Topic: Pequawket

The Pequawket Expedition

On April 16, the company bade farewell to their friends and kindred in Dunstable, Mass., the home of many of the party, and proceeded to Contoocook, and to the west shore of Ossipee Lake. Here they halted and erected a fort which should serve as a rallying point and base of supplies. By this time two men had become disabled. One had returned home accompanied by a friend, Benj. Kidder was left at the fort, with the surgeon and a guard of eight. The remaining thirty-four men took up the trail to Pequawket with good courage. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now On Tuesday, two days before the battle, the party were suspicious that they had been discovered by the enemy, and on Friday night the guard heard them creeping through the underbrush about their encampment. At an early hour Saturday morning, May 8th, while they were yet at their devotions, the report of a gun was heard, and soon an Indian was seen standing upon...

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Pequawket Tribe

Pequawket Indians (a name of disputed etymology, the most probable rendering, according to Gerard, being ‘at the hole in the ground,’ from pekwakik). A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living on the headwaters of Saco River and about Lovell’s Pond, in Carroll County, New Hampshire, and Oxford County, Maine. Their principal village, called Pequawket, was about the present Fryeburg, Maine. The tribe is famous for a battle fought in 1725 near the village, between about 50 English under Capt. Lovewell and 80 Indians, the entire force of the tribe, under their chief, Pangus. Both leaders were killed, together with 36 of the English and a large part of the Indian force. By this loss the Pequawket were so weakened that, together with the Arosaguntacook, they soon after withdrew to the sources of Connecticut River. After being there for a short while, the Arosaguntacook removed to St Francis in Canada, while the Pequawket remained on the Connecticut, where they were still living under their chief at the time of the Revolution. Some of them seem to have found their way back to their old home some time after the Lovewell fight. Pequawket Synonmy Pâgwâki. Kendall, Trav., III, 173, 1809 (correct form). Paquakig. Gyles (1726) in Me. Hist. Soc. Coll., III, 358, 1853. Peckwalket. Sullivan in N. H. Hist. Soc. Coll., I, 27, 1824. Peg8akki. French letter (1721) in Mass. Hist....

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