Topic: Revolutionary War

Military History of Keene, New Hampshire

During the period of the Revolution, Keene performed her part faithfully. In 1773 the foot company of Keene numbered 126, under command of Col.. Josiah Willard. The alarm list, numbering forty-five, seems to have been made up of the older men, including many of the original settlers; the selectmen of Keene, David Nims. Eliphalet Briggs, Jr., and Benjamin Hall, reported the following census for Keene : Unmarried men, from sixteen to sixty 65. Married men, from sixteen to sixty 96 Boys, sixteen years and under : 140• Men, sixty years and upwards : 1, Females, unmarried 217 Females, married 105. Widows 10 Male Slave : 1 Total 645 In 1774 the town made preparations for war by the purchase of ” 200 lbs of good gun powder, 400 lbs. of lead, and 1,200 flints,” raising “twenty-four pounds, lawful money” for that purpose. October 17th of that year, Capt. Isaac Wyman and Lieut. Timothy Ellis were chosen delegates to the county congress, at Walpole. The battle of Lexington was fought on the loth of April, 1775. The news reached Keene soon after, and Captain Dorman, in command of the militia, with the advice of Captain Wyman, ” sent expresses to every part of the town,, notifying the inhabitants to meet, forthwith, on the green.” Upon their meeting in the afternoon the citizens voted unanimously to raise a body of men...

Read More

Biography of Robert M. Black

Robert M. Black, the subject of this memoir, came from an ancestry of more than ordinary importance and prominence. His great-grandfather, with his family, removed from Scotland and settled in Virginia some years before the Revolutionary war, caused by the traitor Arnold in portions of Virginia, volunteered, though far past the age of liability, for military service, and was one of the soldiers, who, under Lafayette and Gen. Wayne, turned and drove back Lord Cornwallis. He was intimately acquainted with Lafayette, Gen. Wayne and Gen. Lord Sterling, who were frequent guests at his house. His youngest son, George Black, the grandfather of our subject, was born on the 8th of July, 1767. He was nine years old when the Declaration of Independence was issued. He was a son of the Revolution and saw and caught the spirit of most of the stirring scenes of that eventful period. George Black, with his family, re-moved from Virginia and settled in Kentucky, some time before the war of 1812. He became a soldier of this war in a regiment of mounted rifleman and rendered important service under the command of Gen. Harrison. With such an ancestry, whose character and qualities he reproduced and reflected, together passed through the terrors and excitement with his own individual traits, we may under stand the life of Robert M. Black, who was the ninth in a...

Read More

Pompey Woodward Genealogy

Pompey Woodward, a negro, who did not know his age or parentage, had served in the Revolution as a waiter to some officer. He came to Sullivan, after his second m. He m (1), in Sterling, Mass., Apr. 15, 1788, Rosanna Hendley; both were of Sterling, Probably their last names were those of families where they had been employed. Feb. 16, 1800, he was published to Miss Polly (Mary) Harry of Worcester, Mass. He d. Jan. 13, 1843. In the Sentinel of Feb. 1, 1843, is the following obituary: “In Sullivan, Pompey Woodward, a colored man, aged 77. He had been a professor of religion for a great number of years, and died a Revolutionary pensioner, always maintaining a character for strict integrity, and was highly respected by his neighbors.” Mrs. Polly Woodward d. in Worcester, Mass., July 28, 1856, aged 95, according to the records of Worcester; and the records say she was b. Southboro, Mass. They do not give her parentage or...

Read More

Revolutionary Pension Records Index

This index links to a collection of Revolutionary pension records which includes images of entire pension files for soldiers and sailors who served during the Revolutionary War. These records reveal more details about the veteran’s history and service unlike selected service records chosen for genealogical content. They also contain more specific information about a soldier’s family, state of health, and life after the war.

Read More

James Wilson Genealogy

I. The ancestor of the Daniel2 Wilson family came from Tyrone, Ireland, in 1737, with the famous Scotch Irish emigrants. These emigrants were a hardy, industrious, long-lived, honest and sturdy race of people. A great proportion of New Hampshire’s most distinguished sons are found among their descendants. One of these emigrants was James1 Wilson. The history of Peterborough gives his name as WILLIAM. Later researches favor JAMES, but we are not positively sure of the name. Nor do we know who was his wife. They brought with them from Ireland a son, Robert2, and a daughter, Lettuce2. In this country they had at least two more sons, Daniel2 and James2. Robert2 lived in Peterboro’ and was the father of Anne3 (killed by a log falling from a fence upon her, in childhood), Hon. James3, William3, Anne3 (who m. Jeremiah Swan), Mary3 (who m. Gen. John Steele), Hon. John3 of Belfast, Me., (in the U. S. Congress in 1813-1814), Joseph3 and Sarah3 (m. Hon. John Scott Harrison, son of President William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the U. S. and father of Benjamin Harrison, 23rd President of the U. S.) Hon. James3 Wilson of Peterboro and Keene was the father of Gen. James4 Wilson, the well known lawyer and orator of Keene and a member of the 30th and 31st U. S. Congresses; Col. Robert4 Wilson, who was a well...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Miles Price

