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Wyandot Indian Tribe, Photo Descriptions

The Wyandot, or Huron, a western Iroquois tribe, lived originally on the shores of Lake Huron, where they raised tobacco to such an extent that they were called Petem, or Tobacco Indians. Were driven west to Wisconsin and to the shores of Lake Superior, and by the...

Winnebago Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Winnebago are a branch of the great Dakota family, calling themselves O-tchun-gu-rah, and by the Sioux, Hotanke, or the Big-voiced People; by the Chippeway, Winnebagonk whence their common English name a word meaning men from the fetid waters. The French knew them...

Seminole Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

“The Isti-Semole (wild men) who inhabit the peninsula of Florida (1836) are pure Muskogee, who have gradually detached themselves from the confederacy, but were still considered members of it till the United States treated with them as with an independent...

Utah Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Utah, Yuta, or Ute, as the name is variously written, are a large tribe belonging to the great Shoshone family* and who occupy the mountainous portion of Colorado, with portions of Utah, New Mexico, and Nevada. Those living in the mountains where game abounds have...

Wasco Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Wasco, like the Warm Springs Indians, are related to the Walla Walla, and through them to the Sahaptin family. The name signifies “basin,” and the tribe derives its name, traditionally, from the fact that formerly one of their chiefs, his wife having...

Shoshone Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

The Shoshone, or Snake, are a tribe inhabiting the country about the head-waters of the Green and Snake Rivers, and a part of a great family of the same name, including the Comanche, Utah, and Kiowa. They occupy nearly all of the great Salt Lake Basin, to the eastern...

Seneca Indian Tribe Photo Descriptions

One of the Five Iroquois Nations in Western New York, comprising, originally, the Sinnekaas, as the Batch called them, (hence the word Seneca,) Onondaga, Mohawk, Cayuga, and Oneida. When first known to the French, were living on the south side of Lake Ontario, and...
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