Topic: War of 1812

Muster-Roll Of Capt. Wm. Potter’s Company

[From the original in the Comptroller’s office, at Hartford.] MUSTER ROLL of the 8th Company of Infantry under the command of CAPTAIN WM. POTTER in the Thirtieth Regiment of Con. Militia in service of the United States, at Stonington, commanded by Lieut. Col. WM. RANDALL, from the 9th of August when last mustered, to the 27th of August 1814.– “Names and Rank. Commencement Expiration Alterations and Remarks of service. of service. Remarks since last muster.” “Captain”, William Potter, Aug. 9 Aug. 27 “Lieut.” Horatio G. Lewis, ” 9 ” 27 {detached for service “Ensign”, Daniel Frink, ” 9 ” 23 { and ordered to N. { London, Aug. 22. “Sergeants:” Francis Amy, ” 19 ” 27 Charles H. Smith, ” 9 ” 27 Peleg Hancox, ” 22 ” 27 Gurdon Trumbull, ” 9 ” 27 “Corporals:” Azariah Stanton jr., ” 16 ” 27 Junia Cheesebrough, ” 9 ” 27 Joshua Swan jr., ” 22 ” 27 “Privates:” {detached for service Phineas Wilcox, ” 9 ” 23 { and ordered to N. { London, Aug. 23. Hamilton White, ” 9 ” 27 {detached for service Henry Wilcox, ” 9 ” 23 { and ordered to N. { London, Aug. 23. Nathan Wilcox, ” 9 ” 27 Samuel Burtch, ” 9 ” 27 Jonathan Palmer, ” 9 ” 27 Andrew P. Stanton, ” 9 ” 27 James Stanton, Aug. 9 Aug....

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Account Of The Attack, Published By The Borough Authorities

ACCOUNT OF THE ATTACK, FURNISHED FOR PUBLICATION, BY THE MAGISTRATES, WARDEN AND BURGESSES.[14] [From the Conn. Gazette, Sept. 7th,] “Stonington Borough, Aug. 29, 1814.” “Mr.” Green–In relation to the extraordinary attack of the enemy, of the 9th inst., on this village, the public have been furnished with various accounts; and though the circumstantial and generally correct account given in your paper [of the 7th of August,] precludes the necessity of a recapitulation of the whole transaction, yet this village having been the object of the attack and resentment of Sir Thomas, the Magistrates, Warden and Burgesses residing therein, feeling deeply interested that some official document comprehending a supply of some facts not given, and alteration of others, and a general statement relative to the whole, should be published,–offer the public the following statement: On Tuesday afternoon of the 9th inst. anchored off our harbor, the frigate “Pactolus”, the “Terror”, a bomb ship, and the brig “Dispatch” of 20 guns. From the difficulty of the navigation in Fisher’s Island Sound, we have been generally impressed that such ships of war dare not approach us; but the presumption of the enemy has created new fears, and we think it our duty to say, that further means of defense and protection ought to be afforded us; this we have often requested. Various were the opinions respecting the object of the enemy, but...

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Letter From Capt. Amos Palmer To The Secretary Of War

[From Niles’s Weekly Register, Oct. 21, 1815.] DEFENCE OF STONINGTON. The defense of Stonington by a handful of brave citizens was more like an effusion of feeling, warm from the heart, than a concerted military movement. The result of it, we all know, and it afforded sincere delight to every patriot. But the particulars we have never seen so accurately described as in the following concise narrative from the chairman of the committee of defense, to the Secretary of War, of which we have been provided with a copy for publication.–“Nat. Intelligencer.” “Stonington Borough, Aug. 21, 1815. To the Hon. Wm. H. Crawford, Secretary of War. SIR: The former Secretary of War put into my hands, as chairman of the committee of defense, the two 18-pounders and all the munitions of war that were here, belonging to the general government, to be used for the defense of the town,–and I gave my receipt for the same. As there is no military officer here, it becomes my duty to inform you [of] the use we have made of it. That on the 9th of August last [year], the “Ramilies” 74, the “Pactolus” 44, the “Terror” bomb-ship, and the “Despatch” gun brig, anchored off the harbor. Commodore Hardy sent off a boat, with a flag; we met him with another from the shore, when the officer of the flag handed me...

