Topic: Women

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Sarah Byrd

Person Interviewed: Sarah Byrd Location: Georgia Age: 95 An Interview On Slavery Obtained From Mrs. Sarah Byrd—ex-Slave Mrs. Sarah Byrd claims to be 95 years of age but the first impression one receives when looking at her is that of an old lady who is very active and possessing a sweet clear voice. When she speaks you can easily understand every word and besides this, each thought is well expressed. Often during the interview she would suddenly break out in a merry laugh as if her own thoughts amused her. Mrs. Sarah Byrd was born in Orange County Virginia the youngest of three children. During the early part of her childhood her family lived in Virginia her mother Judy Newman and father Sam Goodan each belonging to a different master. Later on the family became separated the father was sold to a family in East Tennessee and the mother and children were bought by Doctor Byrd in Augusta, Georgia. Here Mrs. Byrd remarked “Chile in them days so many families were broke up and some went one way and der others went t’other way; and you nebber seed them no more. Virginia wuz a reg’lar slave market.” Dr. Byrd owned a large plantation and raised such products as peas potatoes, cotton corn (etc). There were a large number of slaves. Mrs. Byrd was unable to give the exact number...

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Emmaline Heard

Person Interviewed: Emmaline Heard Location: 239 Cain Street On December 3 and 4, 1936, Mrs. Emmaline Heard was interviewed at her home, 239 Cain Street. The writer had visited Mrs. Heard previously, and it was at her own request that another visit was made. This visit was supposed to be one to obtain information and stories on the practice of conjure. On two previous occasions Mrs. Heard’s stories had proved very interesting, and I knew as I sat there waiting for her to begin that she had something very good to tell me. She began: “Chile, this story wuz told ter me by my father and I know he sho wouldn’t lie. Every word of it is the trufe; fact, everything I ebber told you wuz the trufe. Now, my pa had a brother, old Uncle Martin, and his wife wuz name Julianne. Aunt Julianne used ter have spells and fight and kick all the time. They had doctor after doctor but none did her any good. Somebody told Uncle Martin to go ter a old conjurer and let the doctors go cause they wan’t doing nothing fer her anyway. Sho nuff he got one ter come see her and give her some medicine. This old man said she had bugs in her head, and after giving her the medicine he started rubbing her head. While he rubbed her...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. John H. Stahl

MRS. JOHN H. STAHL. – This lady is a native of Niederklein, Prussia, and came to San Francisco in 1858. In 1860 she was married to John Stahl, and in 1862 came to Cañon City, Oregon. There Mr. Stahl engaged in the brewery business in 1863; but, upon the burning of the city and the loss of their property, they removed to Walla Walla, Washington Territory. Indeed, Cañon City saw rough times in those days, having once burned and twice washed away, and often invade by the Indians. still pursuing the same business in Walla Walla, they again met with a loss by fire in the destruction of their dwelling-house in 1871. During his residence there, Mr. Stahl served as city councilman, and in 1880 enlarged his business by building a new brewery, and purchasing six acres of ground for the site of his business and residence. He also owned a block for which he paid eight thousand dollars, and erected upon it a building at the expense of six thousand dollars. In 1883 Mr. Stahl died after a long illness. Mrs. Stahl found that his business was under heavy incumberances, but, developing large capacity of her own, immediately began an active supervision of the work. She soon extricated them from debt, and within three years was receiving a handsome income. In addition to her city property, she owns...

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Biography of Mrs. Helen Smith

MRS. HELEN SMITH. – There survives within the limits of the old Oregon no person whose life possesses more universal interest than the lady whose name appears above, and of whom we present an excellent portrait. The widow of a pioneer whose first operations upon this coast belong to the antique days of Wyeth and Kelly, her own memory extends to the remote times of the Astor expedition of 1811; and her infant life was contemporary with the explorations of Lewis and Clarke in 1805. The entire panorama of the occupation and settlement of our state has therefore passed before her eyes. She has been no careless observer of these great events; and her mind, still clear and active, retains a surprisingly vivid recollection of our early Oregon history. As thus pictured in her mind, this possesses a peculiar interest from the fact that it has been drawn exclusively from personal observation from the standpoint of the native owners of our state. Celiast, whose christian name is Helen, is the daughter of Coboway (incorrectly written Commowool by Bancroft), and dates her birth in the year 1804. Her father was the chief of the Clatsops, a tribe whose boundaries extended from the mouth of the Columbia River southward to Ecahni Mountain (Carni), eastward thence to Swallalahost or Saddle Mountain, and thence by Young’s river back to the Columbia. The Clatsops...

