Topic: Revolutionary War

Biographical Sketch of Miles Price

Miles Price, of Wales, settled in Lincoln County, N. C., prior to the revolutionary war. He married a Miss Sharp, and had a son named Thomas, who was a soldier of the revolution. He married Isabella Sharp, and they had Elizabeth, Thomas, jr., Reese, Isaac, James, John, Isabella, and Ellen Zohn married Anna Barber, of North Carolina, and they had four children previous to their removal to Missouri, viz.: Elizabeth L., Cynthia, Miles S., and Thomas J. They came to Missouri and settled in Pike County in 1819, after which they had the following children Robert B., John H., Sallie A., Emily I., and Lucinda J. All of his children except Miles S., who is a member of the County Court of Montgomery County, settled in Lincoln County. Mr. Price was Constable and Justice of the Peace in Pike County for thirty years. He was also a great snake killer, and every spring he and his neighbors would have a snake hunt. One spring they killed 9,000 rattlesnakes. Isaac Price first settled in St. Charles County, and afterward in Lincoln. He married Tabitha Wilkerson, of the former...

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Biographical Sketch of James Nowlin

James Nowlin and his wife, Martha Collins, were natives of Scotland. They came to America prior to the revolution, and brought all their household and kitchen furniture with them. They settled first in the eastern part of Virginia, but afterward removed to Pittsylvania County. Their only son, Bryan W. Nowlin, was a Captain in the American army during the revolution. He married Lucy Waide, of Virginia, and they had fifteen children, thirteen of whom lived to be grown, and twelve of them married. The eldest son, Peyton, married Lucy Townsend, and settled first in Kentucky, from whence he removed to Saline County, Mo., previous to 1820, and raised a large family of children. Richard Nowlin, brother of Peyton, married Celie Shelton, and settled first in Kentucky, and afterward in Saline County, Missouri. Samuel Nowlin married Fannie Paul, of Virginia, by whom he had Joseph and David. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Elizabeth Everson, by whom he had two daughters, both of whom are living in Virginia. Joseph Nowlin lived and died in Lynchburg, Va. David studied law at the University of Virginia. In 1835 he married Elizabeth Berger, of Virginia, and the following year he came to Missouri and settled in Montgomery County, where he practiced his profession, and was elected to several official positions in the County, which he filled with...

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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Poindexter

Joseph Poindexter, of Bedford County, Virginia, was a Captain in the revolutionary war. He married Elizabeth Kenerly, and they had a son, Richard, who married a Miss Ford, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery County in 1837. They had Elizabeth A., Parthena S., Caroline K., Hezekiah F., Eliza, Edward L., Joseph C., James W., John D., and Mary L., most of whom settled in Montgomery...

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Biography of Thomas Sharp

Thomas Sharp was a native of Ireland, but emigrated to America, and settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Washington Co., Va. He was married twice, and by his first wife he had John, Thomas, Jr., and Benjamin. By his second wife he had but one child, David, who became a Methodist minister, and lived and died in Virginia. Thomas, Jr., settled in Kentucky. Benjamin was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and was in Colonel Campbell’s command at the battle of King’s Mountain. He married Hannah Fulkerson, of Virginia, and their children were James F.. John D., Polly C., Jacob L., Catharine E., Attosa P., Hannah D., Peter L , Elvira E., Malinda M., Margaret J., and Benjamin F. In 1816 Mr. Sharp removed to Missouri with all his family except John and Malinda, and settled in (now) Warren County, three miles east of Pinckney. When Montgomery County was organized in 1818, he was appointed Clerk of the County and Circuit Courts and held the position until the State was admitted into the Union. A small log cabin was built in his yard and used as a court house, until the County seat was located at Pinckney, which was named for his daughter, Atossa Pinckney Sharp. Mr. Sharp died at the old Roinstead in 1843; his wife died two years previous. Their son James married Catharine...

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Biographical Sketch of Peter Rockafellow

Peter Rockafellow, and old revolutionary soldier, was of German descent. He married the widow McGlathan, and settled in Montgomery County, Missouri, in 1822. (He lived a short time in St. Louis County, when he first came to Missouri.) He had but one child, Anna, who married Andrew...

