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Higbee Graveyard Madison Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Higbee Cemetery, Madison, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the WPA cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project, created to provide employment opportunities during the depression, these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Davidson, Thomas, Apr 22 1767 – Jan 11 1829 Edwards, James, Sr., d. Jul 14 1818, in his 50th year Elvin, Mary Josephine, d/o Robert J. & Esther, d. Jun 9 1845, age 1y 5m 27d Elvin, William Augustus, d/o same, d. May 12 1851, age 5y 5m 25d Elvin, Jesse Hubbard, d/o same, d. Jul 3 1855, age 2y 8m 14d Elvin, Mary Belle, d/o same, d. Jul 14 1863, age 7y 10m 27d Higbee, Josiah, b. New Jersey, Apr 18 1790 – Sep 19 1865, in his 76th yr Higbee, Jerusha, w/o Josiah, b. in Gloucester Co., New Jersey Sep 24 1795, d. in Jefferson Co., Ind Nov 1 1852 Higbee, Jesse, s/o Jos. & Jer. Higbee, d. Aug 5 1857, age 32 yrs Higbee, Jeremiah, s/o same, d. Jul 3 1849, age 29 yrs Higbee, Augustus S., s/o same, d. Feb 15 1849, age 32 yrs Higbee, Japhet, Sep 30 1830 – Oct 30 1918 Hubbard, Caroline, d/o Josiah & Jerusha Higbee, w/o Richard, d. Aug 5 1852, age 24y Logan, W....

Biography of Prof. George Bush

George Bush, one of the most eminent Biblical scholars and Orientalists of his time in America, was born in Norwich, Vt., June 12, 1796, a son of John and Abigal (Marvin) Bush, and grandson of Capt. Timothy Bush. The boyhood of George Bush was mostly passed in Hanover, New Hampshire, whither his father removed when he was quite young. The son gave early indications of superior intelligence. His eldest sister says “he had a ravishing love of books from her first remembrance of him.” He frequented the College library at Hanover and would bring home ponderous volumes, almost as large as he could carry. Old residents remember him riding to mill on horseback with his face hidden in the pages of an open book that he held before him. At the age of nineteen he entered Dartmouth College, graduating in 1818 with the valedictory and the highest honors of his class, which was of more than average ability, containing among others such scholars as Professor William Chamberlain of Dartmouth College, and the late Professor Thomas C. Upham of Bowdoin College. During a part of his college course, Mr. Bush was a private tutor in the family of Honorable Mills Olcott, and there probably was formed an intimate friendship between himself and Rufus Choate of the class of 1819. The two young men chummed together during the college course, and Mr. Choate ever after kept a high regard for and estimate of his college friend. After teaching one year in the Orange County Grammar School at Randolph, Vt., Mr. Bush commenced the study of theology at Princeton Seminary, where he...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Indiana Genealogy at Ancestry

Ancestry is the largest provider of genealogy data online. The billions of records they provide have advanced genealogy online beyond imagination just a decade ago. The following is but a small sample of what they provide for Indiana genealogy at Ancestry. While some of these databases are free, many require a subscription. You can try a 14 day free trial and see if you can find any of your Indiana genealogy at Ancestry! Indiana Genealogy Databases – Subscription May be Required Ancestry Free Trial Indiana Statewide Genealogy at Ancestry 1820 federal census for Indiana A brief history of Indiana A descriptive catalogue of the official publications of the territory and state of Indiana : from 1800 to 1890 : including refe A history of Indiana A list of all the Friends Meetings that exist or ever have existed in Indiana, 1807-1955 An illustrated history of the state of Indiana : being a full and authentic civil and political history of the state from its f Background of genealogical research in Kentucky and Indiana Biographical and historical cyclopedia of Indiana and Armstrong Counties, Pennsylvania Biographical and historical sketches of early Indiana Biographical sketches of members of the Indiana state government, state and judicial officials, and members of the 51st Legisla Biographical sketches of the pioneer preachers of Indiana Brief biographies of the members of the Indiana state government : executive, judicial and legislative, 1874-5. Caleb Mills and the Indiana school system Celebration of the one hundredth anniversary of Indiana’s admission into the Union Centennial history and handbook of Indiana : the story of the state from its beginning to the close of...

