Topic: Weapemeoc

Weapemeoc Indians

Weapemeoc Tribe: Meaning unknown, but evidently a place name. Also called: Yeopim, a shortened and more usual form. Weapemeoc Connections. The Weapemeoc were almost certainly of the Algonquian linguistic family and related to the Powhatan Indians the north and the Chowan, Machapunga, and Pamlico to the south. Weapemeoc Location. Most of the present Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, and Perquimans Counties, and part of Chowan County north of Albemarle Sound. Weapemeoc Subdivisions. In the same section in later times are given the following tribes which must be regarded as subdivisions of the Weapemeoc: Pasquotank, on Pasquotank River. Perquiman, on Perquimans River. Poteskeet, location uncertain. Yeopim, or Weapemeoc proper, on Yeopim River. Weapemeoc Villages Chepanoc, on Albemarle Sound in Perquimans County. Mascoming, on the north shore of Albemarle Sound, in Chowan County. Metachkwem, location unknown. Pasquenock, perhaps identical with Pasquotank, on the north shore of Albemarle Sound, perhaps in Camden County. Weapemeoc, probably in Pasquotank County. Weapemeoc History. The Weapemeoc first appear in history in the narratives of the Raleigh colony of 1585-86. Later they are spoken of under the various subdivisional names. They parted with some of their land in 1662. In 1701, according to Lawson (1860), only 6 of the Yeopim survived though there were 40 warriors of the other subdivisions, including 10 Pasquotank and 30 Potekeet. Weapemeoc Population. In the time of the Raleigh colony the Weapemeoc are said...

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Weapemeoc Tribe

Weapemeoc Indians. An Algonquian (?) tribe met by Raleigh’s colonists in 1584-89, occupying the territory north of Albemarle Island, North Carolina, including probably most of what is now Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, and Perquimans counties. Their chief town, of the same name, seems to have been in Pasquotank County. Other towns apparently in the same jurisdiction were Pasquenock (Pasquotank?), Chepanoc, and Mascoming. They were said then to have 700 or 800 (warriors), under their chief Okisco. A century later the same territory was occupied by the Yeopim or Jaupim (Weapon-oc?), Pasquotank, Perquiman, and Poteskeet. In 1662 the Yeopim chief sold lands. In 1701, according to Lawson, the other bands still counted 40 warriors, but of the Yeopim only one man...

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