Topic: War of 1812

Biographical Sketch of James Witcher

James Witcher, of Virginia, married Martha Watson, and they had three sons and three daughters. Ephraim, their eldest son, who was a soldier in the war of 1812, settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., and married Winifred B. Holley, by whom he had six children. He died in 1845, and his widow married Col. Reuben Pew, who also died, leaving her a widow the second...

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Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had only one principal street, and most of the houses were made of square posts set upright, with the spaces between filled with straw and mud, the chimneys being built of the same material. The court house was surrounded by a post-and-rail fence, and young Davis was sitting on this fence when the announcement was made that the Territory of Missouri had become a State. From St. Louis Mr. Davis went to Pike County, and settled in Clarksville, where he lived forty-six years. In those days rattlesnakes were much more abundant than they are now, and the old pioneers would occasionally go on “snaking” frolics. They always came back vomiting from the effects of the poisonous smell of the snakes. On one occasion Mr. Davis and his neighbors went to...

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Biographical Sketch of Cole Diggs

Cole Diggs was born February 25, 1791. He served as a soldier in the war of 1812, and in 1817 he settled in Kentucky, and married Jane Pace, a daughter of Rev. John Pace, of Virginia. In 1832 he removed to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where he still resides (1875), in the 85th year of his age. He kept hotel at Danville, for some time after he came to Missouri, and served as Justice of the Peace for many...

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Biographical Sketch of James Glenn

James Glenn and his wife, Sarah Grigg, with their two children, James and Nellie, came from Ireland to America, and settled in Virginia. After their settlement there the following children were born Polly, William, Thomas, and Whitehill. Mr. Glenn and his three sons, William, Thomas, and Whitehill, moved to Ohio; the rest of the children married and settled in Kentucky. James, William, and Thomas were in the war of 1812, and the former was killed at the battle of New Orleans. The other two were with the armies that operated in Canada and the northern part of the United States. After the war Thomas married Lucinda T. Kendall, of Kentucky, and came to Missouri in 1815. He came in a wagon, which contained, in addition to his family and furniture, a set of wheel-wright’s tools, a gun and a dog. Mr. Glenn settled first on Cuivre River, but made about twenty settlements in all before he could find a location to suit him. These were all within the present limits of Montgomery County. He was a great hunter, and during the first year of his residence in Missouri killed fifty-six deer, one elk, and one bear. The names of his children were Julia A , Emily H., Sarah E., James M., and William...

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Haslip

Robert Haslip was a native of Maryland, but settled and lived in Virginia. He had two sons, Samuel and John. The latter was a soldier in the war of 1812. He married Lucy Johnson, by whom he had Robert, James N., Samuel, John, William, Malinda, Jane, Elizabeth, and Polly. James N. settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1838. His wife was Esther Clements, by whom he had ten children. Robert, brother of James, settled in Lincoln County in 1837, and in 1860 he was killed by a wagon running over his...

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Biographical Sketch of Alexander Harding

Alexander Harding, of Halifax Co., Va., married Mary Hightower, and they had Archibald, Anna, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Mary, and Sally. Mr. Harding died in 1816, and his widow married Josiah Rodgers, and moved to Alabama. Archibald married in Virginia, and settled in Missouri in 1833. Anna married James Anderson, and settled in Montgomery County in 1833. Benjamin served in the war of 1812. He married Mary Nunnelly, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery County in 1831. They had but one child, who died when nineteen years of...

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Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on...

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Biographical Sketch of Jesse Henton

Jesse Henton of Logan Co., Ky., was in the war of 181.2. He married Sarah Hughes, of Kentucky, and settled in Pike Co., Mo., in 1827, His children were John, James L., William, David, Wesley S., Rolla W., Mary J., Benjamin, Sarah A., Elizabeth E., and Harriet D. Rolla W. married Elizabeth L. Jamison, of Pike County, and settled in Montgomery. Samuel, son of John Henton, settled in Pike County in 1826. He married Mary Estens, and subsequently settled in Montgomery...

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Biography of Victor Craig

Victor Craig, of England, came to America in 1760, and settled in Maryland. He had four sons, William, James, Robert, and Samuel. William and James lived in Albemarle County Va. Samuel was drowned in the Susquehanna River. Robert was a soldier of the revolutionary war. He was married first to Susan Carter, of Virginia, who was afterward killed by the Indians. She lived nine days after having been scalped. Mr. Craig was married the second time to Sarah Ellington, of New Jersey, by whom he had-John, David, Victor, Jonathan, Jacob, Cynthia, Nancy, and Sally. Mr. Craig settled in Montgomery County in 1829, and died the following year. His eldest son, John, married Nancy Cobb, and settled in Montgomery County in 1826. He was a blacksmith by trade, and the first one at Danville. In 1831 he built the Dryden horse-mill, on the Booneslick road, below Danville. The mill was run by a cog wheel, and it required three or four hours to grind a bushel of grain. The hermit, Baughman, whose history is given elsewhere, carried the stones of this mill to his cave, many years after the mill ceased running, and arranged them so he could do his own grinding, by hand. He still uses the same stones. Col. David Craig, brother of John, settled in Montgomery County in 1817, and is still living, in his 87th year....

