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Biographical Sketch of Eugene Fuller

Of EUGENE FULLER, the second child of Timothy Fuller and Margaret Crane, the following notice taken from the annual obituary college record, by Joseph Palmer, M.D., published by the “Boston Daily Advertiser,” gives some account: – “Eugene Fuller, the eldest son of Hon. Timothy and Margaret (Crane) Fuller, was born in Cambridge, Mass., May 14, 1815. After leaving college in 1834, he studied law, partly at the Dane Law School in Cambridge, and partly in the office of George Frederick Farley, Esq., of Groton, Mass. After his admission to the bar, he practiced his profession two years in Charlestown, Mass. He afterwards went to New Orleans, and was connected with the public press of that city. He spent several summers there, and, some two or three years ago was affected by sun-stroke, which resulted in softening of the brain, and ultimately in a brain fever, which came very near proving fatal, and left him in a shattered condition. His friends hoping that medical treatment at the north might benefit him, he embarked, with an attendant, on board the Empire City for New York. When one day out, June 21, 1859, his attendant being prostrated with seasickness, Mr. Fuller was left alone, and was not afterwards seen. He must have been lost...

Louisiana Genealogy at Ancestry

Ancestry is the largest provider of genealogy data online. The billions of records they provide have advanced genealogy online beyond imagination just a decade ago. The following is but a small sample of what they provide for Louisiana genealogy at Ancestry. While some of these databases are free, many require a subscription. You can try a 14 day free trial and see if you can find any of your Louisiana genealogy at Ancestry! Louisiana Genealogy Databases – Subscription May be Required Ancestry Free Trial Louisiana Statewide Genealogy at Ancestry En Louisiane : l History of Louisiana Inventory of the church and synagogue archives of Louisiana. Inventory of the municipal archives of Louisiana. Land Claims in Mississippi Territory, 1789-1834 Louisiana Biographical and Historical Memoirs Louisiana Census Records. Volume I: Avoyelles and St. Landry Parishes, 1810 and 1820 Louisiana Census Records. Volume II: Iberville, Natchitoches, Pointe Coupee, and Rapides Parishes, 1810 and 1820 Louisiana Census, 1791-1890 Louisiana Colonials Louisiana Freed Slave Records, 1719-1820 Louisiana History, 1904 Louisiana Marriage Records, 1851-1900 Louisiana Marriages to 1850 Louisiana Marriages, 1718-1925 Louisiana Slave Records, 1719-1820 Louisiana studies : literature, customs and dialects, history and education Louisiana Troops 1720-1770 Louisiana, Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, Pre-1908 Louisiana, Naturalization Records,1836-2001 Louisiana, Statewide Death Index, 1900-1949 Louisiane et Texas Marriage contracts of French colonial Louisiana Old Families of Louisiana Old Louisiana plantation homes and family trees Southwest Louisiana, Deaths Index, 1840-1906 The Creoles of Louisiana The history of Louisiana : particularly of the cession of that colony to the United States of America : with an introductory es The history of Louisiana from the earliest period Web: Louisiana, Find A Grave...

Biloxi and Pascagoula Burial Customs

The “Siouan Tribes of the East,” whose burial customs so far as known are detailed on the preceding pages, were carefully studied some years ago, at which time all available notes were gathered and presented in a single volume. A few years before the preparation of this most interesting bulletin a discovery of the greatest importance was made by another member of the bureau staff, Mr. Gatschet, who, while engaged in Louisiana in 1886, discovered a small band of Biloxi, some of whom spoke their old language, which Gatschet soon found was Siouan. The Biloxi therefore belonged to the great Siouan family, and the neighboring Pascagoula were probably of the same stock. These were among the first of the native tribes encountered by the French in 1699, and, fortunately, a sketch of their burial customs has been preserved. The account was written by a French officer about the year 1730, and, as quoted by Swanton, reads: ” The Paskagoulas and the Billoxis never inter their chief when he is dead, but they have his body dried in the fire and smoke so that they make of it a veritable skeleton. After having reduced it to this condition they carry it to the temple (for they have one as well as the Natchez) and put it in the place occupied by its predecessor, which they take from the place which it occupied to place it with the bodies of their other chiefs in the interior of the temple, where they are all ranged in succession on their feet like statues. With regard to the one last dead, it is exposed...

