Topic: Shetimasha

The Shetimasha Language

Although my chief purpose in going south was to study the Shetimasha language, I cannot give here a full account of it, for it would fill not less than one hundred pages. This language, of which no other dialects are known to exist now, is vocalic, and nasalizes its vowels to a small degree only. It has a profusion of declensional and conjugational endings, suffixes the personal pronouns to the finite verb, forms a passive voice, and seems to be extremely polysynthetic as far as derivation by suffixes is concerned. Ternary and quaternary compounds are not uncommon. The numerals show the decimal system of numeration, not the quinary one, which is the most common in the Indian languages spoken within the United States. For the pronoun thou they have one form to address common people, and another reverential one to address superiors, etc. Something of the kind is found also in the southern dialects of the Dakota family, as Ponka and Omaha. I will present here a list of derivatives added to the words of which they form compounds. This list is very instructive for showing the mental processes which these Indians have followed in forming their ideas—the concrete as well as the abstract ones. akstegi′, (1), purchased, bought; (2), wretched, miserable. Quite similar is the connection traceable between Ital. cattivo, French, che′tif, which mean miserable, but formerly meant...

Read More

Shetimasha Tribe

The wide area of Louisiana was once the home of a large number of Indian tribes, whose names and locations are mentioned by the historians of the early colonies. These Indians were distinct from each other in language as well as in race, and if an investigator, of scientific attainments, had visited all of them 150 years ago, he would have probably discovered over forty dialects, belonging to at least eight linguistic families. Unfortunately, such a work was not undertaken at a time when it was possible to perform it, and all that we can do now is to collect the last remnants of a world of speech. Even these are not free from foreign admixtures, and, as far as race is concerned, the majority of Louisiana Indians are no longer of pure blood. The Shetimasha Indians, often in deadly conflict with the Chá′hta tribes, are distinct from other Indians in language and in some racial peculiarities. The banks of Grand Lake (formerly also Lake of the Shetimasha) and Grand river, or Bayou Atchafalaya (called She′ti, Tche′ti, in their language) seem to have been their earliest known habitat. Some sixteen or eighteen of these Indians still remain on Grand river and claim to own lands on it; but the majority of the tribe, about thirty-five persons, live at Charenton, a village on the southern bank of Bayou Tѐche, St....

Read More

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 7,468 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 7,468 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest