Topic: Nez Percé War

Description of the Battle Monument

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A grateful country has erected on the Big Hole battle field a fitting monument, a modest but enduring shaft of solid granite, which marks the scene of the bloody conflict and tells in mute but eloquent words the story of the victory won there. The base of the monument is five feet six inches square; the pedestal is four feet six inches square by three feet seven inches in height, and the height of the entire structure is nine feet ten inches. On the north face of the shaft are carved the words: Erected By The United States. On the east face the words: On this Field 17 Officers and 138 Men of the 7th U. S. Infantry, under its Colonel, Bvt. Major-General John Gibbon, With 8 Other Soldiers and 36 Citizens, Surprised and Fought all Day A Superior Force Of Nez Percé Indians, More Than One-Third of the Command Being Killed and Wounded. On the south is inscribed : To The Officers and Soldiers of The Army, and Citizens of Montana, Who Fell at Big Hole, August 9, 1877, in Battle With Nez Percé Indians. And on the west side is a list of the soldiers and citizens killed in the action, which is the same as that already quoted from General Gibbon’s report. The...

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Northwestern Fights and Fighters

The Epic of the Nez Percé: Refusing life on a government-selected reservation, Chief Joseph, Chief Looking Glass, Chief White Bird, Chief Ollokot, Chief Lean Elk, and others led nearly 750 Nez Perce men, women, and children and twice that many horses over 1,170 miles through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana mountains, on a trip that lasted from June to October of 1877, until checked by Miles just short of the Canadian border at Bear Paw Mountain (1877). This manuscript depicts their story.

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