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Rosedale Cemetery, Phoenix, Arizona

This cemetery lies in the southwest part of Phoenix, near 20 Ave. and Washington street. It was platted 1898, deed acknowledged January 21, 1898, and recorded April 30, of the same year. There have been no burials there since 1911 or 1912, and the grounds are unfenced, untended and in general disrepair. Many of the board markers are so worn by the weather that the inscriptions can scarcely be deciphered, and large numbers have all marks worn off, while some are partly destroyed by fire. Many really fine marble and granite monuments are thrown off the bases, and while it is said to be the intention of the city to move the marked graves to a new location the time for doing so will surely find many of the marks of identification destroyed. I was told by members of the City Planning committee that it is the intention to smooth over the grounds of this place, after moving the marked graves, and convert it into a park. Many of the graves are those of the so called “health seekers” who died far away from home and friends, and whose graves are marked with a board on which is painted the name, and sometimes age, of the person buried there. ANDREWS, ANNIE L., wife of E. L. Andrews, b. Oct. 3, 1843, d. Oct. 25, 1900. ANDREWS, JOHN C., born June 14, 1854, died Nov. 11, 1907. ANDREWS, MRS. SUSIE, wife of J. C. Andrews, d. Apr. 26, 1900, ae. 43 yrs. BENTON, MRS. MARY E., b. 1843, d. Sept. 18, 1899 (board marker). BLUMIDGE, R., Co. F, 4th Calif....

Elbow Creek Cemetery Records, Tulare County, California

(near Visalia) ARCHER O. J., 1844 – 1913, ae. 69 yrs. Frank, 1882 – 1907, ae. 25 yrs. J. W., b. 29 Oct. 1839, d. 24 June 1916, ae. 77 yrs. BENNETT Katherine, 1865 – 1939. Ralph, 1891 – 1897 or 1899. Rufus, 1907 – 1907. Silas, 1868 – 1926. BLAYLOCK Ethyle. Ray Luther. Steven. CALCOTE Infant, 1894 – 1894. Allen K., b. 11 Feb. 1830, d. 7 Dec. 1911. Husband of Deliah Calcote. Delilah, b. 28 June 1840, d. 21 Apr. 1903. Etta Merle, 1895 – 1895. George, d. 14 Sept. 1872, ae. 2 yrs., 9 mos., 3 days. Son of A. K. and Delilah Calcote. James J., b. 26 Feb. 1861, d. 1 Oct. 1887. Son of A. K. and Delilah Calcote. Lucy E., d. 1864. Dau. of A. K. and Delilah Calcote. CHRISTMAN Effie Ovella, b. 3 Aug. 1878, d. 22 June 1892. Dau. of Gabrill and Polly Christman. CHRISMAN Elizabeth M., b. 26 Nov. 1843, d. 7 Sept. 1882. H. T., b. 14 Jan. 1830, d. 16 Mar. 1893, ae. 63 yrs. Willie F., d. 12 Dec. 1863, ae. 2 yrs., 6 mos. Son of H. T. and E. Chrisman. CHRISTMAN Gabriel, b. 9 Feb. 1833, d. 13 Apr. 1905. Born in Virginia. Polly W., b. 19 Nov. 1849, d. 21 Oct. 1930. Born in Missouri. Sarah E., b. 27 Oct. 1881, d. 27 July 1882. Dau. of G. and P. W. Christman. ELLWOOD Clifford, 1882 – 1883. Mary, 1862 – 1898. HARRELL Casterana, d. 12 Nov. 1868, ae. 50 yrs. Wife of Henry Harrell. John, d. 2 Nov. 1878, ae. 19 yrs., 6 mos.,...

Memory Gardens Cemetery Records, Don Luis, Cochise County, Arizona

BUTTRAM Bessie, b. 1887. Wife of Charles B. Buttram. Charles B., b. 1890, d. 1958. Husband of Bessie Buttram. HALL Anna Mae, b. 1891. Wife of George R. George R., b. 1885, d. 1958. DEALBINE (N.X.N.) KENDALL Roy LaVern, d. 15 Aug. 1958, ae. 80 yrs., 3 days. KLING (N.X.N.) MADDEN Raymond R., b. 13 Dec. 1909, d. 30 May 1958, ae. 48 yrs., 5 mos., 17 days. MALDONADO Jose Garcia, b. 5 Aug. 1937, Superior, Arizona, d. 1 Jan. 1959. MARSHALL Eliza Jane, b. 10 Nov. 1873, d. 25 Nov. 1958. RICHARDS Lucille, b. 1906. Wife of Mike Richards. Mike, b. 1903, d. 1958. Husband of Lucille Richards. SEEMAN Lewis H., b. 1899, d. 1959. WALTERS Roy, b. 16 Aug. 1896, d. 17 Dec. 1958. Born in...

