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Topic: Wea

Indian Treaties Waco to Yakima

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaties for all tribes listed below. Names in (parentheses) are other names used for tribe Waco, Walla Walla, Wasco, Wea, Winnebago, Witchetaw, Wyandot and Yakima Tribes Waco Treaties (Wacoe) Treaty of May 15, 1846 Walla-Walla Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of June 9, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wasco Treaties Treaty of June 25, 1855 Treaty of November 15, 1865 Wea Treaties Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of June 7, 1803 Treaty of August 21, 1805 Treaty of September 30, 1809 Treaty of October 26, 1809 Treaty of June 4, 1816 Treaty of October 2, 1818 Treaty of August 11, 1820 Treaty of October 29, 1832 Treaty of May 30, 1854 Treaty of February 23, 1867 Winnebago Treaties Treaty of June 3, 1816 Treaty of August 19, 1825 Treaty of August 11, 1827 Treaty of August 25, 1828 Treaty of August 1, 1829 Treaty of September 15, 1832 Treaty of November 1, 1837 Treaty of October 13, 1846 Treaty of February 27, 1855 Treaty of April 15, 1859 Treaty of March 8, 1865 Witchetaw Treaties (Wichita, Wicheta, Ouichita) Treaty of August 24, 1835 Treaty of May 15, 1846 Wyandot Treaties (Wyandotte, Wiandot) Treaty of January 21, 1785 Treaty of January 9, 1789 Treaty of August 3, 1795 Treaty of August 7, 1803...

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Treaty of July 22, 1814

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, Senecas, and Miamies. The said United States of America, by William Henry Harrison, late a major general in the army of the United States, and Lewis Cass, governor of the Michigan territory, duly authorized and appointed commissioners for the purpose, and the said tribes, by their head men, chiefs, and warriors, assembled at Greenville, in the state of Ohio, have agreed to the following articles, which, when ratified by the president of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, shall be binding upon them and the said tribes. Article 1. The United States and the Wyandots, Delawares, Shawanoese, and Senecas, give peace to the Miamie nation of Indians, formerly designated as the Miamie Eel River and Weea tribes; they extend this indulgence also to the bands of the Putawatimies, which adhere to the Grand Sachem Tobinipee, and to the chief Onoxa, to the Ottawas of Blanchard’s creek, who have attached themselves to the Shawanoese tribe, and to such of the said tribe as adhere to the chief called the Wing, in the neighborhood of Detroit, and to the Kickapoos, under the direction of their chiefs who sign...

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Treaty of August 11, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner for that purpose on the part of the United States, of the one part; and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Wea tribe of Indians, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, agree to cede, and they do hereby cede and relinquish, to the United States all the lands reserved by the second article of the Treaty between the United States and the said Tribe, concluded at Saint Mary’s, on the second day of October, eighteen hundred and eighteen. Article II. The sum of five thousand dollars, in money and goods, which is now paid and delivered by the United States, the receipt whereof the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said Tribe, do hereby acknowledge, is considered by the parties a full compensation for the cession and relinquishment above mentioned. Article III. As it is contemplated by the said Tribe, to remove from the Wabash, it is agreed, that the annuity secured to the Weas, by the Treaty of Saint Mary’s, above mentioned, shall hereafter be paid to them at Kaskaskia, in the state of Illinois. Article IV. This Treaty, as soon as it is ratified by the President and Senate of the...

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Treaty of June 4, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States. Article II.The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties which they have respectively made with the United States. Article III. The boundary line, surveyed and marked by the United States, of the land on the Wabash and White rivers, ceded in the year eighteen hundred and nine, the said tribes do hereby explicitly recognize and confirm, as having been executed conformably to the several treaties they have made with the United States. Article IV. The chiefs and warriors of the said tribe of the Kickapoos acknowledge that they have ceded to the United States all that tract of country which lies between the aforesaid boundary line on the north west side of the Wabash-the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from...

