Topic: Sacs

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Alexander Henry, Esq., who, in the time of Pontiac’s War, fell into the hands of the Huron Indians. Detailing a faithful account of the capture of the Garrison of Michilimacki-Nac, and the massacre of about ninety people. Written by himself. 1Mr. Henry was an Indian trader in America for about sixteen years. He came to Canada with the army of General Amherst, and previous to his being made prisoner by the Indians experienced a variety of fortune. His narrative, as will be seen, is written with great candor as well as ability, and to the discriminating reader needs no encomium. He was living in Montreal in 1809, as appears from the date of his preface to his Travels, which he published in New York that year, with a dedication to Sir Joseph Banks. Ed. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now When I reached Michilimackinac I found several other traders, who had arrived before me, from different parts of the country, and...

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House Document 64

To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled: The undersigned, chiefs, braves, warriors, and hunters, of the Sac and Fox tribes of Indians, beg leave respectfully to represent to your honorable body, that, under the existing law of Congress, regulating the payment of the annuities to our nation, by which they are to be paid to the chiefs, or to some person designated by them, they have been deprived of their just rights as individuals of those tribes, as they verily believe that it was the intention of Congress that every person belonging to our nation should receive an equal proportion of the annuities, and not all be given to a few individuals because they are chiefs, as it was the present year. They further state and declare that they have received no part of the annuities that were paid this year, either in money, clothing, or any thing else; and, as they are solely dependent upon them for a supply of clothing and hunting equipments, it has reduced them to great want. And they are informed by the chiefs themselves that they were sent for to St. Louis, which is about 250 miles from our villages, and 200 from the nearest part of our country, nearly or quite a month earlier than the usual time of paying the annuities, (which,...

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House Document 63

To the honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Congress assembled: The undersigned, chiefs, braves, warriors, and hunters, of the Fox tribe of Indians, beg leave respectfully to represent to your honorable body, that, under the existing regulations respecting the payment of our annuities, we have again been deprived of our just rights as members of the Sac and Fox nation. And in as much as our tribe have always been on terms of peace and friendship with the Government and people of the United States, we make this appeal to your honorable body, in full confidence that our humble petition will be granted. By the last treaty made by the Sacs and Foxs with the Government of the United States, an annuity of twenty thousand dollars, for a term of years, is made and ceded to the Sacs and Foxes, in conjunction for the consideration therein specified; at which time it was distinctly understood by the undersigned that the same was to be equally divided among the whole nation. The undersigned further beg leave to represent, that the Fox tribe, of which they are chiefs, braves, hunters, and warriors, comprise two-thirds of the said nation of Sacs and Foxes; and that they have received but one-half of the said annuities since the treaty of eighteen hundred and thirty-two, (1832) which secures to all...

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Pontiac’s War

Early in the eighteenth century the French had commenced extending their influence among the tribes who inhabited the country bordering on the great western lakes. Always more successful than the other European settlers in conciliating the affections of the savages among whom they lived, they had obtained the hearty good will of nations little known to the English. The cordial familiarity of the race, and the terms of easy equality upon which they were content to share the rude huts of the Indians, ingratiated them more readily with their hosts, than a course of English reserve and formality could...

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