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Extract From Gen. Root’s Speech In Congress, 1817

In the House of Representatives, on the Bill to provide for the payment of Militia called out by State authority, and not placed under the command of the United States. [After animadverting with great severity on the affair at Pettipaug point,[19] and the course pursued by Governor Smith, of Connecticut, for the defense of New London]– “There was “one” achievement, said Mr. R., which brightened the annals of Connecticut and shed lustre on the American character. He alluded to the “Defense of Stonington”. A more brilliant affair, said he, had not taken place during the late war. It was not rivalled by the defense of Sandusky, the glorious triumph on the Niagara, nor the naval victories on Erie and Champlain. And yet that heroic exploit is claimed in favor of Governor Smith’s militia, and is to gild the pill which we are called upon to swallow. The detached militia, said Mr. R., had nothing to do in that affair. It was achieved by fourteen democrats, “volunteer” democrats, who were determined to defend the town or perish in its ruins. Commodore Hardy, fearful that that democratic town would send torpedoes among his squadron, demanded a pledge that no harm should be done to his ships. No pledge being given, and after advising the removal of women and children from the town, the enemy made a vigorous attack, first in barges,...

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The Battle Of Stonington, By Philip Freneau

BY PHILIP FRENEAU. “In an attack upon the town and a small fort of two guns, by the “RAMILLIES”, seventy-four gun ship, commanded by Sir Thomas Hardy; the “PACTOLUS”, 38 gun ship; “DESPATCH” brig, and a razee, or bomb ship,–August, 1814.” Four gallant ships from England came Freighted deep with fire and flame, And other things we need not name, To have a dash at Stonington. Now safely moor’d, their work begun, They thought to make the Yankees run, And have a mighty deal of fun In stealing sheep at Stonington. A deacon then popp’d up his head, And Parson Jones’s sermon read, In which the reverend doctor said That they must fight for Stonington. A townsman bade them, next, attend To sundry resolutions penn’d, By which they promised to defend With sword and gun old Stonington. The ships advancing different ways, The Britons soon began to blaze, And put th’ old women in amaze, Who feared the loss of Stonington. The Yankees to their fort repair’d, And made as though they little cared For all that came–though very hard The cannon play’d on Stonington. The “Ramillies” began the attack, “Despatch” came forward–bold and black–And none can tell what kept them back From setting fire to Stonington. The bombardiers with bomb and ball Soon made a farmer’s barrack fall, And did a cow-house sadly maul That stood a mile...

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Celebrations Of The Battle of Stonington

1815. Thursday, Aug. 10th, the first anniversary of the battle, was observed as a day of thanksgiving and prayer. The old flag was again hoisted on the flag-staff at the battery: and a procession, formed at that place, marched to the Congregational meeting-house, to listen to a discourse by the pastor, Rev. Ira Hart. On its conclusion, the procession returned to the battery, where the exercises of the day were closed by prayer. “On Friday evening a grand anniversary ball was given; the assembly being both numerous and brilliant.”–“Conn. Gazette, Aug. 23d.” 1818. Celebration at the Borough, on Monday, Aug. 10th. “The company was very numerous, and the business of the day went off with great eclat.”–“Id. Aug. 12th, 1818.” 1824. An Oration was delivered at the Congregational meeting-house, by Rev. David Austin, “characteristic of his talents, patriotism, and eloquence.” The concourse of citizens from Stonington and the neighboring towns was unusually large and respectable. An excellent dinner was provided by Major Babcock, at the Borough Hotel, to which a large number of citizens and invited guests did ample justice. The following were among the volunteer toasts: By Capt. Edmund Fanning. “The Grasshopper Fort”[B]–may it never be forgotten by those whom it defended. By Samuel Copp, Esq. “American Eighteen-pounders”–as handled in the Grasshopper Fort. By Gen. J. Isham. “August 10th, 1814”–May no vile calumniator hereafter attempt to tarnish the...

