Topic: Spanish-American War

Rough Rider Search Instructions for NARA

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained. These materials are held by the Old Military and Civilian Records (Washington, DC). Search Hint: To retrieve the 1,235 digitized documents: Go to http://www.archives.gov/research/arc/. Press the Yellow search button to go to the Basic search screen. Enter Spanish American War and volunteer in the Keywords box. (To search for a specific person, add their first name and last name to the Keywords box. For example, enter Spanish American War and volunteer and Theodore Roosevelt in the Keywords box.) Select the limit results radio button for 2000. Select the box marked Descriptions of Archival Materials linked to digital copies. Press the Go button. When hits are returned for your search, view the full result of your hit by selecting the Title...

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Recruitment for the 9th and 10 Cavalry

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The image of Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders charging up San Juan Hill is ingrained in the minds of most Americans. Those men of the 9th and 10th Cavalry alongside Roosevelt are not so prominent. They not only were with him, but they played an important role in the battle. There are official and unofficial reports of the battle in Record Group 391, US Regular Army Mobile Units, 1821-1942. Among the Letters and Endorsements Sent, 1896-99, is a handwritten account of the 9th Cavalry in...

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1st North Dakota Volunteers

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now John Durand has written a fascinating account of a little remembered event at the very beginning of America’s entry onto the world stage as an imperial power: the struggle to subdue and annex the Philippines. These days if anyone remembers the Spanish American War it is probably with images of Teddy Roosevelt and his Rough Riders, yellow journalism, the island of Cuba, and the slogan Remember the Maine, to Hell with Spain. But that was Cuba. The war in the Philippines was far bloodier, it lasted far longer, and it created tensions and legacies that continue to affect American foreign policy to this day. Durand s The Boys: 1st North Dakota Volunteers in the Philippines recounts the experiences of a group of men, mostly young, who volunteered to avenge the sinking of the battleship Maine by joining a quickly assembled regiment of North Dakotans. From the first day of enlistments until the last man was mustered out of federal service, the roster of the 1st North Dakota Volunteers changed constantly. New men joined the regiment, others resigned, transferred to different units, or were discharged. And some died. According to official sources the regiment mustered in 685 men May 13-16, 1898 at Fargo. When they were mustered out in San Francisco September 25, 1899, the Army’s Adjutant...

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Spanish American War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States. Revolts against Spanish rule had been endemic for decades in Cuba and were closely watched by Americans; there had been war scares before, as in the Virginius Affair in 1873. By 1897–98 American public opinion grew more angry at reports of Spanish atrocities, magnified by the “yellow journalism”. After the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine in Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the government headed by President William McKinley, a Republican, into a war McKinley had wished to avoid. Compromise proved impossible and first Madrid, then Washington, formally declared war. Although the main issue was Cuban independence, the ten-week war was fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. A series of one-sided American naval and military victories followed on all fronts, owing to their numerical superiority in most of the battles and despite the good performance of some of the Spanish infantry units. The outcome was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, which was favorable to the U.S. followed by temporary American control of Cuba and indefinite colonial authority over Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippines. The defeat and subsequent end of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock for Spain’s national psyche. The victor gained several...

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Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

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Biography of Colonel Edward Kittilsen

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The soldier-sheriff of Rock Island County needs no introduction to that county’s people. That he is well and favorably known is evidenced by the office with which they have honored him, and which he now holds and fills so acceptably. Edward Kittilsen was born in Moline, July 19, 1854, his parents being Andrew and Frederika (Johnson) Kittilsen. His father was a native of Norway and his mother of Sweden. Their son received a public school education in Moline, and upon its completion he entered the business college conducted by Mr. Frey in Rock Island. After pursuing a commercial course in this institution he served as clerk in a grocery store for a time, and later learned the molder’s trade. At twenty years of age he engaged in the ice business, and in that enterprise he was prosperous and successful until the spring of 1880, when his winter’s harvest of ice, and his ice house as well, were destroyed by the overflowing of the Mississippi, bringing to him a severe loss. In that same year he was appointed upon the Moline police force, and two years later rose to the rank of deputy marshal, and in 1883 was appointed chief of police, which office he held continuously for more than twenty-three years, or until he resigned to...

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Troup County Georgia in the Spanish American War

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Spanish American War. The last straw in the friction between Spain and the United States was the sinking of the Maine in Havana harbor on February 15, 1898. After the court of inquiry had determined that the explosion was due to a mine in the harbor, the United States Congress demanded the withdrawal of the Spanish troops from Cuba, which was practically a declaration of war. This occurred on April 20, 1898, and was followed by a call for troops on April 22, 1898, from eighteen to forty-five years of age. The Fifth Regiment of Georgia Volunteers under the command of Colonel John S. Candler, Lieutenant-Colonel Park Woodward, Majors W. J. Kendrick, Cleveland Wilcoxon and Clifford L. Smith, were called to Atlanta immediately and the regiment through its commanders and company officers volunteered for service in the above war. The LaGrange Light Guards under the command of William T. Herring was Company E of this regiment. The regiment was not accepted as a unit, but many of the officers were selected to form the Second Georgia Regiment. Enlistment was made voluntary in the new organization. The Second Georgia was considered as a reserve and was encamped near Tampa, Florida; but the Fifth Regiment of regulars was then stationed at Fort McPherson and was sent to the...

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