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Biographical Sketch of Edwin Beard

Edwin Beard and his wife, Mary Bell, of Ireland, came to America and settled in Augusta Co., Va. They had William, John, David, Charles, and Samuel. The latter was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was present at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. He married Sarah Craig, of Staunton, Va., and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Kentucky in 1792, and to Missouri in 1827. His children were John, William, David, Samuel, Absalom, James, Mary B., Sarah L., and Elizabeth. William was a soldier in the war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison. He married Elizabeth Finley, of Lincoln Co., Ky., and settled in Missouri in 1830. David married Mary DeJarnette, and settled in Missouri in 1827. Samuel married Rebecca Fisher, and settled in Ohio. Absalom died unmarried, in New Orleans. James was married first to Mary J. Logan, and second to Martha A. Briggs, and settled in Missouri. Mary married Gabriel Reeds, of Kentucky, and settled in Lincoln Co., Mo., in 1830. Sarah was married first to William C. Finley, and after his death she removed to Lincoln Co., Mo., where she married McKenly Hays. She died, and Hays married her sister...

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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Berger

Jacob Berger, of Germany, came to America and settled first in Pennsylvania, but subsequently removed and settled in Pittsylvania Co., Va. His sons were William, Jacob, George, and John; and he had several daughters whose names we could not obtain. William was killed in the war of 1812, having volunteered to serve in place of his brother George, who had been drafted, and who, being a married man, could not leave his family. George married Mary Boatright, of Virginia, by whom he had Thomas A., Jacob, Louisa J., Lucy A., William J., Appalana F., Polly, David, Elizabeth, and Marialmnel. Jacob and Polly died young, in Virginia. The rest of the children came with their parents to Missouri in 1838, and settled in Montgomery County. Thomas married Ellen Stone, of Virginia. Louisa married Pleasant Davis, of Missouri. Lucy married Buckner Jefferson, of Missouri. Appalana married Erasmus McGinnis, of Missouri. Elizabeth married William...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter Carter

Peter Carter, of Kentucky, had twelve children. Larkin G., one of his sons, married Judith Jones, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1819. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, under General Harrison, and acted as Colonel of militia in Montgomery County for several years. He died in 1847, having raised thirteen...

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Biographical Sketch of Daniel Morrow

Daniel Morrow, a soldier of the war of 1812, married Fanny Hall, and settled in South Carolina, but afterward removed to Tennessee. Their children were John, Fanny, Sarah, and Elizabeth. John married Sarah Hail, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1816. They had William, Bethel C., John H., David P., James A., Washington J., Lucinda, Elizabeth, and Sarah...

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Record Of The Extraordinary Attack On Stonington

NEW LONDON, AUGUST 17, 1814. On Tuesday the 9th instant, at 5 P. M. the “Ramilies”, 74, “Pactolus”, 38, a bomb ship, and the “Dispatch”, 22 gun brig, arrived off Stonington, and a flag was sent on shore with the following note– “”On board his Majesty’s Ship, Ramilies, Stonington, Aug. 9.” TO THE MAGISTRATES OF STONINGTON. Gentlemen–One hour is allowed you from the receipt of this communication, for the removal of the unoffending inhabitants. THOMAS M. HARDY.[2] This notification was received by two magistrates[3] and Lieutenant Hough of the drafted militia, who went off to meet the flag. The officer was asked whether a flag would not be received on board. He said no arrangements could be made. They inquired whether Com. Hardy had determined to destroy the town. He replied that such were his orders from the Admiral, and that it would be done most effectually. When the gentlemen reached the shore, a crowd waited with great anxiety for the news; which being stated, consternation flew through the town. An express was despatched to General Cushing,[4] at New London. A number of volunteers hastened to collect ammunition; others ran to the battery, which consisted of two 18 pounders and a 4 pounder, on field carriages, with a slight breast work, 4 feet high. The sick and the aged were removed with haste: the women and children, with loud...

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Names Of Volunteers, From The Connecticut Gazette

[From the Conn. Gazette, Aug. 24th.] The following is handed us as a list of the volunteers (tho’ presumed not entirely perfect,) of those who so bravely stood the brunt of the attack of Stonington Point:– Of “Stonington”:– Capt. George Fellows, Gurdon Trumbull, Capt. Wm. Potter, Alexexander G. Smith, Dr. William Lord, Amos Denison jun., Lieut H. G. Lewis, Stanton Gallup, Ensign D. Frink, Ebenezer Morgan, John Miner. Of “Mystic”:– Jesse Deane, Jeremiah Holmes, Deane Gallup, N. Cleft, Frederick Haley, Jedediah Reed. Of “Groton”:– Alfred White, Frank Daniels, Ebenezer Morgan, Giles Moran. Of “New London”:– Major Simeon Smith, Capt. Noah Lester (formerly of the Army), Major N. Frink, Lambert Williams. From “Massachusetts”:– Capt. Leonard, Mr. Dunham. [From the Conn. Gazette, Aug. 31st.] By an error of the compositor, the following names were omitted in the list published in our last paper, of volunteers who so greatly contributed to the glorious defence and preservation of Stonington, viz.:– Simeon Haley, Thomas Wilcox, Jeremiah Haley, Luke Palmer, Frederick Denison, George Palmer, John Miner, William G. Bush, Asa Lee. There were probably others, whom we have not...

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