Topic: Shoshoni

Treaty of July 2, 1863

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of Agreement made at Fort Bridger, in Utah Territory, this second day of July, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, by and between the United States of America, represented by its Commissioners, and the Shoshone nation of Indians, represented by its Chiefs and Principal Men And Warriors of the Eastern Bands, as follows: Article 1.Friendly and amicably relations are hereby re-established between the bands of the Shoshonee nation, parties hereto, and the United States; and it is declared that a firm and perpetual peace shall be henceforth maintained between the Shoshonee nation and the United States. Article 2.The several routes of travel through the Shoshonee country, now or hereafter used by white men, shall be and remain forever free and safe for the use of the government of the United States, and of all emigrants and travelers under its authority and Protection, without molestation or injury from any of the people of the said nation. And if depredations should at any time be committed by bad men of their nation, the offenders shall be immediately seized and delivered up to the proper officers of the United States, to be punished as their offences shall deserve; and the safety of all travelers passing peaceably over said routes is hereby guaranteed by said nation. Military...

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Treaty of July 30, 1863

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement made at Box Elder, in Utah Territory, this thirtieth day of July, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, by and between the United States of America, represented by Brigadier-General P. Edward Connor, commanding the military district of Utah, and James Duane Doty, commissioner, and the northwestern bands of the Shoshonee Indians, represented by their chiefs and warriors: Article I.It is agreed that friendly and amicable relations shall be re-established between the bands of the Shoshonee Nation, parties hereto, and the United States, and it is declared that a firm and perpetual peace shall be henceforth maintained between the said bands and the United States. Article II.The treaty concluded at Fort Bridger on the 2nd day of July, 1863; between the United States and the Shoshonee Nation, being read and fully interpreted and explained to the said chiefs and warriors, they do hereby give their full and free assent to all of the provisions of said treaty, and the same are hereby adopted as a part of this agreement, and the same shall be binding upon the parties hereto. Article III.In consideration of the stipulations in the preceding articles, the United States agree to increase the annuity to the Shoshonee Nation five thousand dollars, to be paid in the manner provided in...

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Treaty of October 12, 1863

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaty of peace and friendship made at Tuilla Valley, in the Territory of Utah, this twelfth day of October, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, between the United States of America, represented by the undersigned commissioners, and the Shoshonee-Goship bands of Indians, represented by their chiefs, principal men, and warriors, as follows: Article I.Peace and friendship is hereby established and shall be hereafter maintained between the Shoshonee-Goship bands of Indians and the citizens and Government of the United States; and the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States, within their country, shall cease. Article II.It is further stipulated by said bands that the several routes of travel through their country now or hereafter used by white men shall be forever free and unobstructed by them, for the use of the Government of the United States, and of all emigrants and travelers within it under its authority and protection, without molestation or injury from them. And if depredations are at any time committed by bad men of their own or other tribes within their country, the offenders shall be immediately taken and delivered up to the proper officers of the United States, to be punished...

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Treaty of October 1, 1863

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Treaty of Peace and Friendship made at Ruby Valley, in the Territory of Nevada, this first day of October, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, between the United States of America, represented by the undersigned commissioners, and the Western Bands of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians, represented by their Chiefs and Principal Men and Warriors, as follows: Article I.Peace and friendship shall be hereafter established and maintained between the Western Bands of the Shoshonee nation and the people and Government of the United States; and the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States within their country, shall cease. Article II.The several routes of travel through the Shoshonee country, now or hereafter used by white men, shall be forever free, and unobstructed by the said bands, for the use of the government of the United States, and of all emigrants and travelers under its authority and protection, without molestation or injury from them. And if depredations are at any time committed by bad men of their nation, the offenders shall be immediately taken and delivered up to the proper officers of the United States, to be punished as their offences shall deserve; and the safety...

