Topic: Zuni

1890 Report on the Pueblos of Laguna, Acoma and Zuñi

By Julian Scott, Special Agent The following report was prepared during September and October 1890, and August and September 1891: Laguna Pueblo Acoma Pueblo Zuñi Pueblo My observation in the 3 pueblos of Laguna, Acoma, and Zuñi is, that the so called control of these people by the United States government makes them expectant, and they hurry to Santa Fe to the United States Indian agent on small matters, Their civilization from an Anglo Saxon standpoint is nominal, still they are more provident than their New Mexican neighbors. These people should at once be dropped by the nation and required to assume the duties of citizenship, to which they are legally entitled. The Indians of Laguna, Acoma, and Zuñi have many intensely interesting traditions. Their religions beliefs are founded upon a theology of their own, which while it is unlike the Christian in most respects it greatly resembles it on the moral side; their superstitions are endless. The Indians of Acoma and Laguna speak the same language as those of the pueblos of Zia, San Domingo, Cochiti, Santa Ana, San Felipe, Taos, and Islets, in New Mexico, and Tema, on the first Mesa, in Arizona. They live by agriculture, and stock raising; besides, they manufacture a large amount of pottery, which they sell to tourists and in the large towns accessible to them and along the Atlantic and Pacific...

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Zuñi Pueblo

Zuñi lies in a great plain, or valley, through which the Zuñi River flows. On account of the severe storm that had prevailed for a number of days the streets of the town were in a horrible condition, and looked as if they were never cleaned. They are now higher than the ground floors of the houses, though they were evidently once on the same level. Some of the terraced buildings are 5 stories high, reached by clumsy ladders and narrow partition steps of adobe or stone. All those visited were very clean inside, but as a general rule...

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Pueblo Family

Pueblo Indians, Pueblo Family – (towns, villages , so called on account of the peculiar style of compact permanent settlements of these people, as distinguished from temporary camps or scattered rancherias of less sub stantial houses). A term applied by the Spaniards and adopted by English-speaking people to designate all the Indians who lived or are living in permanent stone or adobe houses built into compact villages in south Colorado and central Utah, and in New Mexico, Arizona, and the adjacent Mexican territory, and extended sometimes to include the settlements of such tribes as the Pima and the Papago, who led an agricultural life. The Pueblo people of history comprise the Tanoan, Keresan (Queres), and Zunian linguistic families of New Mexico, and the Hopi, of Shoshonean affinity, in north east Arizona. These are distributed as follows, the tribes or villages noted being only those now existent or that recently have become extinct: Linguistic Stock Group Tribes or Villages Tanoan Tewa Tigua Jemez Tano Piro Nambe, Tesuque, San Ildefonso, Jan Juan, Santa Clara, Pojoaque (recently extinct) Hano Isleta, Sandia, Taos, Picuris, Isleta del Sur (Mexicanized) Jemez, Pecos (extinct) Practically extinct. Senecu, Socorro del Sur, (both Mexicanized) Keresan (Queres) Eastern Western San Felipe, Santa Ana, Sia, Cochiti, San Domingo Acoma, Laguna, and outlying villages Zuñian Zuñi Zuñi and its outlying villages Shoshonean Hopi Walpi, sichomovi, Mishongnovi, Sipaulovi, Shongopovi, Oraibi Pueblo Indians...

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Zuñi Indians

Zuñi Indians. Located on the north bank of upper Zuni River, Valencia County, New Mexico. The Zuni constitute the Zunian linguistic stock. According to Cushing (1896), the Zuni are descended from two peoples, one of whom came originally from the north and was later joined by the second, from the west or southwest (from the country of the lower Colorado), who resembled the Yuman and Piman peoples in culture.

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Zuñi Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Apoya. The extinct Sky clan of the Zuni. Ataakwe (seed people) A people encountered by the Zuñi before reaching their final residing place at Zuñi, N. Mex. They joined the Seed clan of the Zuñi, whose descendants constitute the present Taakwe, or Corn clan, of that tribe. Cashing in The Millstone, ix, 2, 23, 1884. Chitola. The nearly extinct Rattle snake clan of the Zuñi. Etaa. The Turtle clan of the Zuni of New Mexico. It appears to be extinct. Itiwa Ateuna (those of the midmost all). A Zuñi phratry embracing the Pichi or Mula (Parrot or Macaw), Taa (Seed or Corn), and Yatokya (Sun) clans. Gushing, inf’n, 1891. Iyama Ateuna (those of the upper most). A phratry embracing the Kyakyali (Eagle) and Ana (Tobacco) clans of the Zuñi. Gushing, inf’n,...

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Indian Etiquette

The interior of most native dwellings was without complete partitions, yet each member of the family had a distinct space, which was as inviolable as a separate apartment enclosed by walls. In this space the personal articles of the occupant were stored in packs and baskets, and here his bed was spread at night. Children played together in their own spaces and ran in and out of that belonging to the mother, but they were forbidden to intrude elsewhere and were never allowed to meddle with anyone’s possessions. When more than one family occupied a dwelling, as the earth lodge, the long bark house, or the large wooden structure of the N. W., every family had its well-known limits, within which each member had a place. A space was generally set apart for guests, to which, on entering, a visitor made his way. Among the Plains tribes this place was at the back part of the dwelling, facing the entrance, and the visitor when entering a lodge and going to this place must not pass between his host and the fire. Among many tribes the place of honor was at the w., facing the entrance. If he was a familiar friend, greetings were at once exchanged, but if he had come on a formal mission, he entered in silence, which was unbroken for some little time after he was...

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