jeffrey Duhaime, Chippewa Stephen Zimmerman, Chippewa, Leyte Lloyd Para, Chippewa, Germany Andrew Amyotte, Chippewa William Amyotte, Chippewa Eugene Amyotte, Chippewa Burdette Shearer, Chippewa, Germany Louis Dunn, Chippewa, Germany Phillip Ray, Chippewa, Luzon Everett Ojibway, Chippewa, Germany Eugene Savage, Chippewa, Germany Gerald Sheehy, Chippewa, Italy Clifford Danielson, Chippewa, Italy Robert Wendling, Chippewa, Germany Eugene Howes, Chippewa, Italy William Howes, Chippewa, Pacific Mississippi Frank Billy, Choctaw, Pacific Bethany Morris, Choctaw, Europe Hudson Tubby, Choctaw, Europe Willie Thompson, Choctaw, Europe Sidney Wilson, Choctaw, Europe J.C. Willis, Choctaw, Mediterranean John Lee Gibson, Choctaw, Europe Frank N. Lajeunesse, Chippewa Thurlow McClellan, Ottawa-Chippewa Raymond F. Roberts, Chippewa Daniel Bellanger, Chippewa William Good,...

Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska and Nevada Indian Honored War Dead

The following Honored War Dead, are listed by Name, Tribe and Location of death. The name under the photograph is the person shown.  No additional information was provided in the book. Mississippi Bob Allen, Choctaw, Solomons Gibson T. McMillan, Choctaw, Luzon Emmett Jackson, Choctaw, Germany Able Sam, Choctaw, Germany John Day Isaac, Choctaw, U.S.A. Raymond Martin, Choctaw, Germany Montana Murray L. Williamson, Blackfoot, Luzon Fredrick Bauer, Jr. Sioux Luzon Sam Davis Backwards Cheyenne Luzon George B. Magee, Jr. Blackfoot France U. S. A. Wilbur Spang, Cheyenne, Flathead, Germany Daniel L. Pablo, Flathead, Germany Warren L. Gardipe, Flathead, Philippines Leonard R. Jette, Flathead, Joseph O. Pronovost, Flathead, Pacific William Pronovost, Flathead Louis C. Charlo, Flathead, Iwo Jima Oswald A. Felsman, Flathead, France Pascal Bohn, Flathead, Belgium Julian A. Pablo, Flathead, Philippines Clarence I. Marengo, Flathead, Italy Elmer C. Ladue, Flathead Fredrick E. Kasko, Flathead Isaac Mott, Flathead, Germany Elvin Matt, Flathead Germany Harvey W. Ducharme, Flathead, Germany Francis Heavyrunner, Blackfoot, France Eugene Horn, Blackfoot, Leyte William Wolftail, Blackfoot, France Fred DeRoche Blackfoot, Belgium Patrick Reevis, Blackfoot, Luzon William Allison, Jr. Blackfoot, Germany Charles Stewart, Blackfoot, Pacific Roger K. Paul, Blackfoot, France Melvin Rides at the Door, Blackfoot, Germany Joseph Long Knife, Assiniboine, Luzon Benjamin Chopwood, Assiniboine, Italy Pius Wing, Assiniboine, France Richard King, Jr., Assiniboine, France Murphy Gunn, Assiniboine, Pacific Nebraska Thomas H. Harrison, Winnebago, France Nevada Seymour Arnot, Washoe, Pacific Stanley Winnemucca, Paiute Francis Shaw, Paiute, Africa Henry West, Jr., Paiute Scott Green, Paiute Arthur F. Jones, Paiute, Africa Mike Drew, Paiute, Italy Edward Joe, Washoe, Peleliu Sidney Jack, Paiute, Europe Clarence Hanks, Paiute, Europe Warren Wilson, Paiute, Pacific...

Case Findings on the McKennon Roll

The following are various US Supreme Court case findings concerning the McKennon Roll. U.S. Supreme Court Winton V. Amos, 255 U.S. 373 (1921) 255 U.S. 373 Winton et al. V. Amos et al. No. 6. Bounds V. Same. No. 7. London V. Same. No. 8. Field Et Al. V. Same. No. 9. Beckham V. Same. No. 10. Vernon V. Same. No. 11. Howe V. Same. No. 12. Argued Jan. 14 and 15, 1919 Restored to Docket for Reargument Jan. 5, 1920. Reargued April 21 and 22, 1920. Decided March 7, 1921. [255 U.S. 373, 375]   Mr. William W. Scott, of Washington, D. C., for appellants Winton and others. Mr. Guion Miller, of Baltimore, Md., for other appellants. Mr. Assistant Attorney General Davis, for the United States. Mr. Justice PITNEY delivered the opinion of the Court. These are appeals from a judgment of the Court of Claims rejecting claims for alleged services rendered and expenses incurred in the matter of the claims of the Mississippi Choctaws to citizenship in the Choctaw Nation. The decision of the Court of Claims is reported in 51 Ct. Cl. 284. In the Winton Case (No. 6), a request for additional findings, equivalent to an application for rehearing, was denied, 52 Ct. Cl. 90. The appeals were taken under section 182, Jud. Code (Comp. St. 1173). The jurisdiction of the court below arose under an Act of April 26, 1906 (chapter 1876, 9, 34 Stat. 137, 140), and an [255 U.S. 373, 376] amendatory provision in the Act of May 29, 1908 (chapter 216, 27, 35 Stat. 444, 457). The former provided: ‘That the...