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Washakie, A Shoshone Chief, The Friend Of The White Man

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The Shoshone Indians lived long ago in the Rocky Mountains, but they have gradually moved westward until now they live on the western side, where there are two wonderful springs which send water eastward and westward to flow into our two great oceans. The water from one flows through the Yellowstone Park to the Missouri River, the cascades, flows smoothly for one hundred and fifty miles till it reaches the Pacific Ocean. Because these Indians live long the banks of the winding Snake River, they are sometimes called “Snakes,” but Shoshone is their Indian name. As long ago as 1636 Washington Irving tells us that Captain Bonneville met Shoshone Indians on his way to the Pacific Coast. Even then the chiefs came together, smoked the peace pipe, burying their tomahawks and made up their minds to be good, peaceable Indians. A tribe of Indians usually takes its character from the head chief. If he is a man who cares for his people, thinks for them, and leads them, then they follow and do what he says. Washakie was such a chief, and his people loved and followed him. He had a large country, four hundred miles square, called the wind River Reservation, and here he grouped his Indians in small villages about a beautiful spring of...

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Snake Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Snake Indians. A name applied to many different bodies of Shoshonean Indians but most persistently to those of eastern Oregon, to which the following synonyms refer.  These Indians form one dialectic group with the Paviotso of west Nevada and the Mono of south east California.  The principal Snake tribes were on the Walpapi and...

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Kawia Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now History shows us that there are two distinct tribes which were attributed the name of Kawia by etymologists. The larger tribe is one of the Shoshonean stock, while the smaller, extinct tribe is a Yokuts tribe. Both of them resided in California, further confusing historians. Kawia Indians – Shoshonean The name, of uncertain derivation, of a Shoshonean division in southern California, affiliated linguistically with the Aguas Calientes, Juaneños, and Luiseños. They inhabit the north tongue of the Colorado desert from Banning south east at least as far as Salton, as also the headwaters of Santa Margarita river, where the Kawia Reservation is situated. Formerly they are said to have extended into San Bernardino valley, but it seems more likely that this was occupied, as at present, by the Serranos. They are not to be confounded with a Yokuts tribe bearing the same name. They were first visited in 1776 by Fray Francisco Garcés, who referred to them under their Mohave name, “Jecuich,” obtained from his guide. At this time they lived about the north slopes of the San Jacinto Mouintains and to the northward, and roamed east to the Colorado, but their principal seat was about San Gorgonio pass. Burton 1Burton H. R. Ex. Doc. 76, 34th Cong., 3d sess., 115,1857 gave 3,500 as the number...

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Shoshoni Indian Chiefs and Leaders

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Washakie’s Band The easternmost division of the Shoshoni proper, so called from their chief. They formerly ranged from Wind river in lat. 43° 30′ on the north, in Wyoming, and from South pass to the headwaters of the North Platte on the east, and to Bear river near the mouth of Smith fork, in Idaho, on the west. On the south they extended as far as Brown’s hole, on Green river, Wyo. They are known officially as Shoshoni in distinction front the Bannock, Sheepeaters, etc., and...

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Shoshoni Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Shoshoni Indians. The most northerly division of the Shoshonean family. They formerly occupied west Wyoming, meeting the Ute on the south, the entire central and southern parts of Idaho, except the territory taken by the Bannock, north east Nevada, and a small strip of Utah west of Great Salt lake. The Snake River country in Idaho is, perhaps, to be considered their stronghold. The northern bands were found by Lewis and Clark in 1805, on the headwaters of the Missouri in west Montana, but they had ranged previously farther east on the plains, whence they had been driven into the Rocky Mountains by the hostile Atsina and Siksika, who already possessed firearms. Nowhere had the Shoshoni established themselves on the Columbia, although they reached that river on their raiding excursions. The origin of the term Shoshoni appears to be unknown. It apparently is not a Shoshoni word, and although the name is recognized by the Shoshoni as applying to themselves, it probably originated among some other tribe. The Cheyenne name for the Comanche, who speak the Shoshoni language, is Shǐshǐnoats-hitäneo, ‘snake people’; but they have a different name for the Shoshoni. The term Snake seems to have no etymological connection with the designation Shoshoni. It has been variously and frequently applied to the northern bands of...

