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Topic: Nanticoke

Cuscarawaoc Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Cuscarawaoc Indians (place of making white beads – Tooker) . A division of the Nanticoke; mentioned by Capt. John Smith as a tribe or people living at the head of Nanticoke River, in Maryland and Delaware, and numbering perhaps 800 in 1608. Their language was different from that of the Powhatan, Conestoga, and Atquanachuke. Heckewelder believed them to be a division of the Nanticoke, the correctness of which Bozman 1Bozman, Mary land, i, 112-121, 1837 has clearly demonstrated. Consult: For a discussion of the name see: Tooker, Algonquian Series, ix, 65, 1901. (J. M.) Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Bozman, Mary land, i, 112-121,...

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Black-Indian History

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The first black slaves were introduced into the New World (1501-03) ostensibly to labor in the place of the Indians, who showed themselves ill-suited to enforced tasks and moreover were being exterminated in the Spanish colonies. The Indian-black inter-mixture has proceeded on a larger scale in South America, but not a little has also taken place in various parts of the northern continent. Wood (New England’s Prospect, 77, 1634) tells how some Indians of Massachusetts in 1633, coming across a black in the top of a tree were frightened, surmising that; ‘he was Abamacho, or the devil.” Nevertheless, inter-mixture of Indians and blacks has occurred in New England. About the middle of the 18th century the Indians of Martha’s Vineyard began to intermarry with blacks, the result being that “the mixed race increased in numbers and improved in temperance and industry.” A like inter-mixture with similar a results is reported about the same time from parts of Cape Cod. Among the Mashpee in 1802 very few pure Indians were left, there being a number of mulattoes 1Mass Hist. Soc. Coll., r, 206; iv, 206; ibid., 2d s., iii, 4; cf. Prince in Am. Anthrop., ix, no. 3, 1907. Robert Rantoul in 1833 2Hist. Coll. Essex Inst., xxiv, 81 states that “the Indians are said to be...

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Nanticoke Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Nanticoke Indians (from Nentego, var. of Delaware Unechtgo, Unalachtgo, ‘tidewater people’).  An important Algonquian tribe living on Nanticoke River of Maryland, on the east shore, where Smith in 1608 located their principal village, called Nanticoke. They were connected linguistically and ethnically with the Delaware and the Conoy, notwithstanding the idiomatic variance in the language of the latter. Their traditional history is brief and affords but little aid in tracing their movements in prehistoric times. The 10th verse of the fifth song of the Walam Olum is translated by Squier: “The Nentegos and the Shawani went to the south lands.” Although the Shawnee and Nanticoke are brought together in this verse, it does not necessarily indicate that they separated from the main body at the sane time and place; but in both cases the separation appears to have occurred in the region that in verse 1, same canto, is designated Talega land, which was probably in Ohio, since their tradition recorded by Beatty 1Brinton, Lenape Leg., 139, 1885 is precisely the same as that of the Shawnee. It is also probable that “south” in the legend signifies some point below the latitude of Pittsburg, Pa., but not south of the Kanawha. A different and more probable account was given to Heckewelder by the old chief, White, who...

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Black Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Black Indians. Mentioned by Bontemantel and Van Baerlein 1656 (Bontemantel and Van Baerlein, N. Y. Doc. Col. Hist., I, 588, 1856). They and “the Southern Indians, called Minquas,” are spoken of as bringing furs to trade with the Dutch on Schuylkill River. Possibly the Nanticoke, who were said to be darker than their...

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