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Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Arethusa E. Smith

MRS. ARETHUSA E. SMITH. – Arethusa E., the daughter of Daniel Lynn, was born near Warsaw, Benton County, Missouri, June 12, 1834. As a child of six years she removed with her parents to Platte county, in the same state, remaining until 1844, the year memorable for the great flood. Mr. Lynn, being very fond of a pioneer life, determined to settle in Texas, but was unable to proceed farther than the White river country, and, being ill suited with that country, returned to Platte county. He had long heard of Oregon, and decided to cross the plains thither and in the spring of 1850 made the start. But this proved a fatal step for the hardy pioneer; for cholera attacked him on the Platte plains, and terminated his useful life. The bereaved wife and mother, Mrs. Ann Lynn, continued with the train, and arrived at Portland, almost the first of October. Soon after her arrival her daughters made homes of their own, with the exception of Miss Arethusa, who in 1851 accompanied her mother to the Umpqua valley, and lived with her at the new home near Yoncalla, where also resided Jessie Applegate, a friend of the family. On the 21st of October, 1852, she was united in marriage to Mr. Thomas Smith of Winchester, and in that delightful spot of the Umpqua has lived for nearly forty...

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Biography of William A. Johnston, Mrs.

A few days after his graduation, in June, 1879, Willis Bailey started with a span of horses for Kansas. His location was in Nemaha County, seven miles west of Seneca, the county seat. There he opened up a ranch, and on that ranch a town was subsequently started, named Baileyville. Governor Bailey took an active hand in the management of the Bailey ranch until 1906. In that year he removed to Atchison, Kansas, became vice president of the Exchange National Bank, and for over ten years had been the managing official of this institution. His interest in banking dates even earlier, since in 1895 he organized the Baileyville State Bank and had been its president ever since. He is also a director of the Exchange State Bank of Atchison, is a charter director of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Missouri, is a director in the Bankers’ Guarantee Deposit and Surety Company of Topeka, and is an active director in eight different corporations. Mr. Bailey resided at 419 L Street in Atchison. Governor Bailey had a national reputation as a stockman. Besides his extensive farming interests in Kansas he owned lands in Colorado and New Mexico. From early manhood to the present Governor Bailey had given his allegiance to the republican party. In 1888 he was elected a member of the Legislature, and in 1893 was president of...

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Biography of Mrs. Phoebe (Read) Pinkerton

Mrs. Phoebe (Read) Pinkerton. With a dignified recognition of official responsibility and the poise and charm of an intellectual woman, Mrs. Phoebe (Read) Pinkerton, register of deeds for Clay County, impresses a visitor very favorably and in a section of country where interesting personalities are by no means lacking. Mrs. Pinkerton is widely known and is universally esteemed, and was brought to Clay Center by her parents in 1878. Mrs. Pinkerton was born in the City of Manchester, England, and is a daughter of Rev. William and Margaret (Martin) Read. Both parents were born at Manchester, the father on February 7, 1834, and the mother on May 30, 1836, and both died in the United States, the father at Clay Center, Kansas, March 23, 1889, and the mother at Sedalia, Missouri, July 6, 1901. There were four children born to them, namely: Phoebe: Emma, who is the wife of Dr. T. S. Morrison, a dental surgeon practicing in Topeka, Kansas; Clara, who is the wife of J. H. Grayson, who is connected with the office force of the El Paso & South Western Railroad at Tucson, Arizona; and W. E., who is a painter and decorator at Leavenworth, Kansas. Rev. William Read, father of Mrs. Pinkerton, was reared and attended school in the City of Manchester and there learned the carpenter’s trade. In 1864 he came to the United...

