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Topic: Potawatomi

Treaty of September 29, 1817

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at the foot of the Rapids of the Miami of Lake Erie, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians on the one part; and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Delaware, Shawanese, Potawatomees, Ottawas, and Chippeway tribes of Indians. Article I. The Wyandot tribe of Indians, in consideration of the stipulations herein made on the part of the United States, do hereby forever cede to the United States the lands comprehended within the following lines and boundaries: Beginning at a point on the southern shore of lake Erie, where the present Indian boundary line intersects the same, between the mouth of Sandusky bay and the mouth of Portage river; thence, running south with said line, to the line established in the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, by the treaty of Greenville, which runs from the crossing place above fort Lawrence to Loramie’s store; thence, westerly, with the last mentioned...

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Treaty of January 9, 1789

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a Treaty Made at Fort Harmar, between Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the Territory of the United States North- West of the River Ohio, and Commissioner Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, for removing all Causes of Controversy, regulating Trade, and settling Boundaries, with the Indian Nations in the Northern Department, of the one Part; and the Sachems and Warriors of the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa, Chippewa, Pattawatima and Sac Nations, on the other Part. Article 1. Whereas the United States in Congress assembled, did, by their Commissioners George Rogers Clark, Richard Butler, and Arthur Lee, Esquires, duly appointed for that purpose, at a treaty holden with the Wiandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa nations, at Fort M’Intosh, on the twenty-first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, conclude a peace with the Wyandot, Delaware, Ottawa and Chippewa, and take them into their friendship and protection: And whereas at the said treaty it was stipulated that all prisoners that had been made by those nations, or either of them, should be delivered up to the United States. And whereas the said nations have now agreed to and with the aforesaid Arthur St. Clair, to renew and confirm all the engagements they had made with the United States...

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Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.

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Treaty of September 8, 1815

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A Treaty between the United States of America and the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, Miami, Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie Tribes of Indians, residing within the limits of the State of Ohio, and the Territories of Indiana and Michigan. Whereas the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, tribes of Indians, together with certain bands of the Wyandot, Delaware, Seneca, Shawanoe, and Miami tribes, were associated with Great Britain in the late war between the United States and that power, and have manifested a disposition to be restored to the relations of peace and amity with the said States; and the President of the United States having appointed William Henry Harrison, late a Major General in the service of the United States, Duncan M’Arthur, late a Brigadier in the service of the United States, and John Graham, Esquire, as Commissioners to treat with the said tribes; the said Commissioners and the Sachems, Headmen, and Warriors, of said tribes having met in Council at the Spring Wells, near the city of Detroit, have agreed to the following Articles, which, when ratified by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on them and the said tribes: Article 1. The United States give peace to the Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatimie, tribes....

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Treaty of September 30, 1809

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Putawatimies, Miamies and Eel River Miamies. James Madison, President of the United States, by William Henry Harrison, governor and commander-in-chief of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for treating with the said Indian tribes, and the Sachems, Head men and Warriors of the Delaware, Putawatame, Miami and Eel River tribes of Indians, have agreed and concluded upon the following treaty; which, when ratified by the said President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, shall be binding on said parties. Article 1. The Miami and Eel River tribes, and the Delawares and Putawatimies, as their allies, agree to cede to the United States all that tract of country which shall be included between the boundary line established by the treaty of Fort Wayne, the Wabash, and a line to be drawn from the mouth of a creek called Racoon Creek, emptying into the Wabash, on the south-east side, about twelve miles below the mouth of the Vermilion river, so as to strike the boundary line established by the treaty of Grouseland, at such a distance from its commencement at the north-east corner of the Vincennes tract, as...

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Treaty of June 7, 1803

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by their chiefs and head warriors, and those of the Eel River, Weea, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia by their agents and representatives Tuthinipee, Winnemac, Richerville and Little Turtle (who are properly authorized by the said tribes) of the other part. Article 1. Whereas it is declared by the fourth article of the treaty of Greenville, that the United States reserve for their use the post of St. Vincennes and all the lands adjacent to which the Indian titles had been extinguished: And whereas, it has been found difficult to determine the precise limits of the said tract as held by the French and British governments: it is hereby agreed, that the boundaries of the said tract shall be...

