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Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died; Charles Perkins, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below; Anna Reynolds, born Nov. 11, 1822, married Theodore Lilley, of North Bridgewater, and died Jan. 28, 1882; Rhoda Perkins, born Oct. 28, 1830, married Barnabas H. Gray, of Kingston, Mass.; Sanford, born Nov. 25, 1833, died in Boston, though he lived at Louisville, Ky., where he was engaged in the shoe business, and where he married Maggie J. Harvey. Charles Keith, the father, died July 29, 1859, and the mother passed away April 22, 1863. Naturally of a “bookish” turn of mind, outdoor occupations had little attraction for Mr. Keith, and in the gratification of his tastes and inclinations farming pursuits were neglected for the less severe physical occupation of the shop. In his younger days he was evidently quite an athlete, for it is related that at the “raising” of Sprague’s Mill, Factory Village, a wrestling match was planned for the occasion, and that he was pitted against several, all of whom he overcame, when, as a last resort, Lieut. Israel Packard was brought forward to contend for the honors; after a protracted struggle he, too, was...

Seabury Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

SEABURY – variously spelled Sebury, Saberry, Saberrey and Sabury. The American ancestor of the Seaburys of New Bedford was (I) John Seabury, of Boston, who died before 1662. He married Grace, and had two sons – John (who went to Barbados) and Samuel (born Dec. 10, 1640) – and several daughters. (II) Samuel Seabury, son of John, born Dec. 10, 1640, died Aug. 5, 1681. He married at Weymouth Nov. 9, 1660, Patience Kemp, who died Oct. 29, 1676. He married (second) April 4, 1677, Martha Pabodie, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Alden) Pabodie and granddaughter of John and Priscilla (Mullins) Alden of the “Mayflower.” His children were: Elizabeth, born Sept. 16, 1661, who probably removed from the town, as in her mother’s will she was given a negro girl Jane and a cow “if she returns”; Sarah, born Aug. 18, 1663; Samuel, born April 20, 1666; Hannah, born July 7, 1668; John, born Nov. 7, 1670; Grace and Patience, twins, born March 1, 1673 (all born to the first marriage); Joseph, born June 8, 1678; Martha, born Sept. 23, 1679; John, who married Elizabeth Alden on Dec. 9, 1697 (to the second marriage). Samuel Seabury, the father, was a physician and removed to Duxbury, Mass. His will gives to his son Samuel his landed property in Duxbury; to son Joseph “those great silver buttons which I usually wear”; to son John “my birding piece and musket. I will that my negro servant Nimrod (valued at twenty-seven pounds) be disposed of either by hier or sale in order to bring up my children, especially the three youngest now born.”...

Descendants of Davis Snow Packard of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

In the death of Davis Snow Packard, which occurred in Brockton, Mass., July 31, 1900, the city lost one of its foremost citizens as well as one of its most successful manufacturers. Mr. Packard was a native of the town of North Bridgewater, now the city of Brockton, born June 24, 1826, son of Apollos and Betsey (Packard) Packard, and a descendant of one of the oldest and most prominent families of the old Bay State. (I) Samuel Packard, the founder of the family in America, was a native of England, his home being at Windham, near Hingham. In 1638 he came to this country in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, accompanied by his wife Elizabeth and one child. He located first at Hingham, Mass., whence he removed to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the first settlers, and where he held various public offices. He was also a tavern-keeper in 1670. His death occurred in West Bridgewater, his will being probated March 3, 1684-85. He was the father of twelve children. (II) Zaccheus Packard, second son and third child of Samuel and Elizabeth Packard, made his home in West Bridgewater, where he followed farming. There he married Sarah Howard, daughter of John Howard, who came from England and settled first at Duxbury, Mass., later becoming one of the first settlers of West Bridgewater. Zaccheus Packard died Aug. 3, 1723. He was the father of nine children, his youngest six sons all becoming early settlers of the North Parish of Bridgewater, now the city of Brockton. (III) Capt. Abiel Packard, the youngest child of Zaccheus and Sarah (Howard)...

Bender Ancestors

The bulk of the Bender family in this country has come to be identified with that group of early Americans known as the “Pennsylvania Dutch”. The early English settlers coined this term and although they really meant to say “Deutsch”, meaning German, the word soon became corrupted into “Dutch”. They applied this name to those German, Swiss and even French Huguenots who had arrived here in the 1700’s and settled first in that small area roughly defined as south-central and eastern Pennsylvania.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Fisk Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Andrew and Abraham Fisk were brothers, but where and when they were born or whence they came to this town there is no date in possession of the writer, or when their houses were built, although they were standing in the earliest recollections of the writer. Andrew Fisk married March 12, 1827, Almira, daughter of Freeman and Thankful Hardin; she was born Nov. 15, 1802. Their children were: George, Andrew, Benjamin, Frederick, James, Rodney, Helen, Almira, Mary and John. Andrew married Sarah B. Milliken for a second wife, by whom he had: Abby, Abraham, and two additional unnamed children.

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