Topic: Quileute

Treaty of July 1, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded by and between Isaac I. Stevens, governor and superintendent of Indian affairs of the Territory of Washington, on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs, headmen, and delegates of the different tribes and bands of the Qui-nai-elt and Quil-leh-ute Indians,on the part of said tribes and bands, and duly authorized thereto by them. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Article 1. The said tribes and bands hereby cede, relinquish, and convey to the United States all their right, title, and interest in and to the lands and country occupied by them, bounded and described as follows: Commencing at a point on the Pacific coast, which is thesouthwest corner of the lands lately ceded by the Makah tribe of Indians to the United States, and running easterly with and along the southern boundary of the said Makah tribe to the middle of the coas trange of mountains; thence southerly with said range of mountains to their...

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Quileute Tribe

Quileute Indians. A Chimakuan tribe, now the only representative of the linguistic stock, whose main seat is at Lapush, at the mouth of Quillaynte river, about 35 miles south of Cape Flattery, west coast of Washington. A small division of the tribe, the Hoh live at the mouth of the river of the same name, 15 miles south of Lapush. Since they have been known to the whites the Quileute have always been few in number, but being of an independent and warlike disposition and occupying an easily defended situation, they have successfully resisted all the attempts of neighboring tribes to dislodge them. Their most active enemies have been the Makah, of Neah bay, and until they came under the control of the United States petty warfare between the two tribes was constant. The Quileute are noted for their skill in pelagic sealing and are the most successful in that pursuit of all the tribes of the coast. They are also daring whalers, but have not attained the proficiency of the Makah. Salmon are caught in considerable numbers and constitute an important article of food. Roots and berries of various kinds are also much used. Although the woods in their vicinity abound with deer, elk, and bear, the Quilteute seem to have hunted them but little and have confined themselves to a seafaring life. There is evidence that a...

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