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Defense of Stonington Notes

NOTE 1, page 9. Stonington Borough, incorporated by the Legislature [of Connecticut,] in 1801, is situated on a narrow point of land about half a mile in length, at the eastern extremity of Long Island sound. On its eastern side lies Paucatuck bay, and on its west the harbour, terminating in Lambert’s Cove. It has four [two] principal streets running north and south, intersected at right angles by nine cross streets, and contains about one hundred and twenty dwelling houses and stores. It has also two houses for public worship, an academy, where the languages are taught, and two common schools; two rope-walks, commodious wharves, and ware houses for storage…. In the census of 1810, the “town” contained 3043 inhabitants, and there are now [1819], 335 qualified electors.–“Pease & Niles’s Gazetteer of Connecticut.” NOTE 2, page 9. Sir Thomas Masterman Hardy, Bart.–afterwards Vice-Admiral, and G. C. B.,–was at this time not far from thirty-five years of age. He entered the British navy, as a midshipman, at twelve; and was promoted to the rank of commander in 1797, for distinguished gallantry in the capture of a French brig, under the walls of Vera Cruz. He commanded the “Mutine” brig, in the battle of the Nile,–became the favorite of Nelson, and was appointed to the command of his flag-ship, serving with him, successively, in the “Vanguard”, the “Namur”, the “St. George”,...

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Letters Of Commodore Hardy

Since the foregoing pages were printed, my friend Professor D. C. Gilman, has brought to my notice the original letters of Commodore Hardy, to the inhabitants of Stonington and to General Isham, which are now in the Library of Yale College. The first (of August 9th) was copied with sufficient accuracy in the account published by the magistrates, warden and burgesses (page 25), I reprint it here, but with a facsimile of the signature. “His Britannic Majesty’s Ship”, PACTOLUS, “9th August, 1814. 1/2 past 5 o’clock, P. M.” Not wishing to destroy the unoffending Inhabitants residing in the Town of Stonington, one hour is granted them from the receipt of this to remove out of the town. [Illustration: (Hardy Signature)] “To the Inhabitants of the Town of Stonington.” The second, is in reply to the letter from the magistrates which was sent on board the “Ramillies”, by Col. Isaac Williams and Dr. William Lord, on Wednesday, the 10th. As “official etiquette” did net permit Col. Green to obtain “an exact copy,” he could only print its substance “as far as memory served” (see page 14). The magistrates allude to it, in their published account (p. 30), as “the singular communication received from Commodore Hardy, which preceded the fire on Thursday.” It is evident that the British commander was strangely in error as to the assurances and engagements which he...

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Biography of Drury Upshaw

DRURY UPSHAW (deceased). Among the early pioneers of Douglas County, Missouri, stands the name of Drury Upshaw, whose advent into this county dated from the year 1838. Earnestly and zealously he labored to subdue the wilderness and by persistent effort gathered around him many of the comforts and conveniences of life. He was a native of Tennessee and a son of Drury Upshaw, who was also a native of that State, and who passed his entire life there. In his native State our subject was married to Miss Frankie Parnue, a native of North Carolina. In 1812 he served in the war, and as before stated, came to this county in 1838, and took up Government land. His death occurred in 1846 and his widow followed him to the grave in 1861, her death occurring in Crawford County. Mr. Upshaw was at one time a Whig, but later espoused the principles of the Republican party, with which he remained until his death. He became well known all over the county and passed his entire life in tilling the soil. To his marriage were born nine children, as follows: John S.; William, who died in 1849; Essel, died in 1876; Le Roy died in 1876; David died in 1849; Cynthia, deceased, was the wife of William Garnar; Polly was the wife of James Patten; Rebecca was the wife of James...

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Biography of William Hartford, D. O.

William Hartford, D. O. The science of osteopathy, which has its fundamental principle in the theory that most diseases of humanity are traceable to malformation of some part of the skeleton, long since has passed the experimental stage and has become a widely recognized and sane factor in the alleviation of the suffering of mankind. A capable and enthusiastic promoter of this method of cure is found in Dr. William Hartford of Champaign, who has been engaged in practice here since 1899, and whose professional career has been one characterized by remarkably successful results. He is a native of Henderson County, Illinois, and was born December 6, 1856, a son of Winfield Scott and Lucetta Rebekah (Thomas) Hartford. The family history of Dr. Hartford is a decidedly interesting one. In 1579 Sir John Hartford, son of Thomas Hartford, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth for brave and honorable service rendered in the wars of that period, and was given a province, or manor, in southern Scotland. While he had been born in Northumberland County, England, after being given this manor he settled in Scotland, where the family resided until during the persecution of the Church of Scotland by the ruler of England, when the younger members of the family were driven into northern Ireland and became what is known as Scotch-Irish. About 1730 James and Patrick Hartford, descendants of Sir...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Gibson

