Florida


Timucua Religion

According to our French informants the sun and moon were the principal objects of adoration among these Indians, particularly the former.1 This probably means that their beliefs were substantially like those of the Creeks and Chickasaw. A side light on their cult is furnished in the following account of a ceremony by Le Moyne: The



Calusa Indians in Florida

An early Spanish writer. Gov. Mendez de Canço, writing in 1598 or 1599, says that the Indians of southern Florida did not live in settled villages because they had no corn, but wandered about in search of fish and roots. Fontaneda, whose information dates from a very early period, has the following to say about



Ais Tribe of Florida

Ais Public House

The ethnological information which this work contains applies almost entirely to the Indians of Hobe, Santa Lucia, and Ais – those called by Fontaneda Jeaga, Guacata, and Ais



Timicua Indians Food

The Florida Indians lived partly upon the natural products of the earth, but depended principally upon the chase, fishing, and agriculture, Laudonnière says: They make the string of their bow of the gut of the stag, or of a stag’s skin, which they know how to dress as well as any man in France, and



Timucua Indians Homes

There are not many special descriptions of Timucua houses. Ribault says, in speaking of the dwellings of those Indians whom he met at the mouth of the river which he called the Seine and which was probably what is now known as the St. Marys: Their houses are made of wood, fitly and closely set



Timucua Indians Clothing

Ribault describes the Timucua as “of good stature, well shaped of body as any people in the world; very gentle, courteous, and good-natured, of tawny color, hawked nose, and of pleasant countenance.”1 They were good swimmers and could climb trees with agility. The only invariable article of apparel worn by males was the breechclout, which



Florida World War 2 NMCG Casualty List

Inclusion of names in Florida World War II Casualty List has been determined solely by the residence of next of kin at the time of notification of the last wartime casualty status. This listing does not necessarily represent the State of birth, legal residence, or official State credit according to service enlistment. Casualties listed represent



Biography of Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks

Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks, fourth son of James Oliver Jelks and Mary Polhill, was born July 18, 1845, in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, where he died March 28, 1911. When six years old his family moved to Oglethorpe, Georgia, after two years moving to Hamilton County, Florida, where he received his early education, later studying in



Slave Narrative of Sam and Louisa Everett

Sam and Louisa Everett, 86 and 90 years of age respectively, have weathered together some of the worst experiences of slavery, and as they look back over the years, can relate these experiences as clearly as if they had happened only yesterday. Both were born near Norfolk, Virginia and sold as slaves several times on



Florida County Courthouse Addresses

Office of Vital Statistics, Dept of Health Dept of Health P.O. Box 210, 1217 Pearl Street Jacksonville, FL 32231 (904) 359-6900 Alachua County PO Box 2877 Gainesville, FL 32602-2877 (352) 374-5204 Lake County P.O. Box 7800 Tavares, FL 32778-7800 (352) 742-4102 Baker County 55 North Third Street MacClenny, FL 32063-2101 (904) 259-3613 Lee County P.O.



Newsletter Signup

We currently provide two newsletters. Why not take both for a run?

Genealogy Update: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new, or significantly updated, collection or database on our website.

Circle of Nations: We send out this newsletter whenever we feature a new (or significantly updated) Native American collection or database on our website.

Once you've clicked on the Subscribe button above you'll receive an email from us requesting confirmation. You must confirm the email before you will be able to receive any newsletter.