Category: Vital Records

Iowa Death Records by County

Many experts recommend starting your research with the death records first. The death record is the most recent record, so it will more likely be available to you. Death records are kept in the state where your ancestor died,...

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New Jersey Marriage Index 1901-2016

Alec Ferretti, a budding genealogist, took upon himself the task of filing an OPRA request with the New Jersey Department of Health, seeking the marriage indices that legally should have been made available to the public (based on the law) but had not been. After being denied his request, he sought the help of genealogist’s newest friends, Reclaim the Records. They with their legal team helped Alec successfully challenge the denial, and to make this story short, though it wasn’t, they were able to get the indices available opened to the public and published on Archive.org. The setup at archive, not being conducive to a quick search, I have provided the links straight to the data, along with explanation text as provided by Reclaim the Records.

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Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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Lowell Massachusetts Annual Reports 1862-1928

Most towns in New England started publishing annual reports of the town’s public business in the 1800’s and many smaller towns still carry on that trait today. The following list of 52 free annual reports for Lowell Massachusetts covers the years of 1862-1928 (incomplete). Each town provided different reports in it’s annual publications, but they generally contain information on vital records (births, marriages and deaths) for the year of publication (not always included in early years), lists of public officials, lists of police officers, firemen, and other government workers, including school teachers. Don’t overlook the town’s expenditures list, as it often included payments made to town citizens for work they performed in the town’s behest. Also, many towns include payments made for the support of the indigent within the town.

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Dedham Massachusetts Historical Society Register 1890-1903

From 1890-1903, the Dedham Historical Society in Dedham Massachusetts printed a quarterly pamphlet for it’s historical society called the “Dedham Historical Register.” In this pamphlet a variety of genealogical data was published on families of Dedham and the villages emanating from the early residents of Dedham, such as Dorchester, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Needham, and Sharon, etc.

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Free Massachusetts Town Vital Records

This is a collection of 191 free town vital records books, otherwise known as “Tan Books” for Massachusetts towns. Generally these records go up to 1849/1850 at which, the genealogist can use the census records to assist in identifying the family connections further. Included with this article is an account of why and how these manuscripts were published.

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A Record of the Agee Family

James W. Agee wrote this pamphlet as a way to publish the vital records of every known Agee. Unfortunately, at the time of publication, he estimates to have received only a quarter of responses to the cards he sent out. Since he only asked for vital records, that’s all he presents in this manuscript. He claims all living Agee’s, except one, could claim descent from “the 24” who were the 24 children of James and Anthony Agee: Noah, James, Jacob, John, Hercules, Joseph, Rhoda, Ruth, Celia, Mary, Chloe, and Nancy, all children of James Agee; and Joshua, James, Daniel, Matthew, Jacob, John, Isaac, Joseph, Reuben, Anthony, Noah, and an unnamed daughter who married a ? Christian, all children of Andrew Agee.

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