Archibald Gibson, of Ireland, emigrated to America and settled in Virginia. He had a son named Joseph, who served in the war of 1812. Joseph married Susan Hudson, and settled in Lincoln County, Mo., in 1818. His children were Mary, Elizabeth, Archibald, Nancy, John, William, Patsy, Susan, Lucinda, and Malinda. Mr. Gibson was married the second time to the widow Caffer, whose maiden name was Matilda Wright: By her he had Rufus, Mary, Waller, Matilda, Martha, Richard, Emma, and Thomas J. Mr. Gibson died in Lincoln County in his 87th year. Archibald, Elizabeth, and John married and settled in Warren County. John married Sarah A. Wright. He was at a camp-meeting, once, where a woman near him took the jerks, and fell into his arms. Never having seen anything of the kind before, he was astonished and bewildered, and called out at the top of his voice, “Here, Preacher, your attention, pleases. Here’s a woman with a fit” But the “fit” soon left her, and he was relieved. Lucinda Gibson married Felix Kountz, and settled in St. Charles County. Martha married Mr. Patton, of Warren County. Malinda married Mr. Spencer, and settled in St. Charles...

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Biographical Sketch of Richard Wright

Richard Wright, of Culpepper County, Va., was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married Ann Smith, of Virginia, and settled in Warren County, Mo., in 1822. In 1858 he removed to Lincoln County, where he died. His children were Elizabeth, Henry C., Susannah, Ann M., George W., and Francis M. Elizabeth married Marion Ross, who settled in Lincoln County. Henry C. is a physician. He settled in Warren County, and when the North Missouri Railroad was built he laid off a town on his farm, and called it Wright City. The place now numbers some five or six hundred inhabitants, and is a thriving town. Dr. Wright represented his county in the Lower House of the Legislature two terms, and one term in the State Senate. He at present resides in St. Louis, and enjoys a comfortable fortune. Susanna H. Wright married Presley Ross, of Lincoln County. Ann married James Taylor, who died in California. George W. married Judith Carter, of St. Charles Co. Frank M. married Nancy Gizer, of Lincoln...

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Biographical Sketch of Jared Irvine

Jared Irvine was one of the early settlers of Warren County. He married Mary Peebles, and they had Eliza J., Louisa, and John. Mr. Irvine served as a soldier in the war of 1812, when he was only sixteen years of age. He was captured in one of the battles and taken to Canada, and after his exchange he walked from Canada to his home in Kentucky. He was a member of the first grand jury of Warren County, and was a leading and influential...

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Biographical Sketch of Hardin Camp

Hardin Camp, of South Carolina, was of English parentage. He served his country in two of its principal wars the revolution and the war of 1812. He married Sarah Hawkins, and settled in Warren Co., Ky. Their children were Josiah, Thomas, Hawkins, Joseph, Sarah, and Elizabeth. Thomas married Sarah Middleton, of Kentucky, and settled in Missouri in 1842. He died soon after, leaving a widow and nine children. Joseph married Nancy Shackelford, of Madison Co., Ky., and settled in Warren Co., Mo., in 1836. His children were Hiram H., Josiah, Mahala, Angeline, Sarah, Elizabeth, Martha, Judith A., and Mary. Mr. Camp had intended to settle in Howard, Co., Mo., but when he reached Jones’ farm, where Jonesburg now stands, his wagon mired down, and he concluded to stop there. So he bought land in the vicinity, and settled upon it. He was Judge of the County Court of Warren Co., Ky., before he left that...

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Biography of John Rogers

Among the pioneer builders who aided in laying the broad foundation upon which has been erected the present greatness and prosperity of the state of Oklahoma, representatives of the Rogers family have figured conspicuously and of a goodly portion of this family John Rogers, the great-grandfather of Mrs. Ellen Howard Miller, nee Blythe, was the head. His father was a native of England and served as a colonel in the Revolutionary war. He married Sarah Cordery, whose mother was a Cherokee. Her father, Thomas Cordery, was a member of a family that belonged to the aristocracy of France, but for political reasons they made their home in England. When about sixteen years of age Thomas Cordery was sent by his father on a sea voyage to the colonies, for the benefit of his health. In company with two sisters and a brother, he sailed for America and finally landed at St. Augustine, Florida. This was undoubtedly during the seventeenth century, for on leaving the vessel at St. Augustine the first object which attracted their attention was the guillotine a ghastly reminder of Spanish rule in this part of the new world. The sisters and brother made their home in Florida and Thomas Cordery spent his time in hunting. Eventually he started out upon a trip of this kind, but never returned and many years later, during the Seminole war,...

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