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Tribute to Bishop Whipple by the Rev. J. J. Enmegahbowh

Gen. James Grant Wilson. Two men in this broad land of ours have won the noble title of the apostle to the Indians. It was first worn by Rev. John Elliott in the seventeenth century. The other was well known to this conference and well loved, Henry B. Whipple. This morning I received from Mrs. Whipple a letter, in which she gave me some touching details of her noble husband’s last hours and of his funeral, which more than 200 Chippewa Indians came to attend four days after his death, some coming more than a hundred miles to look once more on the beautiful face of their ever faithful friend, to whom they gave the appropriate title of “Straight Tongue.” That was the name by which Henry B. Whipple was known throughout all the Indian tribes of his diocese in Minnesota. Mrs. Whipple says the most heartrending and pathetic letters continue to come to her from Indians all over the country. May I read this one from the Chippewa Indians? A Tribute From Indians To Bishop Whipple. A tribute to Bishop Whipple by the Rev. J. J. Enmegahbowh (full-blooded Chippewa), ordained to the priesthood by Bishop Whipple in the early part of his episcopate: “I write the language of my sorrowful heart. I can not say much at this time my heart is too heavy. When I heard that our bishop had died, I said, ‘No, this can not be;’ I did not think our bishop could die. But in another hour a second messenger entered my house to assure me that the loved bishop had died truly. I...

Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian

Third session, Thursday morning, October 17 Rev. Frank Wright, a Choctaw Indian, was introduced as the next speaker. Rev. Frank Wright. With the Choctaws the land question is, When shall we get hold of our land? All we want is the land. We were the first of the five tribes to agree to take it in severalty, and we are the last to get our allotments. I do not know why. So far as making farmers of the Indians, in dealing with a man you have got to take him as you find him. You cannot make blacksmiths of all the Indians, and you can not make farmers of them all. Some will turn to the ministry, some to medicine, and some to law. You can make no hard and fast rule about it. But the first principle to teach him is that he must labor to take care of himself. The Indian must become self-dependent. We have been giving them rations till they are pauperized. It is a scandal and a shame, and I shall be glad when rations are absolutely cut off and the Indians must work or starve. I have worked among the Apaches, who were held as prisoners, and have established missions among them, and I want to tell you what I have found there. These prisoners were compelled to work, and it had a wonderful influence on them. It gave them an incentive; it took away their aimless life; it took them away from gambling; it showed them how to do things. I am in favor of compelling Indians to work. These Apaches worked eight...

Address by Dr. Theodore L. Cuyler

Dr. Theodore L. Cuyler. Good friends, I have been asked to add a few words of parting before we turn our faces homeward, and they must be words of hearty congratulation on the splendid success of this conference. My deafness has prevented me from drinking in your streams of eloquence, but my very much better half has quick ears to hear, and she has told me that your speeches have been a perpetual feast, and that all the proceedings have been on the highest plane of effectiveness and usefulness. If I have not ears to hear, I have eyes to see the noble company of men and honorable women, not a few, who have been gathered during these few days. Let me tell you what a source of sorrow it has been to have come here and missed two of the most conspicuous figures that have been in times past the joy and glory of your conference. I had hoped to look into the honest face and grasp the honest hand of Massachusetts grand old Christian statesman, Henry L. Dawes. Thank God the grand old man is with us in spirit. Let us hope that we may hear him in meetings yet to come. And that other most conspicuous figure the handsome and the holy-hearted bishop of Minnesota never will enter this hall again. He has been translated into the innumerable company of the white robed and the crowned conquerors in glory. Permit me, ere we close, to offer a word or two of personal tribute to my beloved old friend. Bishop Whipple and myself were almost exactly the...

President James M. Taylor, Vassar College

President James M. Taylor, of Vassar College, was invited to speak. President Taylor. There is only one subject on which I can say a word tonight. I was struck by a remark made last night by Mr. Sherman in his interesting address regarding the difficulty in the way of proper reform in many directions, which we are pursuing in the Indian work on account of the treaties that have been made by us, or were made by our fathers with the various Indian tribes. Reference has been made to that subject by one of the speakers this afternoon. I am very sorry to controvert in any way an Impression that a treaty should in all circumstances be maintained, but I raise this question, as a simple, practical question in ethics, Is it always desirable to keep a treaty? I shall not yield to any man or woman here in my reverence for truth, in my abhorrence for untruth, whether on the part of a man or a nation. But it becomes often something more than a simple abstract question of truth and falsehood when we face an issue of this kind. Statesmanship is not, as it was cynically suggested, the property of dead politicians. Statesmanship consists in adjusting ourselves on principles of truth and honor to present conditions. A states-man is a man who dares to put before a nation a course of conduct in harmony with truth and righteousness which may be unpopular today, which may not commend itself to the majority of the people, but which he knows to be for the ultimate good of the nation,...

Mrs. A. S. Quinton and the Women’s National Indian Association

Mrs. A. S. Quinton was invited to speak for the women of the country and their work for Indians. Mrs. A. S. Quinton, president of the Women’s National Indian Association. I can not speak for the women of the whole country, of course, but I have a message to this conference from the women of the Women’s National Indian Association, and I believe I speak for the women of the missionary societies of the churches. We all believe in what has been said in regard to land. We long for the destruction of the reservation system. We should be grateful to see the unnecessary reservation abolished at once, and it would be according to the thought of all the workers if Indian agents could be instructed to keep in view as the end of the Indian Service the winding up of all that is peculiarly Indian and the placing Indians fully as citizens. Most of the Indians, we believe, are ready for the change. Those not ready the women would desire to have protected carefully and prepared for citizenship as rapidly as possible. In regard to the New York Indians, we women believe that they are ready for citizenship and that their reservations ought to be divided in severalty. Among the Seneca’s not a few have libraries, musical instruments, and are already truly civilized. In the realm of law we should be very glad if genuine citizenship” could be given to all, thus letting the Indians realize that they are free citizens in fact. Citizenship should and could be made real by giving them all the privileges and protections...

Rev. Egerton R. Young Speaks

Rev. Egerton R. Young was asked to speak five minutes Rev. E. R. Young, Toronto, Canada. We had a glorious camp meeting this summer among the Indians. I invited you to come, and I invite you again. There were about thirty white people there with us. When we heard of the news about your beloved President I was with the Indians, and more than a thousand of them fell on their knees while we prayed for his restoration. We were all filled with sorrow over the terrible news. We people of Canada have felt his death as a personal loss. Our cities were draped in black, our flags were at half-mast, and at the time of the funeral services were held in all of our chief churches. We rejoice and thank God for this mighty Republic, whose heart during these later years has learned to beat more and more in sympathy with the motherland. Both lands are doing the great work of giving the gospel and liberty and freedom to the different races which come under them in this great world of ours. I should like to have referred to the English method of dealing with the Indians, and tell you how it is that we have never had a war with any Indian tribe or spent a dollar in feeding Indians, and politics is forever banished from the selection of Indian agents, but there is no time. Let me give you one incident in connection with our camp meeting this summer in closing. Two or three drunken Indians came to the camp ground one day, and some of...

Mr. John Lolorias, a Papagos Indian Speaks

Fourth session, Thursday night, October 17. Mr. John Lolorias, an Indian student from Hampton, was invited to speak Mr. Lolorias. My being called on to speak before these great men and public speakers reminds me of a story. An old Indian was once invited to a prayer meeting, and the white men made him understand that they wanted him to pray. So the old Indian got up and said, “O, Lord, January, February; January, February,” and he kept on repeating those two names of the months till finally someone motioned to him to sit down. Then a white man said, “We have seen how honestly and earnestly our Indian friend has tried to take part in this meeting, and even if those two words which he spoke do not make us understand what is in his mind, we do understand that he no longer means to shoot anyone with his bows and arrows or to scalp anyone; that he is our friend.” So while I shall try to tell you in a few and simple words a little about my own people, I hope, in spite of the imperfection of my speech, you will catch some idea of what I shall try to tell you. My people, the Papago, live in Arizona. Nothing was known about them till a few years ago, when they got into trouble with the Mexicans. They lived on their own land. I call it my home because I was raised there; but any white man has as much right to call that place his home as I have, because that land is open to...

Schools for the Indians

Schools For The Indians. Location, capacity, attendance, etc., of non-reservation schools during fiscal year ended June 30, 1901. Location of school Date of Opening Number of Employeesa Capacity Enrollment Average attendance Carlisle Pa Nov 1, 1879 85 b 950 1,040 970 Chemawa, Oreg. (Salem) Feb. 25, 1880 43 500 569 502 Chilocco, Okla Jan 15,1884 44 400 508 399 Genoa, Nebr. Feb 20, 1884 30 300 283 248 Albuquerque. N. Mex. Aug. 1884 34 300 336 315 Lawrence, Kan, (Haskell Institute) Sept 1, 1884 57 700 746 633 Grand Junction, Colo. 1886 21 170 229 177 Santa Fe, N. Mex. Oct 29, 1890 29 300 346 316 Fort Mohave, Ariz. Dec. 21, 1890 21 170 170 164 Carson, Nev. Dec. 22, 1890 22 200 250 192 Pierre, S. D. Feb. 13, 1891 13 150 150 114 Phoenix Ariz. Sept. 1891 55 700 743 684 Fort Lewis, Colo. Mar. 1892 38 300 347 301 Fort Shaw Mont Dec 27, 1892 30 300 340 302 Perris Col Jan 9, 1893 18 150 223 204  Flandreau, S. Dak. Mar. 7, 1893 34 350 383 339 Pipestone Minn. Feb. 1893 16 150 109 101 Mount Pleasant, Mich. Jan. 3, 1893 23 300 291 200 Tomah, Wis. Jan. 19, 1893 22 225 215 190 Wittenberg, Wis.c Aug 24, 1895 12 100 114 103 Greenville, Cal.c Sept. 25, 1895 8 100 78 58 Morris Minn.c Apr 3 1897 18 150 176 152 Chamberlain, S. Dak Mar. , 1898 13 100 118 109 Fort Bidwell, Cal Apr. 4, 1898 7 150 59 44 Rapid City, S. Dak Sept. 1, 1898 11 100 105 100            Total...

Thirty-Third Annual Report

Thirty-Third Annual Report of the Board of Indian Commissioners includes the history of the Ogden Land Company, the claims of the company to certain of the lands of the Seneca Indian Nation, in the State of New York, and other matters of material interest connected with these Indians.

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