Biographical Sketch of Paul Pinckney

Under the head of “The Press” comes the name of Paul Pinckney, one of the foremost newspaper men of the county, and editor and proprietor of the San Mateo Times. Mr. Pinckney was born in South Carolina on March 24, 1869. His early education was accomplished in the common-schools and supplemented by a course under private tutors. At fifteen, instead of going to college he decided to see the world as both his parents had passed away. Ever since this he has “been seeing the world” through the eyes of a newspaper man, serving in the capacity of both reporter and editor. He was the editor for two years of the Southern Home Journal, a literary magazine of Jackson, Mississippi;, whence it was moved to Memphis, Tennessee. He served three years in the Spanish American War in the Philippines as steward in the medical department, being called upon to act in many responsible capacities. After the war he was reporter on the San Francisco Chronicle, going from this position to San Mateo, where on September 12, 1903 he acquired a half interest in the San Mateo Times and made that sheet a prosperous one. In 1910 he purchased Mr. Henry Thiel’s interest, and became sole owner. Mr. Pinckney helped to organize the San Mateo Board of Trade In 1905, now the Chamber of Commerce, and has been Its secretary ever since. In 1906 he helped organize the San Mateo Hotel Company, operating the Peninsula Hotel, the enterprise being capitalized at $600,000. He became the secretary, and later, one of the...

Mississippi Cemetery Records

Mississippi Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Mississippi county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Mississippi Cemetery Records Hinds to Pearl River CountyMississippi Cemetery Records, Adams to HarrisonMississippi Cemetery Transcriptions, Perry to TippahMississippi Cemetery Transcriptions, Tishomingo to...

Natchez Burial Customs

When referring to the burial customs of the Natchez, that most interesting of the many tribes of the lower Mississippi Valley, the early writers by whom the tribe was visited seldom alluded to the rites which attended the final disposition of the remains of the less important members of the nation, but devoted themselves to describing the varied and sanguinary ceremonies enacted at the time of the death and burial of a Sun. Swanton has already brought together the various accounts and descriptions of these most unusual acts, and consequently they need not be repeated at the present time. Nevertheless the first two will be quoted to serve as means of comparing the remarkable ceremonies followed by members of this tribe with the manners and customs of their neighbors. Of the two accounts given below, Swanton said ” The first was given to Gravier by the French youth whom Iberville left in 1700 to learn the Natchez language, and the second details the obsequies of a grand chieftainess of which the author Penicaut claims to have been a witness in 1704.” The Frenchman whom M. d’Iberville left there to learn the language told me that on the death of the last chief they put to death two women, three men, and three children. They strangled them with a bowstring, and this cruel ceremony was performed with great pomp, these wretched victims deeming themselves greatly honored to accompany their chief by a violent death. There were only seven for the great chief who died some months before. His wife, better advised than the others, did not wish to follow him,...

Choctaw Burial Customs

Thus the greater part of the southern country was claimed and occupied by tribes belonging to the Muskhogean group, who were first encountered by the Spanish explorers of the early sixteenth century, and who continued to occupy the region until removed during the first half of the nineteenth century. For three centuries they are known to have remained within the same limited area. On the west were the Choctaw, whose villages extended over a large part of the present State of Mississippi and eastward into Alabama. And to this tribe should undoubtedly be attributed the many burial mounds now encountered within the bounds of their ancient territory, but the remains as now found embedded in a mass of sand and earth forming the mound represent only one, the last, phase of the ceremonies which attended the death and burial of the Choctaw. These as witnessed and described by Bartram were quite distinct. “As soon as a person is dead, they erect a scaffold eighteen or twenty feet high, in a grove adjacent to the town, where they lay the corpse lightly covered with a mantle; here it is suffered to remain, visited and protected by the friends and relations, until the flesh becomes putrid, so as easily to part from the bones; then undertakers, who made it their business, carefully strip the flesh from the bones, wash and cleanse them, and when dry and purified by the air, having provided a curiously wrought chest or coffin, fabricated of bones and splints, they place all the bones therein; it is then deposited in the bone house, a building erected for...

Mississippi World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Mississippi World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Mississippi Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 601 Prison Camp 22 Missing 9 Wounded 904 Released Prisoners 80 Total 1616 Mississippi World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Mississippi WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...
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