Topic: Seneca

Line of David Abeel

David Abeel, Patriot of the Revolution, eldest son of Capt. David and Mary (Duyckinck) Abeel, was born in Albany, 1727. He married July 2, 1752, Neiltje, daughter of Garret Van Bergen and Annatje Meyer. He settled in Catskill as early as 1754. In 1771 he obtained a patent for one thousand acres of land “on the west side of and adjoining the brook called the Caterskill, at a place called the Bak-Oven.” This estate was within the bounds of the Catskill Patent, and was formerly owned by Abeel’s father-in-law. They had issue: Annatie, born in Albany, March, 1753; died in infancy. Anthony, born in Catskill, Oct. 9, 1754; died Feb. 25, 1822; married Oct 6, 1797, Catharine Moon. Garret. See further. Annatje, born April 8, 1760; married Jacobus B. Hasbrouck. Catharine, born in Catskill, Sept. 28, 1765; died Aug. 24, 1829.  During the War of the Revolution there were living at the Bak-Oven, David Abeel, Neiltje, his wife, and their four children: Anthony, Gerrit, Catharine, Anna. The men of the household were zealous patriots, and between them and the few Tories in the neighborhood a bitter feud existed. One of these Tories, Jacobus Rowe, was especially malignant. He harbored the Indians when they came into the valley of the Catskill, and guided the Indians in their depredations throughout that neighborhood. On a Sunday evening in 1780, a party of Indians with Jacobus Rowe...

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Descendants of Johannes Abeel

Johannes Abeel Eldest son of Christopher Janse (Croom) Abeel, was born in Albany, March 23, 1667, died Jan. 28, 1711. He was a prosperous merchant, and was elected mayor of Albany, 1694-5. He removed to New Amsterdam and lived there for a time and on his return to Albany was elected a member of the Assembly in 1701; and in 1709 was again elected mayor of Albany. He married April 10, 1694, Catharine, daughter of David Schuyler, who, with his brother Pieterse, came from Amsterdam in 1650, and settled at Fort Orange. David Schuyler, the younger of the two, married Oct. 13, 1657, Callyntje, daughter of Abraham Isaacsen Ver Planck, the owner of Paulus Hook, now Jersey City. Johannes Abeel, by his wife Catharine (Schuyler) Abeel, had issue: Cataline, bap. New York, Oct. 23, 1691 Neiltje, bap. Albany, April 14, 1698 Christoffel, bap. Dec. 16, 1696 David, bap. April 29, 1705 Jannette, bap. at Albany, June 6, 1705 A copy of the inventory of his goods and personal estate includes a painted picture of himself; also one of his wife and daughter. Christoffel Abeel Son of Johannes and Catalina (Schuyler) Abeel (elder brother of David), was bap. at Albany, Dec. 16, 1696. He married Sept. 23, 1720, Margueritta Breese, Issue: Johannes (John). See further. Anthony Breese, bap. April 11, 1725; David, bap. Aug. 13, 1727 (settled at Bak-Oven, near...

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Abeel and Allied Families

Recent discoveries relating to the Abeel family, of which little has hitherto been known, have brought to light certain facts which have an important bearing on the Revolutionary period of our country’s history. The Genealogy of the Williamson and Abeel families, compiled by James A.Williamson, proves conclusively that the famous “Cornplanter” of the Seneca Tribe of the Six Nations was a direct descendant of Christopher Janse Abeel, the founder of this old Holland family in America. The faithful mother, who so carefully provided for her son’s welfare, little dreamed of the influence that would be exerted by him and...

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Seneca Council House, Letchworth Park, New York

Inscription: This ancient Seneca Council House stood at Ga-o-ya-de-a ‘Where the Heavens Rest Upon the Earth’ on the Genesee River in days antedating the American Revolution. In it gathered the war parties ‘that fought in the defense of their country.’ Before it prisoners ran the gauntlet. Around its council fires sat famous warriors and chiefs. It was rededicated Oct. 1, 1872 by the last Indian Council of the Genesee.” At this council Ga-yeh-twa-geh ‘Nicholson Parker’ gave the opening address which was as follows: “Brothers: I will say a few words. We have come here as representatives of the Seneca Nation to participate in the ceremonies of the day. In this ancient Council House, before its removal to this spot, our fathers, sachems and chiefs, often met to deliberate on matters of the moment to our people in the Village of Ga-o-yah-de-o ‘Caneadea’. We are here to rake over the ashes of its hearth, that we may find perchance a single spark with which to rekindle the fire, and cause the smoke again to rise above this roof, as in days that are past. The smoke is curling upward and the memories of the past are enwreathed with it. Brothers: When the Confederacy of the Iroquois was formed, a smoke was raised which ascended so high that all the nations saw it and trembled. This League was formed, it may...

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Red Jacket Monument, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo, New York

Much has been said of the speaking ability of this noted Indian. A good example of one of his famous speeches was one that was delivered to a missionary named Cram who visited the Senecas, in 1805. This missionary requested a council with the Senecas, claiming that he had an important message to deliver to them. When the people had assembled, Cram gave a speech in which he told the Indians that they had never worshipped God in a decent manner but that they and their fathers had been in great darkness and error. He informed them that he...

