Winnebago Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Winnebago are a branch of the great Dakota family, calling themselves O-tchun-gu-rah, and by the Sioux, Hotanke, or the Big-voiced People; by the Chippeway, Winnebagonk whence their common English name a word meaning men from the fetid waters. The French knew them as La Puans (the Stinkers), supposed to have been given them in



Wyandot Indian Tribe, Photo Descriptions

The Wyandot, or Huron, a western Iroquois tribe, lived originally on the shores of Lake Huron, where they raised tobacco to such an extent that they were called Petem, or Tobacco Indians. Were driven west to Wisconsin and to the shores of Lake Superior, and by the Sioux back again to the neighbor hood of



Utah Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Utah, Yuta, or Ute, as the name is variously written, are a large tribe belonging to the great Shoshone family* and who occupy the mountainous portion of Colorado, with portions of Utah, New Mexico, and Nevada. Those living in the mountains where game abounds have a fine physical development, are brave and hardy, and



Waco and Wichita Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

Waco 742. Long Soldier. (Front.) 743. Long Soldier. (Profile.) Wichita 744. Assadawa. (Front.) 745. Assadawa. (Profile.) 746. Esquitzchew. (Front.) 747. Esquitzchew. (Profile.) 748. Black Horse. 165, 167. Buffalo Goad. (Front.) 166, 168. Buffalo Goad. (Profile.) Was one of the great delegation of chiefs from the Indian Territory in 1872, among whom were Little Raven, Little



Warm Springs Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Warm Springs Indians, so named from their location about the thermal springs in Northern Oregon, are related to the Walla Walla, and number 187, on a reservation of some 725 square miles, on which are also some 300 Wasco and Tenino. The combined tribes cultivate about 800 acres of the land. They are very



Wasco Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Wasco, like the Warm Springs Indians, are related to the Walla Walla, and through them to the Sahaptin family. The name signifies “basin,” and the tribe derives its name, traditionally, from the fact that formerly one of their chiefs, his wife having died, spent much of his time in making cavities or basins in



Seminole Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

“The Isti-Semole (wild men) who inhabit the peninsula of Florida (1836) are pure Muskogee, who have gradually detached themselves from the confederacy, but were still considered members of it till the United States treated with them as with an independent nation. The name of Seminoles was given to them on account of their being principally



Shoshone Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Shoshone, or Snake, are a tribe inhabiting the country about the head-waters of the Green and Snake Rivers, and a part of a great family of the same name, including the Comanche, Utah, and Kiowa. They occupy nearly all of the great Salt Lake Basin, to the eastern base of the Sierra Nevada, and



Temiculsa and Tawacanie Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

A small tribe in the Indian Territory associated with the Caddo, Kiowa, and others on the Wichita agency. They are well advanced toward civilization. List of illustrations 738-739. Dave. 740-741. Caw-Lac-Its-Ca. Son of Dave. Temiculsa A small band of Indians living in the southern portion of California, who are extensively intermarried with the Mexicans. They



Seneca Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

One of the Five Iroquois Nations in Western New York, comprising, originally, the Sinnekaas, as the Batch called them, (hence the word Seneca,) Onondaga, Mohawk, Cayuga, and Oneida. When first known to the French, were living on the south side of Lake Ontario, and engaged in a fierce war with their Algonkin neighbors. By conquest



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