Miles Price, of Wales, settled in Lincoln County, N. C., prior to the revolutionary war. He married a Miss Sharp, and had a son named Thomas, who was a soldier of the revolution. He married Isabella Sharp, and they had Elizabeth, Thomas, jr., Reese, Isaac, James, John, Isabella, and Ellen Zohn married Anna Barber, of North Carolina, and they had four children previous to their removal to Missouri, viz.: Elizabeth L., Cynthia, Miles S., and Thomas J. They came to Missouri and settled in Pike County in 1819, after which they had the following children Robert B., John H., Sallie A., Emily I., and Lucinda J. All of his children except Miles S., who is a member of the County Court of Montgomery County, settled in Lincoln County. Mr. Price was Constable and Justice of the Peace in Pike County for thirty years. He was also a great snake killer, and every spring he and his neighbors would have a snake hunt. One spring they killed 9,000 rattlesnakes. Isaac Price first settled in St. Charles County, and afterward in Lincoln. He married Tabitha Wilkerson, of the former...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of James Nowlin

James Nowlin and his wife, Martha Collins, were natives of Scotland. They came to America prior to the revolution, and brought all their household and kitchen furniture with them. They settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed to Pittsylvania County. Their only son, Bryan W. Nowlin, was a Captain in the American army during the revolution. He married Lucy Waide, of Virginia, and they had fifteen children, thirteen of whom lived to be grown, and twelve of them married. The eldest son, Peyton, married Lucy Townsend, and settled first in Kentucky, from whence he removed to Saline County, Mo., previous to 1820, and raised a large family of children. Richard Nowlin, brother of Peyton, married Celie Shelton, and settled first in Kentucky, and afterward in Saline County, Missouri. Samuel Nowlin married Fannie Paul, of Virginia, by whom he had Joseph and David. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Elizabeth Everson, by whom he had two daughters, both of whom are living in Virginia. Joseph Nowlin lived and died in Lynchburg, Va. David studied law at the University of Virginia. In 1835 he married Elizabeth Berger, of Virginia, and the following year he came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where he practiced his profession, and was elected to several official positions in the County, which he filled with...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Poindexter

Joseph Poindexter, of Bedford County, Virginia, was a Captain in the revolutionary war. He married Elizabeth Kenerly, and they had a son, Richard, who married a Miss Ford, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery County in 1837. They had Elizabeth A., Parthena S., Caroline K., Hezekiah F., Eliza, Edward L., Joseph C., James W., John D., and Mary L., most of whom settled in Montgomery...

Read More

Biography of Thomas Sharp

Thomas Sharp was a native of Ireland, but emigrated to America, and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Washington Co., Va. He was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Thomas, Jr., and Benjamin. By his second wife he had but one child, David, who became a Methodist minister, and lived and died in Virginia. Thomas, Jr., settled in Kentucky. Benjamin was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was in Colonel Campbell’s command at the battle of King’s Mountain. He married Hannah Fulkerson, of Virginia, and their children were James F.. John D., Polly C., Jacob L., Catharine E., Attosa P., Hannah D., Peter L , Elvira E., Malinda M., Margaret J., and Benjamin F. In 1816 Mr. Sharp removed to Missouri with all his family except John and Malinda, and settled in (now) Warren County, three miles east of Pinckney. When Montgomery County was organized in 1818, he was appointed Clerk of the County and Circuit Courts and held the position until the State was admitted into the Union. A small log cabin was built in his yard and used as a court house, until the County seat was located at Pinckney, which was named for his daughter, Atossa Pinckney Sharp. Mr. Sharp died at the old Roinstead in 1843; his wife died two years previous. Their son James married Catharine...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Peter Rockafellow

Peter Rockafellow, and old revolutionary soldier, was of German descent. He married the widow McGlathan, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1822. (He lived a short time in St. Louis County, when he first came to Missouri.) He had but one child, Anna, who married Andrew...