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Biography of William B. Rice

William B. Rice was a revolutionary soldier. Previous to his enlistment in the army he accompanied Daniel Boone on one of his expeditions to Kentucky. He married Rebecca Arlington, by whom he had David, William G., Benjamin, Samuel, Callier, and Sophia. Mr. Rice settled in Montgomery County in 1825, and died in his 95th year. His eldest son, David, married Elizabeth Henderson, by whom he had a daughter named Louisa, who married Judge William G. Shackelford, son of John Shackelford, of Virginia. The Judge was left an orphan at four years of age, and was raised by his uncle, Samuel Lawrence, who educated him for a lawyer. He came to Montgomery County in 1835, where he lost his wife, by whom he had six children. He afterward married Anna Rice, daughter of William G. Rice, by whom he had six other children. Judge Shackelford was Judge of the County Court of Montgomery County for twenty-one years. He was a successful farmer, also, but never had a cart or wagon on his place. His corn and other produce were gathered in baskets and carried to the barn.William G. Rice was married first to Mary Vandiver, by whom he had three children. His second wife was Sally Vandiver, by whom he had nine children. Mr. Rice was elected Assessor at a time when the County was in debt, and he made...

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Biographical Sketch of Col. John Smith

Col. John Smith, of the revolutionary war, lived in Franklin County, Virginia, here he married Frances Burk by whom he had William, Stephen, John, Wyatt, Henry, Susan, Mary, and Frances William married Elizabeth Ferguson, of Virginia, by whom he had Samuel, Thomas, Stephen, William H., Mary, Frances, Susan, Martha, Elizabeth, Sarah P., and Julia. Mary married Keincol C. Gilbert, who settled in Callaway County. Frances married Colonel Peter Booth of Kentucky: Susan married Colonel F. A. Hancock, who settled in Alabama. Martha married Thomas J. Holland, who settled in Montgomery County in 1832. He represented the County in the State Legislature one term, and was Justice of the Peace in Warren County for a number of years. He died in 1862. Sarah P. Smith married her cousin, Wright Smith, who settled in Warren County in 1837. Julia married John Craighead, who settled in Callaway...

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Biographical Sketch of Thomas Stevens

Thomas Stevens emigrated from England and settled on the James River, 120 miles above Richmond, Va., prior to the revolution. His children were John, William, Susan, Delila, Elizabeth, and Lucy. John married Amanda Thornhill, of Virginia, and they had Thomas, William, Absalom, Elizabeth, Nancy, Susan, and Hope. Thomas was a soldier in the revolutionary war. He married Agnes Perkins, and settled in Missouri in 1826. His children were John, William, Agnes, and Eliza. He was married the second time in Missouri. William, who was a Baptist preacher, was born in May, 1786. He married Frances A. Ferguson, daughter of Dougal Ferguson and Elizabeth Archer, whose father was the third owner of Bermuda Hundreds on James River. William Stevens settled in Montgomery County in 1830. His children were Dougal F., William H., John A., Thomas, Eliza, Mary S., Frances A., and Virginia. Nancy, daughter of John Stephens, married Jacob Maxey, who settled in Montgomery County in 1833. They had William B., Joseph, Redford, Jacob, Elizabeth, Mary, and...

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Biography of Henry Davault

Henry Davault was born in France, but married Catharine Maria Grover, of Germany. They emigrated to America about the year 1764, landed near Philadelphia, and settled near Hanover, York Co., Pa., where they lived and died. Mr. Davault served in the revolutionary war, under General Washington. He died at the age of 85, but his wife lived to the remarkably old age of 97 years, 4 months and ten days. They had the following children Philip, Margaret, Elizabeth and Gabriel (twins), Catharine, Mary, Henry, Valentine, Frederick, Julia, and Jacob. Philip was one year old when his parents arrived in America. He married Catharine Long. Margaret married Samuel Long. Elizabeth married John Kitzmiller. Gabriel married Mary Kitzmiller. Catharine married Nicholas Keefauver. Mary married Martin Kitzmiller. Henry married Kitty Gross. Valentine married Louisa Range. Julia married Jacob Warts. Jacob married Rachel Kitzmiller. Philip Davault had the following children Mary, Kate, Margaret, Lydia, Louisa, Daniel, and Eliza. One of these children married John Harshey, and died in Maryland. Another married William Roberts, and lived in Baltimore. Another married William Landers and lived in Illinois. Another married John Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married Mary Kitzmiller, and lived in Tennessee. Another married James Larrimore, and lived in Ohio. The children of Frederick Davault were Henry, Peter, David, Mary, Elizabeth, John, Louisa, Kitty, and Samuel. Most of these children settled and lived in...

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Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the present town of Danville, where he lived and kept tavern for many years. A Methodist minister named Prescott, stopped at his house one day to get his dinner, and there being no men present he went to the barn to feed his horse. While looking around for the food he saw some large flat gourds, which he supposed to be pumpkins, and fed a lot of them to his horse. After that he was called Gourd Head Prescott. In 1833 Mr. Wright sold his place to Rev. Andrew Monroe, a well known pioneer Methodist preacher, who lived there and kept tavern for some time. Isabella Wright, sister of William Wright, Sr., married John Stone, who settled in Montgomery County in 1818, but afterward removed to...

