Topic: Piankashaw

Agreement of January 3, 1818

Contract entered into under the authority of the United States, between governor Thomas Posey, superintendent of Indian affairs, and Chekommia or Big River, principal chief of the Piankeshaws. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now This indenture, made this third day of January, 1818, between governor Thomas Posey, superintendent of Indian affairs, on the one part, and Chekommia or Big River, principal chief of the Piankeshaw tribe of Indians, acting as well in his own name, as in the name and behalf of the said Piankeshaw tribe of Indians, on the other part, witnesseth: Whereas, at a treaty held under the authority of the United States, with the chiefs and head men of the said Piankeshaw nation of Indians, at Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, the 27th day of August, 1804, and William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian Affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for concluding any treaty or treaties with said tribe, it was agreed by said William Henry...

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Treaty of July 18, 1815

A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded at Portage des Sioux between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Piankishaw Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being anxious of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article I. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article II. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the Piankishaw tribe or nation. Article III. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friendship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract, or agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the said Piankishaw tribe or nation. In witness of all and every thing herein determined between the United States of America, and the said Piankeshaw tribe or nation: we, their...

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Treaty of May 30, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this thirtieth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates representing the united tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria, Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, viz: Kio-kaw-mo-zan, David Lykins; Sa-wa-ne-ke-ah, or Wilson; Sha-cah-quah, or Andrew Chick; Ta-ko-nah, or Mitchel; Che-swa-wa, or Rogers; and Yellow Beaver, they being duly authorized thereto by the said Indians. Article 1. The tribes of Kaskaskia and Peoria Indians, and of Piankeshaw and Wea Indians, parties to the two treaties made with them respectively by William Clark, Frank J. Allen, and Nathan Kouns, commissioners on the part of the United States, at Castor Hill, on the twenty-seventh and twenty-ninth days of October, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, having recently in joint council assembled, united themselves into a single tribe, and having expressed a desire to be recognized and regarded as such, the United States hereby assent to the action of said joint council to this end, and now recognize the delegates who sign and seal this instrument as the authorized representatives of said consolidated tribe. Article 2. The said Kaskaskias and Peorias, and the said Piankeshaws and Weas, hereby cede and convey to the United States, all their right, title, and interest in and to the tracts...

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Treaty of August 7, 1803

At a council holden at Vincennes on the seventh day of August, one thousand eight hundred and three, under the direction of William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian nations north west of the river Ohio, at which were present the chiefs and warriors of the Eel River, Wyandot, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia nations, and also the tribe of the Kikapoes, by their representatives, the chiefs of the Eel River nation. The fourth article of the treaty holden and concluded at Fort Wayne, on the seventh day of June, one thousand eight hundred and three, being considered, the chiefs and warriors of the said nations give their free and full consent to the same, and they do hereby relinquish and confirm to the United States the privilege and right of locating three several tracts of land of one mile square each, on the road leading from Vincennes to Kaskaskia, and also one other tract of land of one mile square on the road leading from Vincennes to Clarksville; which locations shall be made in such places on the aforesaid roads as shall best comport with the convenience and interest of the United States in the establishment of houses of entertainment for the...

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Treaty of December 30, 1805

A treaty between the United States of America and the Piankishaw tribe of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Vincennes, in the Indiana territory, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the said territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the chiefs and head men of the Piankishaw tribe, of the other part. Article 1. The Piankishaw tribe cedes and relinquishes to the United States for ever, all that tract of country (with the exception of the reservation hereinafter made) which lies between the Wabash and the tract ceded by the Kaskaskia tribe, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, and south of a line to be drawn from the north west corner of the Vincennes tract, north seventy eight degrees west, until it intersects the boundary line which has heretofore separated the lands of the Piankeshaws from the said tract ceded by the Kaskaskia tribe. Article 2. The United States take the Piankishaw tribe under their immediate care and patronage, and will extend to them a protection as effectual as that which is enjoyed by the Kaskaskia tribe; and the said Piankishaw tribe will never commit any depredations or make war upon any of...

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Treaty of October 29, 1832

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Castor Hill in the county of St. Louis and State of Missouri, between William Clark, Frank J. Allen, and Nathan Kouns, Commissioners on the part of the United States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors and Counselors, of the Piankeshaw and Wea tribes of Indians, in behalf of their said tribes, of the other part. Article 1.The undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and considerate men, for themselves and their said tribes, for and in consideration of the stipulations hereinafter made, do hereby cede and relinquish to the United States forever, all their right, title and interest to and in lands within the States of Missouri and Illinois-hereby confirming all treaties heretofore made between their respective tribes and the United States, and relinquishing to them all claim to every portion of their lands which may have been ceded by any portion of their said tribes. Article 2.The United States cede to the Piankeshaw and Wea tribes, for their permanent residence, two hundred and fifty sections of land within the limits of the survey of the lands set apart for the Piankeshaws, Weas, and Peorias, bounded east by the western boundary line of the State of Missouri for fifteen miles; north, by the southern boundary of the lands assigned to the Shawanoes; west by lands assigned to the Peorias and Kaskaskias, and...