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Biography of Mrs. Alice M. (Beachly) Berkeley

Mrs. Alice M. (Beachly) Berkeley. Talented in music and a leading spirit in the activities that make the modern woman who had social advantages very different from her sisters of some years ago, Mrs. Alice M. (Beachly) Berkeley, of Burr Oak, needs no introduction to many residents of Jewell County. For a number of years she had occupied, her beautiful and hospitable home, which is situated on the corner of Lewis and Water streets, Burr Oak, and is one of this city’s most esteemed and admired ladles. Mrs. Berkeley was born at Meyeradale, Pennsylvania, and is a daughter of G. L. Beachly and the widow of Mahlon C. Berkeley, who was the founder of the Jewell County National Bank. Alice M. Beachly was the eldest born of her parents three children. A sister, Berniece, died at the age of four years and six months. A brother, Eugene M., is a bookkeeper with the C. R. Cook Paint Company at Kansas City, Missouri. Her father, G. L. Beachly, who at present makes his home with her, was born at Meyersdale, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1848, and was reared there. In the same state he was married to Annie E. Beachy, an interesting association of names, who was born at Salisbury, Pennsylvania, February 17, 1856. The parents of G. L. Beachly were William M. and Sallie (Lichty) Beachly, both of whom were...

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Biography of Mary Morrall Darling

Mrs. Mary Morrall Darling is the daughter of Wamego’s pioneer physician, Dr. Albert Morrall, and she is now living in the same house where she was born May 14, 1872. The Morralls were English people and were colonial settlers in the Carolinas. Her great-great-grandfather was Daniel Morrall who married Lydia Savanen. Her great-grandfather was John Morrall. Her grandfather, George Washington Morrall, was born at Georgetown, South Carolina, August 17, 1786, became an attorney by profession, and practiced at Grahamville and at Beaufort, South Carolina, dying in the latter city February 22, 1836. He married Phoebe Jenkins Tripp, who was born January 23, 1794, and died in Barnwell District, South Carolina, April 10, 1865. Dr. Albert Morrall was born at Grahamville, South Carolina, November 17, 1829. The record of this old time physician had a distinctive place in the history of Kansas, particularly in the pioneer times of the country around the Big Blue River. He was of old Southern family and kept his sympathies with the South during the period of hostilities over slavery and the questions of state rights. He was educated in private schools at Grahamville, and first came to Kansas in the spring of 1856. He tells the story in his own words: “I came to Kansas in the spring of 1856 in company with thirty other young men from the South. My object in coming...

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Biographical Sketch of Cora Gilbert Lewis

Cora Gilbert Lewis, member of the Board of Educational Administration of Kansas, had long been interested in educational affairs in this state and had become one of the prominent Kansas women. Mrs. Lewis served as president of the Kansas Woman’s Press Association in 1901. In 1902 she was elected president of the Seventh District Federation of Women’s Clubs of Kansas. From 1903 to 1905, two years, she was president of the Kansas State Federation of Women’s Clubs and in 1905-07 was visiting member of the Kansas Board of Control. Her work as member of the Kansas Board of Educational Administration had continued for a four-year term, beginning in 1913. She is an active member of the Federation of Women’s Clubs of Kansas, of the National Education Association, of the Red Cross and is a member of the Episcopal Church. Politically Mrs. Lewis is a democrat. Cora Gilbert was born at Cameron, Missouri, a daughter of Horace Wilson and Trescinda (Wren) Gilbert, her father a native of Vermont and her mother of Kentucky. Both the Gilbert and Wren ancestry goes back to England and the Gilberts were early established in the New England states. Mrs. Lewis was educated in the public schools of Missouri and for five years was a teacher before her marriage, she was married in Kansas in 1888 to James M. Lewis, editor of the Kinsley Graphic,...

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Biography of Kate L. Cowick

Miss Kate L. Cowick, now serving her second term as county treasurer of Wyandotte County, probably had the most responsible office of any woman in Kansas. She had the business efficiency needed in the administration of such an office. She is thoroughly trained in the public service, having for many years been a teacher and administrative official of schools, and her work as county treasurer had given her not a little of justly earned fame among the women of Kansas. Miss Cowick is a native of Missouri, born at Tarkio in Atchison County on February 8, 1885. She was the youngest of the three children of Samuel R. and Katherine (Travers) Cowick. Her mother was born in the South of England and went with her parents to Ireland and from there to the State of Illinois, where she was reared and where she married Samuel R. Cowick. Samuel R. Cowick was for many years a well known flgure in newspaper work. He was editor of a Missouri paper and subsequently moved to Trego County, Kansas, locating at Wakeeny, when that town was on the frontier. There he was connected with the Western Kansas World, a paper which was established in 1879 and is the oldest journad of the county. The family had their home in Wakeeny for fourteen years, when Samuel R. Cowick moved to Lyndon, Osage County, and...