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Luiseno Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Luiseño Indians. The southernmost Shoshonean division in California, which received its name from San Luis Rey, the most important Spanish mission in the territory of these people. They form one linguistic group with the Aguas Calientes, Juaneños, and Kawia. They extended along the coast from between San Onofre and Las Animas creeks, far enough south to include Aguas Hedionda, San Marcos, Escondido, and Valley Center. Inland they extended north beyond San Jacinto river, and into Temescal creek; but they were cut off from the San Jacinto divide by the Diegueños, Aguas Calientes, Kawia, and Serranos. The former inhabitants of San Clemente Island also are said to have been Luiseños, and the same was possibly the case with those of San Nicolas Island. Their population was given in 1856 1Ind. Aff. Rep., 243 as between 2,500 and 2,800; in 1870, as 1,299; in 1885, as 1,142. Most of them were subsequently placed on small reservations included under the Mission Tule River agency, and no separate tribal count has been made. Their villages, past and present, are: Ahuanga Apeche Bruno’s Village La Joya Las Flores Pala Pauma Pedro’s Village (?) Potrero Rincon Saboba San Luis Rey (mission) Santa Margarita (?) Temecula Wahoma Taylor 2Taylor, Cal. Farmer, May 11, 1860 gives the following list of villages in the neighborhood...

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Bannock Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Bannock Indians (from Panátǐ, their own name). A Shoshonean tribe whose habitat previous to being gathered on reservations can not be definitely outlined. There were two geographic divisions, but references to the Bannock do not always note this distinction. The home of the chief division appears to have been south east Idaho, whence they ranged into west Wyoming. The country actually claimed by the chief of this southern division, which seems to have been recognized by the treaty of Ft Bridger, July 3, 1868, lay between lat. 42° and 45°, and between long. 113° and the main chain of the Rocky Mountains. It separated the Wihinasht Shoshoni of west Idaho from the so-called Washaki band of Shoshoni of west Wyoming. They were found in this region in 1859, and they asserted that this had been their home in the past. Bridger 1Bridger, Ind. Aft. Rep., 363, 1859 had known them in this region as early as 1829. Bonneville found them in 1833 on Portneuf River, immediately north of the present Ft Hall reservation. Many of this division affiliated with the Washaki Shoshoni, and by 1859 had extensively intermarried with them. Bridger states that when he first knew them (about 1829) the southern Bannock numbered 1,200 lodges, indicating a population of about 8,000. In 1869 they were...

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Chemehuevi Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Chemehuevi Indians. A Shoshonean tribe, apparently an offshoot of the Paiute, formerly inhabiting the east bank of the Rio Colorado from Bill Williams fork to the Needles and extending westward as far as Providence Mountains, California, their chief seat being Chemehuevi valley, which stretches for 5 miles along the Colorado and nearly as far on either side. When or how they acquired possession of what appears to have been Yuman territory is not known. They may possibly have been seen by Alarcon, who navigated the Rio Colorado in 1540; but if so, they are not mentioned by name. Probably the first reference to the Chemehuevi is by Fray Francisco Garcés, who passed through their country in journeying from the Yuma to the Mohave, and again from lower Kern River to the latter tribe on his way to the pueblo of Oraibi in north east Arizona in 1775-76. Among the  Indians whom Garcés saw, or of whom heard, are the Chelemegué, Chemegué, Cuajála, Chemegué, Sevinta, and Chemeguaba, the first and last mentioned being apparently the Chemehuevi, while the others are the Virgin River Paiute and Shivwits, respectively, “Chemegué” here being used somewhat in the sense  of denoting Shoshonean affinity. In passing down the Colorado from the Mohave rancherias Garcés does not mention any Chemehuevi or other Indians...

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Comanche Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Comanche Indians. One of the southern tribes of the Shoshonean stock, and the only one of that group living entirely on the plains. Their language and traditions show that they are a comparatively recent offshoot from the Shoshoni of Wyoming, both tribes speaking practically the same dialect and, until very recently, keeping up constant and friendly communication. Within the traditionary period the two tribes lived adjacent to each other in south Wyoming, since which time the Shoshoni have been beaten back into the mountains by the Sioux and other prairie tribes, while the Comanche have been driven steadily southward by the same pressure. In this southerly migration the Penateka seem to have preceded the rest of the tribe. The Kiowa say that when they themselves moved southward from the Black hills region, the Arkansas was the north boundary of the Comanche. In 1719 the Comanche are mentioned under their Siouan name of Padouca as living in what now is west Kansas. It must he remembered that from 500 to 800 miles was an ordinary range for a prairie tribe and that the Comanche were equally at home on the Platte and in the Bolson de Mapimi of Chihuahua. As late as 1805 the North Platte was still known as Padouca fork. At that time they roamed...

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