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Topic: Will

Will Of Lionell Chute

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The will of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, dated 4: 7 mo: 1644, was proved in court at Ipswich 7: 9 mo: 1645. The original instrument has not been found, and the following copy is from the record in Ipswich deeds, book i, leaf 15. The fourth day of the eleventh month Anno Dm 1644 I Lionell Chute of the Towne of Ipfwch in New England Schoolmafter doe make & ordayne this my laft will & Teftament (revoking all form wills by me made.) Item I give vntd Rofe my wife for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling howfe with the Barne &all the edifices: (the two chambers over the howfe & entry only excepted which I will that James my fonne fhall have to his only vfe for the Terme of one yeare next after my deceafe with free ingreffe, egreffe, & regreffe & wth the yards, gardens, the home-lott & planting lott purchaffed of Mr. Bartlemew with the Comonage and appurtenances therevnto belonging. And after my wives deceafe; I give the faid howfe, barne, lotts & premiffes with all thappurtenances vnto James Chute my fonne & to his heires. Item I give vnto my faid fonne James Chute & to his heires for ever all & fingular my other lands, lotts, meadow...

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Will of Richard Woodman

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The nuncupative will of Richard Woodman of Lynn was sworn to in Salem quarterly court 30: 10: 1647. The following is a copy of the original on file in the office of the clerk of courts at Salem, volume I, leaf 89. The will of Richard Woodman of the Towne of Lynn defeced [deceased] as foloweth [follows] Being fpoken [spoken] to by Nicholas (Potter) to make his will Paid that he would make his will and being asked by John Gillow too whome [whom] he would giue [give] his goods faid [said] that he would giue [give] fower [four] pounds to the Elders of lynn fortie [forty] fhilings [shillings] a yeere [year], and all the reft [rest] of his goods he would giue [give] to Jofeph Redknap Richard more and (to) his mafter [master] John Gillow, equally to either of them alike and yet Jofeph Redknap he did make his executor. [execator] Witneffes [Witness] to this will John Gillow & Richard Moore witness that Jofeph Redknap is the executor John Gillow Source: The Essex Antiquarian May...

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Will of John Lowell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The following is a copy of the will of John Lowell of Newbury transcribed from the ancient copy on file in the probate office in Boston. It was proved 27: 8: 1647. The Laft [last] will & Teftament [Testament] of John Lowle Late of Newberry deceafed [deceased] made this nine & twentieth of the fowrth [forth] mounth 1647. That I John Lowle of Newberry beeing in Pfect [perfect] vnderstanding [understanding] knowing my ffrailty [frailty] doe [do] declare this to bee [be] my last will & Tefament [testament]; ftedfaftly [faithfully] beleiveing that when I goe [go] hence I shall reft [rest] in Glory through my Savior the Lord Jesus Cht [Christ]. As for the Eftate [faith] the Lord hath given me heare [here] I thus difpofe of it : I give unto my wife Elizabeth Lowle one halfe [half] of my estate whether it Consifts [comes] in Goods within or without Land Howses [houses] Cattell [cattle] Household stuffe [stuff] meddowes [meadows] land brocken [broken] or vnbrokne [unbroken] or what elfe [else] Alfoe my said wife to Chufe Twenty pownds [pounds] out of the refidewe of that eftate [estate] which Came by her mother fformerly [formerly] or latter, The reft [rest] of my eftate [estate] to be devided [divided] equally betweene [between] my Sonn [sons] John Lowle, Mary...