Read More

Biography of William B. Rice

William B. Rice was a revolutionary soldier. Previous to his enlistment in the army he accompanied Daniel Boone on one of his expeditions to Kentucky. He married Rebecca Arlington, by whom he had David, William G., Benjamin, Samuel, Callier, and Sophia. Mr. Rice settled in Montgomery County in 1825, and died in his 95th year. His eldest son, David, married Elizabeth Henderson, by whom he had a daughter named Louisa, who married Judge William G. Shackelford, son of John Shackelford, of Virginia. The Judge was left an orphan at four years of age, and was raised by his uncle, Samuel Lawrence, who educated him for a lawyer. He came to Montgomery County in 1835, where he lost his wife, by whom he had six children. He afterward married Anna Rice, daughter of William G. Rice, by whom he had six other children. Judge Shackelford was Judge of the County Court of Montgomery County for twenty-one years. He was a successful farmer, also, but never had a cart or wagon on his place. His corn and other produce were gathered in baskets and carried to the barn.William G. Rice was married first to Mary Vandiver, by whom he had three children. His second wife was Sally Vandiver, by whom he had nine children. Mr. Rice was elected Assessor at a time when the County was in debt, and he made...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Col. John Smith

Col. John Smith, of the revolutionary war, lived in Franklin County, Virginia, here he married Frances Burk by whom he had William, Stephen, John, Wyatt, Henry, Susan, Mary, and Frances William married Elizabeth Ferguson, of Virginia, by whom he had Samuel, Thomas, Stephen, William H., Mary, Frances, Susan, Martha, Elizabeth, Sarah P., and Julia. Mary married Keincol C. Gilbert, who settled in Callaway County. Frances married Colonel Peter Booth of Kentucky: Susan married Colonel F. A. Hancock, who settled in Alabama. Martha married Thomas J. Holland, who settled in Montgomery County in 1832. He represented the County in the State Legislature one term, and was Justice of the Peace in Warren County for a number of years. He died in 1862. Sarah P. Smith married her cousin, Wright Smith, who settled in Warren County in 1837. Julia married John Craighead, who settled in Callaway...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of Thomas Stevens

Thomas Stevens emigrated from England and settled on the James River, 120 miles above Richmond, Va., prior to the revolution. His children were John, William, Susan, Delila, Elizabeth, and Lucy. John married Amanda Thornhill, of Virginia, and they had Thomas, William, Absalom, Elizabeth, Nancy, Susan, and Hope. Thomas was a soldier in the revolutionary war. He married Agnes Perkins, and settled in Missouri in 1826. His children were John, William, Agnes, and Eliza. He was married the second time in Missouri. William, who was a Baptist preacher, was born in May, 1786. He married Frances A. Ferguson, daughter of Dougal Ferguson and Elizabeth Archer, whose father was the third owner of Bermuda Hundreds on James River. William Stevens settled in Montgomery County in 1830. His children were Dougal F., William H., John A., Thomas, Eliza, Mary S., Frances A., and Virginia. Nancy, daughter of John Stephens, married Jacob Maxey, who settled in Montgomery County in 1833. They had William B., Joseph, Redford, Jacob, Elizabeth, Mary, and...

Read More

Biography of Henry Davault

Henry Davault was born in France, but married Catharine Maria Grover, of Germany. They emigrated to America about the year 1764, landed near Philadelphia, and settled near Hanover, York Co., Pa., where they lived and died. Mr. Davault served in the revolutionary war, under General Washington. He died at the age of 85, but his wife lived to the remarkably old age of 97 years, 4 months and ten days. They had the following children Philip, Margaret, Elizabeth and Gabriel (twins), Catharine, Mary, Henry, Valentine, Frederick, Julia, and Jacob. Philip was one year old when his parents arrived in America. He married Catharine Long. Margaret married Samuel Long. Elizabeth married John Kitzmiller. Gabriel married Mary Kitzmiller. Catharine married Nicholas Keefauver. Mary married Martin Kitzmiller. Henry married Kitty Gross. Valentine married Louisa Range. Julia married Jacob Warts. Jacob married Rachel Kitzmiller. Philip Davault had the following children Mary, Kate, Margaret, Lydia, Louisa, Daniel, and Eliza. One of these children married John Harshey, and died in Maryland. Another married William Roberts, and lived in Baltimore. Another married William Landers and lived in Illinois. Another married John Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married Mary Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married James Larrimore, and lived in Ohio. The children of Frederick Davault were Henry, Peter, David, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Louisa, Kitty, and Samuel. Most of these children settled and lived in...

Read More

Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the present town of Danville, where he lived and kept tavern for many years. A Methodist minister named Prescott, stopped at his house one day to get his dinner, and there being no men present he went to the barn to feed his horse. While looking around for the food he saw some large flat gourds, which he supposed to be pumpkins, and fed a lot of them to his horse. After that he was called Gourd Head Prescott. In 1833 Mr. Wright sold his place to Rev. Andrew Monroe, a well known pioneer Methodist preacher, who lived there and kept tavern for some time. Isabella Wright, sister of William Wright, Sr., married John Stone, who settled in Montgomery County in 1818, but afterward removed to...

Read More

Search

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 6,843 other subscribers

It takes a Village to grow a Family Tree!


It takes a village to grow a family tree!
Genealogy Update - Keeping you up-to-date!
101 Best Websites 2016

Recent Comments

Subscribe to AccessGenealogy

Enter your email address to subscribe to AccessGenealogy and receive notifications of new posts and databases by email.

Join 6,843 other subscribers

Pin It on Pinterest