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Red Jacket Monuments

From the ancient site of Cayuga Castle the Mohawks turned north to the head of the lake. Following the road that once was an Indian trail down the west side of Cayuga Lake, they arrived at Canoga, the site of an ancient Indian village which Indian tradition says was the birthplace of the famous orator Red Jacket. Here on Canoga Creek once stood the village of Skannayutenate, birthplace of Sa-go-ye-wat-ha, the famous Seneca leader. On this ancient village site the warriors saw a monument erected to Red Jacket. The monument contained a picture of a wolf, the clan of Red Jacket and also a tomahawk and pipe. The inscription was as follows: “Red Jacket – Sa-go-ye-wat-ha ‘He Keeps Them Awake’ the orator of the Six Nations of Iroquois – a chief of the Wolf Clan-of the Senecas – born near this spot 1750 – died at Buffalo, N. Y. 1830- erected the by Waterloo Library and Historical Society.” Sa-go ye-wat-ha ‘He Who Causes Them To Be Awake’ is ranked in a volume of American orators as among the greatest in this country. He was born in 1750 at Canoga on Cayuga Lake, N. Y. S. ‘Others claim he was born at the end of Keuka Lake, but Indian tradition says, Canoga was his birthplace.’ He was of the Wolf Clan of the Seneca Nation. As a boy he bore the...

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Monument To Canesque, A Seneca Chief, Naples, New York

At the end of beautiful Canandaigua Lake, one of the Finger Lakes of New York State, in the region of Bare Hill, sacred mountain of the Senecas, rest the bones of an old Seneca Chief. Over his remains stands a stone upon which is the following inscription: “Canesque, Chief of the Senecas at Nundawee Village, who came from the Genesee Reservation in 1794 to die and be buried in his beloved Kiandaga Valley.” As the Mohawks looked at this place they realized that this land, the place from whence the Senecas sprung from Mother Earth, was sacred ground. Heading...

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Monument To Deh-He-Wa-Mis (Mary Jemison) At Letchworth Park, New York

Mary Jemison was taken as a captive by a band of Seneca Indians at March Creek, Pennsylvania in 1776. She was carried down the Ohio River where she was adopted into a Seneca Indian family. In 1759 she moved with the Senecas to the Genesee River Country. She was aged 91 years when she died, Sept. 13, 1833. When offered her freedom, this white woman refused, preferring to live and die with her Seneca People. On one occasion she said, that the life of the old time Indian, before he was given liquor and crowded by the white man, was the happiest life known. She defended her adopted people on many occasions and preferred to be an Iroquois to the end. Over her grave is an impressive monument. It bears the inscription: “To the memory or Mary Jemison, whose home during more than 70 years of a life of strange vicissitude was among the Senecas upon the banks of this river and whose history inseparably connected with that of this valley has caused her to be known as the white woman of the Genesee. Her bones lie beneath this monument.” Near her grave the warriors saw an ancient Seneca Indian Long House.      ...

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Monument to Kaniatario, Handsome Lake, at Onondago Reservation

In 1735 at the Seneca Indian Town of Conawagus on the Genesee River there was born an Indian boy who was later to become one of the greatest Indian Prophets and teachers of recent historical date. This Seneca was later given the office of a chief of the Turtle Clan with the title of Kaniatario or Handsome Lake. As a young man Handsome Lake was everything but a religious teacher. He was a habitual drinker of the white man’s fire water and more than once returned from the towns of the invader under the influence of the white man’s curse. At this time, in spite of the promises of the United States Government to keep the fur traders from bringing rum into Indian towns and in spite of the warnings of the Confederate Chiefs to these same traders, rum was circulated freely among the Iroquois. The Senecas, who had lost most of their country and who were becoming more and more surrounded by the whites, sought to forget their troubles by drinking rum. Under such conditions Handsome Lake lived. Finally, after years of drinking, Handsome Lake became very ill, so ill that for four years he lay an invalid, not able to rise from his bed. At the end of the fourth year he walked from his cabin and fell to the earth, seemingly dead. His daughter immediately told...

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Kaiiontwa-Ken, Cornplanter

Cornplanter known as John O’Bail, was born in the village of Conewaugus sometime around the year 1732. Because of the influence of this chief the Senecas did not join the western Indians as Wayne’s army marched against them. The Senecas, who flanked Wayne’s advance, were in a position to bring about his defeat. Had they thrown their great weight against Wayne, it is very doubtful whether he would have succeeded when he did. Historians say that because Cornplanter prevented his Senecas from falling upon Wayne he rendered the United States a great service. If this chief had been the...

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Grave Of Tenh-Wen-Nyos, Governor Blacksnake, Allegany Reserve

Leaving the monument of Pauline Johnson, the Mohawks headed for the nearby City of Brantford. There in one of the city parks they saw a gigantic monument, said to be the largest in Canada, erected to the Mohawk Chief, Thayendangea. The inscription on this monument was as follows: “The last resting place of Tenh-wen-nyos ‘Awl Breaker’ Governor Blacksnake, born 1737-died 1859-One of the greatest War-Chiefs of the Seneca Nation, warmly espoused the American Cause in struggle of 1776-Devoted his later years to work among his people-Absolutely honest and truthful and enjoying entire confidence of Indian and Paleface, Erected by...

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Witchcraft–Case of Tom. Jemmy

In the spring of 1821, a man belonging to Red Jacket’s tribe, fell into a languishing condition, and after lingering for some time, unable to obtain relief, died. The “medicine men” were unable to divine the cause of his malady; the circumstances of his sickness and death, were thought to be very peculiar, and his friends could discover no better way of explaining the matter, than to suppose he had been bewitched. The Indians believed in sorcery, and at different times in their history had been known to execute summary judgment, on those whom they supposed to be guilty...

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