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Will Of Robert Hunter

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The will of Robert Hunter, dated 5: 6mo: 1647, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following copy is taken from the record contained in the Ipswich Deeds, volume 1, leaf 25, the original being missing. This 5th of the 6th month 1647. I Robert Hunter weak of body but of pfect memory prayfed be god doe make & ordayne this to be my laft will & Teftament. firft all my debts being paid I leave my howfe & lott to my wife Mary Hunter for Terme of her life. Item all my goods within the howfe I give to my wife Item I give unto Thomas Birkby one little Browne Heffer that corns two yeares and my fhop geare Item I give unto fome poore in the Church of Rowley ten pounds to be paid out of two mares of which ten pounds ten shillings I give to Richard Clarke Ite ten shillings to John Dresfer Item to John Burbant 108. Item to William Jackson 106. Item to Jane Grant I give 108. Item to Sifly wood 108. Item 301 to Margaret Crosfe 108. Item I give to William Stickne 208. & all my workiday clothes Item to Thomas Elethorp 108. Item I give to mris Shove 408 which I desire may...

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Will Of Richard Bartlett

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The nuncupative will of Richard Bartlett, sr., of Newbury, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following is a copy of the same as recorded in the Ipswich Deeds, volume I, leaf 25. The testimony of William Titcombe & Anthony Somersby concerning the last will & testament of Richard Bartlett fen of Newbury deceased the 20th of May 1647. About a month before he deceased we being with him & two of his sonnes being prfent he being very ill & had been weak all the spring finding in himself that he was not like to continue he desired us to take notice what his mind was concerning that small estate he had how he would dispose of it. As for his son John Bartlett he had done for him more then for the rest of his children & at that time did not dispose any to him. To his sonne Christofer Bartlett he did bequeath the debt which lately he had borrowed of him which was five bushels of wheat if foe be it should please the lord to take him away at this sickness or else if he should lye long visited his necessity would require that he should pay it again. To his daughter Johan wife of William Titcomb he...

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Genealogy of John Peter Stoneburner

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Peter Stoneburner, fifth child of Johann Peter and Susanna Stoneburner, was born in Virginia before his parents moved to Morgan Co., Ohio. It was probably in Ohio that he married Catherine sometime around 1810. On the 12th of October 1879-john Stoneburner wrote his will. It read: “In the name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, John Stoneburner of the State of Ohio and of the County of Morgan, do make and publish this my Last will and testament Item 1st–I wish my Beloved Wife to remain on the Farm and in the House where we now reside and to have the third of the produce of the whole farm-and one Horse, and one Cow, and all the household and kitchen furniture. During her natural life. Item 2nd–whereas I have paid unto Jonathon and Robert my two sons one hundred and fifty dollars each-and sixty five dollars to Susanna Collins one of my daughters; now it is my will and wish that Sampson my sone shall have fifty acres off of the south side of the Farm before mentioned, in lue of his full share of the real estate for which I this day make him a deed; and he is to pay the thirds of the produce of the same, to me and my...

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Genealogy of Samuel Austin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Samuel, only surviving son of Henry and Elizabeth Lyles Austin, continued living in Calvert County, Maryland. By 1730, Samuel was married to Elizabeth Marshall, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Marshall. They had eleven surviving children when Samuel’s will was written in 1763. Some of their children moved to Virginia, specifically Albemarle County. Samuel Austin’s will of 1763 read: “In the name of God amen. I Samuel Austin of Calvert County in the province of Maryland, planter being in good health of body and of sound anal perfect mind and memory, I do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form following. First I desire that my debts may be paid and discharged at the discretion of my executor hereafter named and as touching the temporal estate that it hath been pleased God to bestow upon me I do give and bequeath in manner and form following. First I do give and bequeath unto my son William Austin that part of my land to the westward of the church rode and his heirs forever and one negro boy named George and one negro woman named Sarah. Next I do give and bequeath unto my son James Austin and his heirs forever all my land to the eastward of the church rode and...

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Genealogy of Henry Austin

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Austin as a surname is a variation of Augustine or Augustus. The Austin line enters the Spracklin line with the marriage of George E. Spracklin to Grace Belle Austin on 29 March 1903. There have been several Austin coats of arms granted as early as 1660 but many of the lines have died out. This particular Austin line came early to Calvert Co., Maryland. They were planters, that is, owners of plantations and more than likely raised tobacco on the land there. To help them with their plantations, they owned slaves as evidenced by wills. And it is quite possible, that the early Austin’s had close associations with the Quakers of early Maryland. According to the wills, the Austin men remembered their God who blessed them with all that they had. Many of the heraldic symbols in Austin’s’ arms were crosses. The motto: “Trust in God and He will give strength” seems quite appropriate. It is quite probable that the Austin family came from England to New England sometime around 1665. Likewise the Harrisons, Lyles and quite possibly the Marshalls all came to Maryland around the same time. Samuel and Henry Austin, sons of Thomas Austin, came to Calvert Co., Md. Henry Austin was born before 1687 and died in Calvert Co., Md. He had married...

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Walter Woodworth

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Walter Woodworth came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. Was assigned the third lot on Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of the present Greenbush or South Scituate R. R. Station, which was in early times called Walter Woodworth’s Hill, and in 1666 he became a purchaser of sixty acres at Weymouth. In 1640 Walter was assessed nine shillings for the public use, and March 2, 1641, freeman; and in June 4, 1645, he was appointed surveyor of highways in Scituate, and again in 1646 and 1656. His name appears frequently on the town records of Scituate as juror, etc. In 2654 he was a member of the First Church, which ordained Charles Chancy as their minister. Origin of Woodward Name This ancient name of Woodward is derived from the forest keepers, the Woodwards of the Hundred Rolls in the reign of Edward 1st. The Arms used by the Woodward Family of Kent, England Richard Woodward of Woodmarsh and his son...

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Mark Haskell Fourth Generation

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now MARK4 (Mark,3 Marks2 Mark1), baptized March 16, 1729; d. Aug. 29, 1811; lived at the ferry. He first learned the earthern-ware business at Danvers ; but through dislike of his occupation he removed back to Marblehead, and assumed that of a shoreman. Aug. 29, 17555, he sold to Susannah, widow of Mark Haskell, his father, a house and land, bounded S. W. on the street by the new meeting-house (now Unitarian), 28 feet S. on Strikers land, E. 011 Batchelder’s land, Mark to a stake &c., leaving 22 feet on land of said 13 inches from the south corner of “my house.” Aug. 25, 1755, he bought of the above-said Susannah Haskell, who was administuatrix of the estate of Philip Hubbard, “the late mansion house and land formerly belonging to said Hubbard, bounded S. on the street [Mugford Street] opposite the new meeting-house, N. W. on Phillips, E. on Batchelder, and S. E. on Striker.” Sept. 2,1765, he bought of Mary White, widow (probably of Thomas) one acre of land at the ferry “near Noggs head,” and bounded on the sea. Sept. 8, 1173, he sold to Capt. Jona. Glover, of Marblehead, merchant, one half right of a lien in middle division No. 22, and formerly in possession of Sarah Merritt. Dec. 16, 1179, he sold...

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Mark Haskell

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (1) MARK HASKELL1 brother to Roger and William, settled in Beverly, where he died 1668—9. His inventory was taken Jan. 27, of that year, by Thomas Lathrop and Richard Brackenbury, and presented in court, March 30, 1669. His clear estate was £370 8s. 3d. — £200 of which was awarded to his two sons, viz. “William, the eldest, to have a double portion. Mark, the youngest, the bal. of the £200. Hannah Hascall to have £110 8s 3d” In the inventory there is mentioned a “ Ketch at sea,” which would be appraised on its arrival home, and rendered into court. An additional appraise­ment was rendered by Thomas Woodbury, William Hardy, and Hugh Woodbury, of Beverly. Some of the items mentioned in the list of debts due from the estate are as follows: “John Budd, of Long Island. Mr. Brown, of Salem. To his daughter in Law. To William Haskell. To John Haskell. To Thomas Chubb.” From the foregoing it would appear, by the mention of his daughter-in-law, that he had another son who died before him, perhaps without issue. Unfortunately, their names, with that of his father-in-law, were not mentioned. Mark, Sen., was undoubtedly the younger of the three brothers. He appears to have been a mariner, and engaged in the fishing business. The first...