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Biography of Stephen Chapman

Stephen Chapman, of England, came to America when he was only fifteen years of age. When the revolution began he joined the American army under Washington, and fought throughout the whole war. After the close of the war, he married Eliza Floyd, of Virginia, by whom he had Frank, George, William, James, John, Andrew, Isaiah, Benjamin, Rachel, and Peggy. Frank was a soldier in the war of 1812. He married Nancy Chester, of Virginia, whose father, Dr. Stephen Chester, was a surgeon in the American army during the revolution. Their children were Sally, Polly A., John W., James B., and Wesley. James B. married Susan Fipps, of Virginia, and settled in Montgomery Co., Mo., in 1838. Mr. Chapman was a cabinet maker by trade, and before he left his home, in Virginia, he made the coffins for the parents of General Joseph E. Johnston, who became so celebrated during the late war between the North and South. After he came to Missouri Mr. Chapman took up the carpenter’s trade, and became one of the most rapid workmen in his part of the country. He possessed great powers of endurance, and on one occasion, while building a house for George Britt, he worked sixty hours without stopping, for which he received $25 in gold. When he first came to Montgomery County there were no roads through the prairies, and the...

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Biographical Sketch of George Gray

George Gray, of Scotland, emigrated to America previous to the revolution, and when that war began he joined the American army and served during the entire struggle. He had several brothers in the British army during the same war. Before leaving Scotland, he married Mary Stuart, and they settled first in Philadelphia, but afterward removed to North Carolina, and from there to Bryan’s Station in Kentucky. Here their son Joseph married Nary Finley, and settled in Warren County, Kentucky. In 1818 he removed to Missouri, and settled on Brush creek in Montgomery County, where he died in 1830. His children were Hannah, William, Isaac, George, Sarah, Rachel, James, and Mary. Hannah married Asa Williams, who was an early settler of Montgomery County. William, Isaac and George married sisters, named Price, of Kentucky. William had three children, who settled in Missouri after the death of their parents. Isaac and George also settled in Montgomery County, but the latter removed to Clark County in 1837, where he still resides. Sarah married Stephen Finley, who settled in Wisconsin in 1846. Rachel married John P. Glover, who settled in Oregon. James married Margaret Williams, of Ohio. Mary married Presley Anderson, who died in 1848, and who was Sheriff of Montgomery County at the time. He left a widow and five children, who still live in Montgomery...

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Biography of David Knox

David Knox was born in Ireland, in 1700. He had a son named Andrew, who was born in 1728. In 1732 Mr. Knox came to America, bringing his little son with him, and settled in Philadelphia County, Pa. Andrew married Isabella White, of Pennsylvania, and they had-Robert, David, Martha, James, John, William, Mary, and Andrew, Jr. Mr. Knox was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and having taken an active part in the events of the day, a reward was offered for him, dead or alive, by the British authorities. On the night of the 14th of February, 1778, he was at home visiting his family, and during the night his house was surrounded by a party of Tories, who had come to capture him for the reward. They announced their presence by firing a volley of balls through the door, and then broke it down with the breeches of their guns. But before they could affect an entrance, Mr. Knox and his son Robert met them with drawn sabers, and laid about them so vigorously that they were soon glad to retreat, with several of their party bleeding from the gashes and cuts they had received. Some American troops in the vicinity were notified of the attack, and immediately started in pursuit. Several of the wounded were captured, as they could be easily traced by the blood on...

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Biographical Sketch of John Hudson

John Hudson and his wife, who was a Miss Allen, lived in North Carolina. They had six sons Isaac, Drury, Thomas, William, John, and Jesse. Drury and Isaac were in the revolutionary war. The latter settled in Georgia, where he married Polly Shipper. He afterward removed to South Carolina, and from thence, to Kentucky, and in 1818 he came to Missouri. The names of his children were Elizabeth, Nancy, Sally, John, Thomas, William, and Charles. Elizabeth married Lemuel Cox. Nancy married Garrett Ingram. Sally married James Owings. John was married three times; first to Lucinda Morris, of Kentucky; second to Nancy Holloway, and third to a widow lady named Carolina W. King. Thomas married Polly Hammond, and settled in Pike County. Charles and William married sisters, and settled in Lincoln County. William’s first wife died, and he afterward married Sarah...

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Biographical Sketch of Isaac King

Isaac King, of Germany, settled in Wythe County, Va., and married Barbara Stroup (late Mrs. Fipps, of Montgomery County, Mo.), by whom he had one son, John P. The latter settled in Montgomery County in 1835, and married Susan Stephenson; a granddaughter of James Heller, of revolutionary fame, and who was at the battle of Bunker...

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