Ramsy Canyon Cemetery Records, Cochise County, Arizona

(Loc. on Roy A. Newman land) BEAR Madison, b. 14 Oct. 1845, d. 26 Dec. 1882. DEWITT Clinton, b. 185-, d. 1930. DEXTER John, (Caripetil), d. Mar., ae. 72 yrs. HAMMER James H. F., d. Feb. 1949, ae. 64 yrs., 2 mos., 16 days. WASH Eliza Jane, b. 1817, d. 1899. George, b. 1818, d. 1890. Marian, b. 1848, d. 1890. Rose, b. 1884, d. 1888. (Loc. on Russell Henil land) DEEDS Mrs., wife of Floyd...

Fry Cemetery Records, Fry, Cochise County, Arizona

FRY Arden Henry, b. 30 Oct. 1906, d. 7 Nov. 1927. Elizabeth Ruth Cathcart, b. 3 Apr. 1870, d. 25 Dec. 1919. Raymond Paul, b. Jan. 1936, d. Apr. 1937. MUNQUIA Julio, d. 31 July 1957, ae. 72 yrs., 2 mos., 29 days. STANLEY Anthoney Oliver, b. 13 Feb. 1918, d. 23 Feb. 1928. Cora Belle Fry, b. 16 Aug. 1895, d. 18 June 1930. Zella Cecelia, b. 28 Dec. 1919, d. 16 Jan....

The Moqui Tribe in History 1780-1820

Efforts Of Governor Anza To Convert The Moquis 1780 Father Garces reported to Governor Anza his failure at the Moqui pueblos just cited and the governor at once took steps to convert them. H. H. Bancroft (volume xvii pages 265-260) gives the following details translated from the original documents of the efforts of Governor. Anza to convert the Moquis: Back from this campaign [in 1778] Governor Anna gave his attention to the Moquis A failure of crops had reduced that people to such straits that the time was deemed most favorable for their conversion even Christianity being perhaps preferable to starvation. Many of them were said to have abandoned their towns to seek food in the mountains and among the Navajos and these fugitives were reported as disposed to submit, though the others still preferred death. It was feared that if something were not done now all the Moquis might quit pueblo life and join the hostile gentiles. Anza wrote repeatedly to Croix on the prospects, inclosing letters from the padres and advising that an effort should be made either to establish missionaries at the towns which would require some additional force or to induce the natives to migrate en masse and settle in new pueblos nearer Spanish centers. In reply the commandant general did not favor the use of force, but advised that Anna on some pretext as of an Apache campaign should visit the Moquis, give them some food and persuade them if possible to settle in New Mexico; otherwise the foundation might be laid for future conversion. The governor continued his efforts and in August 1780...

The Moqui Tribe In History 1834-1850

In Victor’s River of the West page 163 it is noted that in 1834 a trapping party of 200 men of the Rocky Mountain Fur Company went from Bill Williams fork to the Moqui towns whore several trappers plundered the gardens and shot 15 or 20 peaceful Moquis. In Spanish Mexican and American annals the Moquis are found complaining of the Navajos who were almost constantly robbing them and who would drive them away from the water now, so as to use it for their herds, but for fear of the law and soldiers. Prior to 1866 the United States authorities were ignorant both of the condition of the Moquis and the names of their pueblos The Moquis 1846-1850 The Hopi Pueblos in 1846 came under the control of the United States authorities by the capture of New Mexico in 1846. They were so merged in history and tradition with the New Mexican Pueblos up to 1866 that they are only heard of as Moquis at long intervals. Governor Charles Bent appointed by General S. W. Kearny, August 1846 in a report to William Medill Commissioner of Indian Affairs dated November 10, 1846 wrote of the Moquis: The Moquis (Moquis) are neighbors of the Navajos and live in permanent villages cultivate grain and fruits and raise all the varieties of stock. They were formerly a very numerous people the possessors of large flocks and herds, but have bean reduced in numbers and possessions by their more warlike neighbors and enemies the Navajos. The Moques (Moquis) are an intelligent and industrious people. The Mormons pushed their settlements down toward them...

The Moqui Tribe In History 1851-1852

In 1851-1852 P. S. G. Ten Broeck assistant surgeon United States army stationed in New Mexico made several journeys among the Moqui Pueblos and Navajos. In March 1852 he visited the Moquis of which visit he writes as follows: Walpi March 31 1852. Between 11 and 19 o’clock today we arrived at the first towns of Maqui [Moqui]. All the inhabitants turned out crowding the streets and house tops to have a view of the white men. All the old men pressed forward to shake hands with us and we were most hospitably received and conducted to the governor’s house, where we were at once feasted upon guavas and a leg of mutton broiled upon the coals. After the feast we smoked with them and they then said that we should move our camp in, and that they would give us room and plenty of wood for the men and sell us corn for the animals. Accordingly a Maqui [Moqui] Indian was dispatched with a note to the sergeant ordering him to break up camp and move up town. The Indian left on foot at 12:30 p m., and although it took an hour to catch the mules and pack up, the men arrived and were in their quarters by 6 p. in. The camp was about 8.5 miles from the village. He could not have been more than an hour in going there, but they were accustomed to running from their infancy and have great bottom. This evening we bought sufficient corn for the mules at $5 per faneja (2.5 bushels), paying in bayjeta or red cloth, and...
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