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Treaty of February 23, 1867

Articles of agreement, concluded at Washington, D. C., the twenty-third day of February, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, between the United States, represented by Lewis V. Bogy, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, W. H. Watson, special commissioner, Thomas Murphy, superintendent of Indian Affairs, George C. Snow, and G. A. Colton, U. S. Indian agents, duly authorized, and the Senecas, represented by George Spicer and John Mush; the Mixed Senecas and Shawnees, by John Whitetree, John Young, and Lewis Davis; the Quapaws, by S. G. Vallier and Ka-zhe-cah; the Confederated Peorias, Kaskaskias, Weas, and Piankeshaws, by Baptiste Peoria, John Mitchell, and Edward Black; the Miamies, by Thomas Metosenyah and Thomas Richardville, and the Ottawas of Blanchard’s Fork and Roche de Boeuf, by John White and J. T. Jones, and including certain Wyandott[e]s, represented by Tauromee, or John Hat, and John Karaho. Whereas it is desirable that arrangements should be made by which portions of certain tribes, parties hereto, now residing in Kansas, should be enabled to remove to other lands in the Indian country south of that State, while other portions of said tribes desire to dissolve their tribal relations, and become citizens; and whereas it is necessary to provide certain tribes, parties hereto, now residing in the Indian country, with means of rebuilding their houses, re-opening their farms, and supporting their families, they having been driven from their reservations...

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Treaty of August 3, 1795

Treaty of August 3, 1795, also known as the Treaty of Greenville. The Treaty of Greenville set a precedent for objectives in future treaties with Native Americans — that is, obtaining cessions of land, advancing the frontier through white settlement, and obtaining more cessions through treaties. With the tribes’ surrender of most of Ohio, settlers began entering in Northwest Territory in greater numbers. In the near future, more treaties would further diminish Indians’ territory. A treaty of peace between the United States of America and the Tribes of Indians, called the Wyandot, Delaware, Shawanoe, Ottawa, Chipewa, Putawatime, Miami, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia.

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Treaty of June 7, 1803

Articles of a treaty between the United States of America, and the Delaware, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miamie, Eel River, Weea, Kickapoo, Piankashaw, and Kaskaskia nations of Indians. Articles of a treaty made at Fort Wayne on the Miami of the Lake, between William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Delawares, Shawanoe, Putawatimie, Miami and Kickapoo, by their chiefs and head warriors, and those of the Eel River, Weea, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia by their agents and representatives Tuthinipee, Winnemac, Richerville and Little Turtle (who are properly authorized by the said tribes) of the other part. Article 1. Whereas it is declared by the fourth article of the treaty of Greenville, that the United States reserve for their use the post of St. Vincennes and all the lands adjacent to which the Indian titles had been extinguished: And whereas, it has been found difficult to determine the precise limits of the said tract as held by the French and British governments: it is hereby agreed, that the boundaries of the said tract shall be as follow: Beginning at Point Coupee on the Wabash, and running thence by...

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Treaty of August 27, 1804

A treaty between the United States of America, and the Piankeshaw tribe of Indians. The President of the United States, by William Henry Harrison, Governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs; and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States, for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian tribes north west of the river Ohio; and the chiefs and head men of the Piankeshaw tribe, have agreed to the following articles, which when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding upon the said parties. ARTICLE I. The Piankeshaw tribe relinquishes, and cedes to the United States for ever, all that tract of country which lies between the Ohio and Wabash rivers, and below Clark’s grant; and the tract called the Vincennes tract, which was ceded by the treaty of Fort Wayne, and a line connecting the said tract and grant, to be drawn parallel to the general course of the road leading from Vincennes to the falls of the Ohio, so as not to pass more than half a mile to the northward of the most northerly bend of said road. ARTICLE II. The Piankeshaw tribe acknowledges explicitly the right of the Kaskaskia tribe to sell the country which they have lately ceded to the United States,...

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The Delaware in Kansas

In 1682, the seat of the Delaware government was at Shackamaxon, now Germantown, Pennsylvania. There Penn found them and made his famous treaty with them. Although extremely warlike, they had surrendered their sovereignty to the Iroquois about 1720. They were pledged to make no war, and they were forbidden to sell land. All the causes of this step were not known. Because of it the Iroquois claimed to have made women of the Delaware. They freed themselves of this opprobrium in the French and Indian War. The steady increase of the whites drove the Delaware from their ancient seat. They were...

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