Treaty of August 30, 1819

A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a commissioner on the part of the United States of America, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to cede, and hereby relinquish, to the United States, all the lands which the said tribe has heretofore possessed, or which they may rightfully claim, on the Wabash river, or any of its waters. Article II. And to the end that the United States may be enabled to fix with the other Indian tribes a boundary between their respective claims, the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, do hereby declare, that their rightful claim is as follows, viz: beginning at the northwest corner of the Vincennes tract; thence, westward, by the boundary established by treaty with the Piankeshaws, on the thirtieth day of December, eighteen hundred and five, to the dividing ridge between the waters of the Embarras and the Little Wabash; thence, by the said ridge, to the source of the Vermilion river; thence, by the same ridge, to the head of Pine creek; thence, by the said creek, to the Wabash river; thence, by the said river, to the mouth of the Vermilion river, and thence by the Vermilion, and the boundary heretofore established, to the place of beginning. Article III. The said Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to relinquish, and they do hereby exonerate and discharge the United States from, the annuity of...

Treaty of November 28, 1840

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Forks of the Wabash, in the State of Indiana, this twenty-eighth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty, between Samuel Milroy and Allen Hamilton, acting (unofficially) as commissioners on the part of the United States, and the chiefs, warriors and headmen of the Miami tribe of Indians. Article I. The Miami tribe of Indians, do hereby cede to the United States all that tract of land on the south side of the Wabash river, not heretofore ceded, and commonly known as “the residue of the Big Reserve.” Being all of their remaining lands in Indiana. Article II. For and in consideration of the cession aforesaid, the United States agree to pay to the Miami tribe of Indians the sum of five hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Three hundred thousand dollars of which sum to be set apart, and applied immediately after the ratification of this treaty and an appropriation is made by Congress to carry its provisions into effect, to the payment of the debts of the tribe, as hereinafter stipulated. And the residue, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, to be paid in twenty equal yearly installments. Article III. The Miamies, being desirous that their just debts shall be fully paid; it is hereby, at their request stipulated, that immediately on the ratification of this treaty, the United States shall appoint a commissioner or commissioners, who shall be authorized to investigate all claims against any and every member of the tribe, which have accrued since the 6th day of November, 1838,...

Treaty of August 11, 1820

A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner for that purpose on the part of the United States, of the one part; and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Wea tribe of Indians, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, agree to cede, and they do hereby cede and relinquish, to the United States all the lands reserved by the second article of the Treaty between the United States and the said Tribe, concluded at Saint Mary’s, on the second day of October, eighteen hundred and eighteen. Article II. The sum of five thousand dollars, in money and goods, which is now paid and delivered by the United States, the receipt whereof the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, do hereby acknowledge, is considered by the parties a full compensation for the cession and relinquishment above mentioned. Article III. As it is contemplated by the said Tribe, to remove from the Wabash, it is agreed, that the annuity secured to the Weas, by the Treaty of Saint Mary’s, above mentioned, shall hereafter be paid to them at Kaskaskia, in the state of Illinois. Article IV. This Treaty, as soon as it is ratified by the President and Senate of the United States, to be binding on the contracting parties. In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, commissioner as aforesaid, and the said chiefs, warriors, and head men, of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at Vincennes, this eleventh day of August, eighteen hundred and twenty. B. Parke Maquakononga, or Negro Legs,...

Treaty of June 4, 1816

Articles of a treaty made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States. Article II.The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties which they have respectively made with the United States. Article III. The boundary line, surveyed and marked by the United States, of the land on the Wabash and White rivers, ceded in the year eighteen hundred and nine, the said tribes do hereby explicitly recognize and confirm, as having been executed conformably to the several treaties they have made with the United States. Article IV. The chiefs and warriors of the said tribe of the Kickapoos acknowledge that they have ceded to the United States all that tract of country which lies between the aforesaid boundary line on the north west side of the Wabash-the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from the north west corner of the said boundary line, so as to strike the Vermillion river twenty miles in a direct line from its mouth, according to the terms and conditions of the treaty they made with the United States on the ninth day of December, in the year eighteen hundred and nine....
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