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Biography of Anna Mallows, Anna

Miss Anna Mallows. To paraphrase an old proverb, To woman’s work there is neither end or limit of capacity for human service and usefulness. Women have succssded as home makers, as teachers, in all the learned professions, in executive business, and one of the bright Kansas women, Miss Anna Mallows, is a very successful newspaper woman, proprietor, and publisher of the White Cloud Globe. The White Cloud Globe is now the only paper published in that city. It was founded in 1892 by John J. Faulkner, and throughout its twenty-five years it had never exhibited more enterprise as a real newspaper than under the present management. The offices of the plant are on Main Street, and its circulation extends all over Doniphan and surrounding counties, and many copies go to diverse parts of the United States and even to China. Politically it is a republican journal. Miss Mallows was born at White Cloud. Her father, Samuel Mallows, was born near Wilton, Norfolk County, England, in 1843, and was thirteen years of age when he came to this country with his parents. The family were among the pioneers in the rural district near Iowa Point, Kansas, and Samuel Mallows grew up on the homestead claim his father had pre-empted not far from Iowa Point in Doniphan County. His active years were passed as a farmer and he subsequently removed to...

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Biography of Harrison E. King, Mrs.

Mrs. H. E. King is one of the capable business women of Leon, Kansas, where since her husband’s death she had managed the estate, is a director in the State Bank of Leon, and had many other extensive interests in Butler County. Her husband, the late Harrison E. King, was a man of great business ability, and his untimely death at the age of forty-seven, on February 7, 1914, was a matter of general regret throughout the large community in which he was so well known. Mr. King was a man of striking appearance, possessed business judgment in a marked degree, and unquestionably was one of the coming citizens of Butler County. He was born August 3, 1869, in Mercer County, Missouri, near Leon, Iowa, which is just across the state line from Mercer County, Missouri. His father, Jacob King, was of German ancestry, was born in Mercer County, Ohio, in 1840, and after his marriage moved to Mercer County, Missouri. In 1870 he came to Butler County, Kansas, homesteading the quarter section of land where the town of Leon is built. He was a farmer and a fine type of citisen. He finally sold his farm and retired to Augusta, Kansas, where he died in 1905. He was a republican and a member of the Christian Church and an elder in that denomination. Jacob King married Lydia S....

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Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John and Leanna and Martha. I was the first little negro in the Parks kitchen. From the first they made a pet out of me. I was little like a doll and they treated me like a plaything—spoiled me—rotten. After Mr. Parks came to Arkansas he lived near what is now Prairie Grove, but what do you think it was called then—Hog Eye. Later on they named it Hillingsley for a man who settled there. We were two miles out on the Wire Road, the one the telegraph line came in on, Honey. Almost every conmunity had a ‘Wire Road’. It was the custom to give a girl a slave when she was married. When Miss Parks became Mrs. Blakeley she moved to Fayetteville and chose me to take with...

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Biography of Mrs. Lucinda J. Brearley

In a history of the settlement of a state there is usually but slight reference made to the part which the women have taken in its development. This is, of course, due to the more active connection of the pioneer men with public life, while the wives, mothers and daughters are concerned in the duties of home making. Great credit, however, is due the brave pioneer women, who stand courageously by the side of husbands and fathers, sharing with them in the hardships and dangers which accompany the development of a new section; nor is their influence a minor factor in the social, educational and moral life of the community, and therefore the names of such esteemed pioneer ladies as Mrs. Brearley well deserve a place by the side of those of the men who have laid the foundations for the growth and prosper-ity of a newly developed region. Her husband, John Brearley, was the pioneer banker of Lewiston, and for many years was connected with its business interests. He was born in Hudson, Michigan, in 1839. His parents being early settlers of that state. In 1855 he crossed the plains with an ox team and spent several years in Sacramento. In 1862 he removed to Elk City, where he engaged in mining, making considerable money, after which he purchased the express business between that place and Lewiston, carrying...

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