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Topic: Timucua

Middle Slave Raid Period 1684-1706

Stark changes occurred during the mid-1680s in the Southeast. There were many movements of population as the intensity of attacks on the Spanish mission by the Westo, Chickmawka’s, Yamassee and pirates intensified. The Rickohockens were completely pushed out of their stronghold at the Peaks of the Twin Otter by Iroquois raids. The Iroquois had obtained firearms first from the Dutch, and now from the English. Many minor ethnic groups and villages in the Carolina’s had disappeared during the previous twenty years due to Rickohocken and Westo slave raids. Now African slaves were much more available, so the emphasis of the Native American slave raids shifted to the capture of youth to trade on the docks in Charleston, Port Royal and Georgetown for African slaves. The ratio was four Indians for one African. The American Indian slaves rarely lived past two harvest seasons on the sugar plantations of the Caribbean. They were so cheap as to be considered expendable. Basically, they were fed as little as possible, then worked to death. Many Southeastern indigenous tribes today think of themselves as pure descendants of ancient peoples – perhaps with a tad of European or African blood mixed in <chuckle>. However, it is clear from looking at the maps and reading the archives of the late 1600s, that Native American communities had become locations where remnant peoples assimilated. Somewhere between 90 and...

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Timucua Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. Apohola (buzzard). A Timucua phratry which included the Nuculaha, Nuculahaqus, Nuculaharuqui, Chorofa, Usinaca, Ayahanisino, Napoya, Amacahuri, Hauenayo, and Amusaya clans. They were prohibited from marrying among themselves. Pareja (ca. 1612) quoted by Gatschet in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc., xvii, 492, 1878. Arahasomi (‘bear gens’, from ara ‘black bear’, hasomi ‘family’). A Timucua clan of the Chulufichi phratry. Pareja (ca. 1612) quoted by Gatschet in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc., xvii, 492, 1878. Ayahanisino. A clan of the Apohola phratry of the Timucua. Pareja (ca. 1612) quoted by Gatschet in Am. Philos. Soc. Proc., xvii, 492, 1878. Cayahasomi. The Partridge clan of the Acheha phratry of the ancient Timucua tribe of Florida. Chehelu. A clan of the Acheha phratry of the ancient Timucua in Florida. Pareja (ca. 1612) quoted by Gatschet in Am. Philos. Soc. Proc., 492, 1878. Chorofa (bird). A clan of the Apohola phratry of the ancient Timucua of Florida. Pareja (1614) quoted by Gatschet in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc., xviii, 492, 1878. Chulufichi. A phratry of the ancient Timucua of Florida. Its clans were Arahasomi, Habachaca, and several others not recorded. Pareja (1614) quoted by Gaschet in Proc. Am. Philos. Soc., xvii, 492, 1878. Cuyuhasomi (‘fish...

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