Colorado, Idaho, Kansas and Louisiana Indians Wounded in Action

The following Indians Wounded in Action, are listed by Name, Tribe and Location of death. The name under the photograph is the person shown.  No additional information was provided in the book. Colorado Anthony Burch, Ute, Belgium Allen Carel, Ute, Holland John Werito, Navajo, Pacific Curtis Toledo, Navajo, Pacific Raymond Lopez, Navajo, Pacific Idaho Lawrence Bagley, Shoshone, Europe Eldon Blackhawk, Shoshone, Europe Waimmie Chedahap, Shoshone, Bannock, Europe Kenneth Cosgrove, Shoshone-Bannock, Europe Roger E. Gallaway, Shoshone, Europe Franklin Hootchew, Shoshone-Bannock, Europe Orlin Judson, Sioux, Europe Kenneth Kutch, Shoshone-Bannock, Europe Herbert LeClair, Shoshone, Europe Thomas LaVatta, Shoshone, Europe Layton Littlejohn, Bannock, Europe Steve Perdash, Shoshone, Europe Vern Panzo, Shoshone, Iwo Jima John B. Riley, Shoshone, Pacific Jarvis Roubidoux, Shoshone, Pacific Kansas Milton LaClair, Potawatomi, France James Kagmega (Kegg), Potawatomi, France Orlando, P. Green Potawatomi, Germany Elwin Shopteese, Potawatomi, France Edward Rice, Potawatomi, Pacific Louisiana Abel John, Coushatta, Pacific Ira B. John, Coushatta, Pacific Solomon Batiste, Coushatta, Pacific Albert Williams, Coushatta, Europe Newton Williams, Coushatta, Europe Gilbert Abbey, Coushatta,...

Brighter Skies

“Out of this nettle, danger,” says the great bard, “we pluck this flower, safety.” The dreadful scourge of 1853 roused the people of New Orleans, for the first time, to the necessity of knowing the proven truth concerning themselves and the city in which they dwelt. In the midst of the epidemic, the city council had adjourned, and a number of its members had fled. But, in response to popular demand, a board of health had appointed the foremost advocates of quarantine and municipal cleansing a commission to study and report the melancholy lessons of the plague. It labored arduously for many months. At its head was that mayor of New Orleans, Crossman by name, whose fame for wise and protracted rule is still a pleasant tradition of the city, and whose characteristic phrase-“a great deal to be said on both sides”-remains the most frequent quotation on the lips of the common people to-day. Doctors Barton, Axson, McNeil, Symonds, and Riddell,-men at the head of the medical profession,-completed the body. They were bold and faithful, and they effected a revolution. The thinking and unbiased few, who in all communities, must first receive and fructify the germ of truth, were convinced. The technical question of the fever’s contagiousness remained unsettled; but its transportability was fearfully proven in a multitude of interior towns, and its alacrity in seeking foul quarters and its malignancy there were plainly shown by its history in the city. The commission pronounced in favor of quarantine, and it was permanently established, and has ever since become, annually, more and more effective. They earnestly recommended, also, the purging...

Who are the Creoles?

Take the map of Louisiana. Draw a line from the southwestern to the northeastern corner of the State; let it turn thence down the Mississippi to the little river-side town of Baton Rouge, the State’s seat of government; there draw it eastward through lakes Maurepas, Pontchartrain, and Borgne, to the Gulf of Mexico; thence pass along the Gulf coast back to the starting-point at the month of the Sabine, and you will have compassed rudely, but accurately enough, the State’s eighteen thousand seven hundred and fifty square miles of delta lands. About half the State lies outside these bounds and is more or less hilly. Its population is mainly an Anglo-American moneyed and landed class, and the blacks and mulattoes who were once its slaves. The same is true of the population in that part of the delta lands north of Red River. The Creoles are not there. Across the southern end of the State, from Sabine Lake to Chandeleur Bay, with a north-and-south width of from ten to thirty miles and an average of about fifteen, stretch the Gulf marshes, the wild haunt of myriads of birds and water-fowl, serpents and saurians, hares, raccoons, wild-eats, deep-bellowing frogs, and clouds of insect, and by a few hunters and oystermen, whose solitary and rarely frequented huts speck the wide, green horizon at remote intervals. Neither is the home of the Creoles to be found here. North of these marshes and within the bounds already set lie still two other sorts of delta country. In these dwell most of the French-speaking people of Louisiana, both white and colored. Here the names...