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Robert Love – Will

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (13 May 1842) Col. Robert Love’s Will, (1760 to 1845) In the name of God, Amen! I, Robert Love, of the town of Waynesville in the County of Haywood in the State of North Carolina, at this time being in reasonable health and sound and disposing mind and memory-thanks be to the Giver of All Blessings for his kind & tender mercies to me-but calling to mind the mortality of my Body, and believing that it is right and necessary for all men, as the Good old Book saith, to dispose of all their household and all the worldly concerns in order at the time they are the most capable, and now under this connection I do make, ordain and publish this and this only to be, my last Will and Testament, in manner and form following, that is to say, FIRST, I give my soul to Almighty God, who first gave it me, and my body to the Earth to be decently buried, and as to my worldly estate, I give and bequeath it in the following manner, (towit) First, I give, devise and bequeath to the children of my oldest son, Thomas D. Love, no deceased, and to their heirs and to Dillard Love, my third son, and to his heirs, all the land...

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Thomas Dillard – Will

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (23 Sep 1874) In the Name of God, Amen! I, Thomas Dillard, of the County of Washington, in the State of North Carolina, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament: First, I lend to my wife during her natural life, or widowhood, the whole of my Negroes, except those given by legacy, but in case of her marriage, that the help of said Negroes descend and be divided amongst my children here named: to Ben Dillard, Wennesoppea, Mary Ann, Thomas, Stacy, Martha, Amy, John and Rebecca, and the other part with all the stock and movable at my said wife’s death to be divided equally amongst the aforesaid children. Second, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Elizabeth Anthony, Negro Inda, with her increase. I let her have at the same time and do devise, that is all I do intend for her to have of my estate. Third, I give and bequeath to my son, Benja. Dillard, Negro Piler and Joe, with the Virginia Bond Warrant for one thousand acres of land what I have already delivered to my said son with the Negroes aforesaid, and do declare that to be all that I do intend for him to have of my estate and lands. Fourth, I give to my daughter, Wennesoppea,...

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Ann Taylor Love – Will

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (4 May 1849) Last Will and Testament of Anna Taylor Love, consort of Thomas D. Love, deceased. I, Anna Love, being of sound and disposing mind, but weak of body, do make, ordain and establish this my Last Will and Testament: First, I give my soul to God, to be disposed of according to his good pleasure, and my body to the Earth to be buried in a Christian like manner. Secondly. I will that my Executor, hereinafter named, pay all my just debts, and that he raise a fund for that purpose out of the debts due me, and by a sale of any western land that I may possess as one of the heirs of Nathaniel Taylor, deceased, my Father, or any landed interest lying anywhere else, except, my interest in the farm I live on. If my landed interest will not pay my debts when sold, or if sales at a fair price cannot be effected, then and in that case my executor is hereby authorized to sell such of my Negroes, or Negro interest as will effect this object. Thirdly. I give and bequeath to my son, Robert Love, my interest in the farm I live on till my youngest child comes of age, also the benefits of a bond I hold...

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Thomas D. Love – Will

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now (13 Nov 1832) Last Will of Thomas D. Love, (My Grandfather-F.D. Love) I, Thomas D. Love, being of sound mind and memory, but sick of body, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament: First. I give my soul to God to be disposed to according to His righteous purposes, and my earth to be buried in a Christian life manner. Secondly. I will that my Executors hereafter named pay all my just debts, and that they raise a fund to do that by the collection of debts due me, and by the sale of such of my personal property as can be best spared. Thirdly. I will that all my real and personal property be divided equally among my children as they come of age, that is, to say; I will the possession and use of all my real and personal property to my beloved wife, Anna, to be by her use in any way to make it most productive of profit for the support of herself and support and education of my children until my youngest child comes of age; and then a division to be made equally among said children and herself, counting herself a child part, which shall be in value equal to twice the amount allotted to each child,...

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