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Treaty of August 21, 1805

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States of America, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Pottawatimies, Miames, Eel River, and Weas. Articles of a treaty made and entered into, at Grouseland, near Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, by and between William Henry Harrison, governor of said territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for treating with the north western tribes of Indians, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delewares, Putawatimis, Miamis, Eel River, and Weas, jointly and severally by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. Whereas, by the fourth article of a treaty made between the United States and the Delaware tribe, on the eighteenth day of August, eighteen hundred and four, the said United States engaged to consider the said Delewares as the proprietors of all that tract of country which is bounded by the White river on the north, the Ohio and Clark’s grant on the south, the general boundary line running from the mouth of Kentucky river on the east, and the tract ceded by the treaty of fort Wayne, and the road leading to Clark’s grant on the west and south west. And whereas, the Maimi tribes, from whom the Delawares derived their claim, contend that...

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Treaty of July 4, 1805

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States of America, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriers of the Wyandot, Ottawa, Chipawa, Munsee and Delaware, Shawanee, and Pottawatami nations, holden at Fort Industry, on the Miami of the lake, on the fourth day of July, Anno Domini, one thousand eight hundred and five. ARTICLE I. The said Indian nations do again acknowledge themselves and all their tribes, to be in friendship with, and under the protection of the United States. ARTICLE II. The boundary line between the United States, and the nations aforesaid, shall in future be a meridian line drawn north and south, through a boundary to be erected on the south shore of lake Erie, one hundred and twenty miles due west of the west boundary line of the state of Pennsylvania, extending north until it intersects the boundary line of the United States, and extending south it intersects a line heretofore established by the treaty of Grenville. ARTICLE III. The Indian nations aforesaid, for the consideration of friendship to the United States, and the sums of money hereinafter mentioned, to be paid annually to the Wyandot, Shawanee, Munsee and Delaware nations, have ceded and do hereby cede and relinquish to said United States for ever, all the lands belonging to said United States, lying east of...

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Treaty of September 26, 1833

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made at Chicago, in the State of Illinois, on the twenty-sixth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three, between George B. Porter, Thomas J. V. Owen and William Weatherford, Commissioners on the part of the United States of the one part, and the United Nation of Chippewa, Ottowa and Potawatamie Indians of the other part, being fully represented by the Chiefs and Head-men whose names are hereunto subscribed—which Treaty is in the following words, to wit: ARTICLE 1. The said United Nation of Chippewa, Ottowa, and Potawatamie Indians, cede to the United States all their land, along the western shore of Lake Michigan, and between this Lake and the land ceded to the United States by the Winnebago nation, at the treaty of Fort Armstrong made on the 15th September 1832—bounded on the north by the country lately ceded by the Menominees, and on the south by the country ceded at the treaty of Prairie du Chien made on the 29th July 1829—supposed to contain about five millions of acres. ARTICLE 2. In part consideration of the above cession it is hereby agreed, that the United States shall grant to the said United Nation of Indians to be held as other Indian lands are...

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Pottawatomie Indian Chiefs and Leaders

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Chechawkose. A Potawatomi chief of this name formerly lived at a village commonly called ” Chechawkose’s village,” on the s. side of Tippecanoe r., about Harrison tp., Kosciusko co., Ind. The reserve was sold in 1836. The name is also spelled Chechawkose and Chitchakos. (J. M.) Shavehead. A well known Pottawatomie chief, so named by the whites because, like many of his ancestors, he kept the hair shaved from the greater part of his scalp. The dates of his birth and death are not known, but lie lived during the early part of the 19th century in the southeast part of Cass County, Mich. As a warrior Shavehead was the terror of the vicinity, feared by both whites and Indians. He participated in many battles and manifested a determined hatred for the whites, openly boasting of the scalps he had taken, and wearing them as trophies about his person. It was reported, although probably with great exaggeration, that he possessed a string of 99 white men’s tongues. Many incidents of Shavehead’s vindictiveness are related. After the mail stages had begun to run on the Chicago road, Shavehead, claiming the rights of his people as proprietors of the soil, established himself at a ferry of St Joseph River, near Mottville, and demanded tribute from every one who...

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Potawatomi Tribe

Potawatomi Indians, Nation of Fire. An Algonquian tribe, first encountered on the islands of Green Bay, Wis., and at its head. According to the traditions of all three tribes, the Potawatomi, Chippewa, and Ottawa were originally one people, and seem to have reached the region about the upper end of Lake Huron together.

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Assegun Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Assegun Indians (probably from Chippewa ŭ’shigŭn ‘black bass.’ W. J.) A traditional tribe said to have occupied the region about Mackinaw and Sault Ste Marie on the first coming of the Ottawa and Chippewa, and to have been driven by them southward through lower Michigan.  They are said, and apparently correctly, to have been either connected with the Mascouten or identical with that tribe, and to have made the bone deposits in northern Michigan. For Further Study The following articles and manuscripts will shed additional light on the Assegun as both an ethnological study, and as a people. Mascouten...

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