Natchez Burial Customs

When referring to the burial customs of the Natchez, that most interesting of the many tribes of the lower Mississippi Valley, the early writers by whom the tribe was visited seldom alluded to the rites which attended the final disposition of the remains of the less important members of the nation, but devoted themselves to describing the varied and sanguinary ceremonies enacted at the time of the death and burial of a Sun. Swanton has already brought together the various accounts and descriptions of these most unusual acts, and consequently they need not be repeated at the present time. Nevertheless the first two will be quoted to serve as means of comparing the remarkable ceremonies followed by members of this tribe with the manners and customs of their neighbors. Of the two accounts given below, Swanton said ” The first was given to Gravier by the French youth whom Iberville left in 1700 to learn the Natchez language, and the second details the obsequies of a grand chieftainess of which the author Penicaut claims to have been a witness in 1704.” The Frenchman whom M. d’Iberville left there to learn the language told me that on the death of the last chief they put to death two women, three men, and three children. They strangled them with a bowstring, and this cruel ceremony was performed with great pomp, these wretched victims deeming themselves greatly honored to accompany their chief by a violent death. There were only seven for the great chief who died some months before. His wife, better advised than the others, did not wish to follow him,...

Choctaw Burial Customs

Thus the greater part of the southern country was claimed and occupied by tribes belonging to the Muskhogean group, who were first encountered by the Spanish explorers of the early sixteenth century, and who continued to occupy the region until removed during the first half of the nineteenth century. For three centuries they are known to have remained within the same limited area. On the west were the Choctaw, whose villages extended over a large part of the present State of Mississippi and eastward into Alabama. And to this tribe should undoubtedly be attributed the many burial mounds now encountered within the bounds of their ancient territory, but the remains as now found embedded in a mass of sand and earth forming the mound represent only one, the last, phase of the ceremonies which attended the death and burial of the Choctaw. These as witnessed and described by Bartram were quite distinct. “As soon as a person is dead, they erect a scaffold eighteen or twenty feet high, in a grove adjacent to the town, where they lay the corpse lightly covered with a mantle; here it is suffered to remain, visited and protected by the friends and relations, until the flesh becomes putrid, so as easily to part from the bones; then undertakers, who made it their business, carefully strip the flesh from the bones, wash and cleanse them, and when dry and purified by the air, having provided a curiously wrought chest or coffin, fabricated of bones and splints, they place all the bones therein; it is then deposited in the bone house, a building erected for...

Louisiana World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in this Louisiana World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent only those on active duty in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, resulting directly from enemy action or from operational activities against the enemy in war zones from December 7, 1941, to the end of the war. Casualties in the United States area or as a result of disease, homicide or suicide in any location is not included. This is a state summary taken from casualty lists released by the Navy Department, corrected as to the most recent casualty status and recorded residence of next of kin. Personnel listed as MISSING are under continuous investigation by the Navy Department, and therefore will be officially presumed or determined dead. Some will be found alive. The last official notice to next of kin will take precedence over this list. Compiled, February 1946 Louisiana Summary of War Casualties Dead: Combat 1019 Prison Camp 18 Missing 14 Wounded 1351 Released Prisoners 95 Total 2497 Louisiana World War 2 NMCG Casualty List Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – A Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – B Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – C Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – D Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – E Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List – F Surnames Louisiana WW2 NMCG Casualty List –...

Louisiana Cemetery Records

Louisiana Cemetery records are listed by parish then name of cemetery within the Louisiana parish. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing.

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