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Treaty of May 30, 1854

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this thirtieth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates representing the united tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria, Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, viz: Kio-kaw-mo-zan, David Lykins; Sa-wa-ne-ke-ah, or Wilson; Sha-cah-quah, or Andrew Chick; Ta-ko-nah, or Mitchel; Che-swa-wa, or Rogers; and Yellow Beaver, they being duly authorized thereto by the said Indians. Article 1. The tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria Indians, and of Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, parties to the two treaties made with them respectively by William Clark, Frank J. Allen, and Nathan Kouns, commissioners on the part of the United States, at Castor Hill, on the twenty-seventh and twenty-ninth days of October, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, having recently in joint council assembled, united themselves into a single tribe, and having expressed a desire to be recognized and regarded as such, the United States hereby assent to the action of said joint council to this end, and now recognize the delegates who sign and seal this instrument as the authorized representatives of said consolidated tribe. Article 2. The said Kaskaskias and Peorias, and the said Piankeshaws and Weas, hereby cede and convey to the...

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Treaty of October 26, 1809

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A convention entered into at Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, between William Henry Harrison, commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for treating with the Indian tribes north-west of the Ohio and the Wea tribe. The said tribe, by their Sachems and head warriors, hereby declare their full and free consent to the treaty concluded at fort Wayne, on the thirtieth ultimo, by the above mentioned commissioner, with the Delaware, Miami, Putawatimie, and Eel river tribes; and also to the separate article entered into on the same day with the Miami and Eel river tribes. And the said commissioner, on the part of the United States, agrees to allow the said Indian tribe an additional annuity of three hundred dollars, and a present sum of fifteen hundred dollars, in consideration of the relinquishment made in the first article of said treaty; and a further permanent annuity of one hundred dollars, as soon as the Kickapoos can be brought to give their consent to the ninth article of said treaty. In testimony whereof, the said William Henry Harrison, and the sachems and head warriors of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands and affixed their seals, this twenty-sixth day of October, eighteen hundred and nine. William H. Harrison Jacco, his x mark Shawanee, his x mark Tosania,...

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Treaty of October 29, 1832

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Castor Hill in the county of St. Louis and State of Missouri, between William Clark, Frank J. Allen, and Nathan Kouns, Commissioners on the part of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors and Counselors, of the Piankeshaw and Wea tribes of Indians, in behalf of their said tribes, of the other part. Article 1.The undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and considerate men, for themselves and their said tribes, for and in consideration of the stipulations hereinafter made, do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States forever, all their right, title and interest to and in lands within the States of Missouri and Illinois-hereby confirming all treaties heretofore made between their respective tribes and the United States, and relinquishing to them all claim to every portion of their lands which may have been ceded by any portion of their said tribes. Article 2.The United States cede to the Piankeshaw and Wea tribes, for their permanent residence, two hundred and fifty sections of land within the limits of the survey of the lands set apart for the Piankeshaws, Weas, and Peorias, bounded east by the western boundary line of the State of Missouri for fifteen miles; north, by the southern boundary of the lands assigned...

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Treaty of February 23, 1867

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement, concluded at Washington, D. C., the twenty-third day of February, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, between the United States, represented by Lewis V. Bogy, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, W. H. Watson, special commissioner, Thomas Murphy, superintendent of Indian Affairs, George C. Snow, and G. A. Colton, U. S. Indian agents, duly authorized, and the Senecas, represented by George Spicer and John Mush; the Mixed Senecas and Shawnees, by John Whitetree, John Young, and Lewis Davis; the Quapaws, by S. G. Vallier and Ka-zhe-cah; the Confederated Peorias, Kaskaskias, Weas, and Piankeshaws, by Baptiste Peoria, John Mitchell, and Edward Black; the Miamies, by Thomas Metosenyah and Thomas Richardville, and the Ottawas of Blanchard’s Fork and Roche de Boeuf, by John White and J. T. Jones, and including certain Wyandott[e]s, represented by Tauromee, or John Hat, and John Karaho. Whereas it is desirable that arrangements should be made by which portions of certain tribes, parties hereto, now residing in Kansas, should be enabled to remove to other lands in the Indian country south of that State, while other portions of said tribes desire to dissolve their tribal relations, and become citizens; and whereas it is necessary to provide certain tribes, parties hereto, now residing in the Indian country, with means of rebuilding their houses, re-opening...

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Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.

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Treaty of June 7, 1803

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by their chiefs and head warriors, and those of the Eel River, Weea, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia by their agents and representatives Tuthinipee, Winnemac, Richerville and Little Turtle (who are properly authorized by the said tribes) of the other part. Article 1. Whereas it is declared by the fourth article of the treaty of Greenville, that the United States reserve for their use the post of St. Vincennes and all the lands adjacent to which the Indian titles had been extinguished: And whereas, it has been found difficult to determine the precise limits of the said tract as held by the French and British governments: it is hereby agreed, that the boundaries of the said tract shall be...

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Treaty of August 21, 1805

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Pottawatimies, Miames, Eel River, and Weas. Articles of a treaty made and entered into, at Grouseland, near Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, by and between William Henry Harrison, governor of said territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for treating with the north western tribes of Indians, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delewares, Putawatimis, Miamis, Eel River, and Weas, jointly and severally by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. Whereas, by the fourth article of a treaty made between the United States and the Delaware tribe, on the eighteenth day of August, eighteen hundred and four, the said United States engaged to consider the said Delewares as the proprietors of all that tract of country which is bounded by the White river on the north, the Ohio and Clark’s grant on the south, the general boundary line running from the mouth of Kentucky river on the east, and the tract ceded by the treaty of fort Wayne, and the road leading to Clark’s grant on the west and south west. And whereas, the Maimi tribes, from whom the Delawares derived their claim, contend that...

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Wea Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Wea Indians (probably a contraction of the local name Wawaagtenang, ‘place of the round, or curved, channel’ (Schoolcraft); possibly contracted from Wayahtónuki, ‘eddy people,’ from waysqtonwi, `eddy,’ both renderings coming from the same root. Wawaqtenang was the common Algonquian name for Detroit. (Cf. Wawyachtonoc). A subtribe of the Miami. They are first mentioned in the Jesuit Relation for 1673 as living in east Wisconsin. In the later distribution of the tribes of the confederacy they occupied the most westerly position. Allouez in 1680 found a Wea town on St Joseph River, Indiana. Marquette visited a Wea village at Chicago which Courtemanche found still there in 1701. A part of them were for a time with the bands of various tribes gathered about La Salle’s fort near Peoria, Ill. La Salle says their band had 35 cabins. In 1719 their chief village, Ouiatenon, was on the Wabash, below the mouth of Wea creek, where, according to Charlevoix, they were living nearly half a century before. This is possibly identical with “Les Gros” village of a document of 1718. Besides this they had two or three villages near by. Ouiatenon was one of the principal headquarters of the French traders. In 1757 the Wea and Piankashaw endeavored to come into friendly relations with the whites, and an agreement...

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History of the Chicago Tribes

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Such were the three tribes that we know once occupied the territory where the city of Chicago now stands, but in order to understand their coming and going, the history of this part of the Great Lakes region must be briefly considered. When the accounts of the great French explorers and priests such as Champlain, La Salle, and Marquette first describe the state of the tribes, we find the Iroquois Confederacy, located in what is now the State of New York, to be the dominant military...

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Indians of The Chicago Region

The region around the southern end of Lake Michigan where the city of Chicago now stands has been the home of many peoples and the scene of much conflict in historic and probably in prehistoric times. It is the purpose of this essay to give in a brief outline the sequence of those peoples in so far as they are known, and to depict the background from which emerges the great commercial city of today. The history of the region as it pertains to the white man is well known, but before his advent and during the stirring conflicts of colonial tunes the various Indian tribes of the Great Lakes played a large part, and it is with the Indians that this article is mainly concerned.

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