Topic: Missouri

Treaty of September 26, 1825

For the purpose of perpetuating the friendship which has heretofore existed, as also to remove all future cause of discussion or dissension, as it respects trade and friendship between the United States and their citizens, and the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, the President of the United States of America, by Brigadier-General Henry Atkinson, of the United States’ army, and Major Benjamin O’Fallon, Indian Agent, with full powers and authority, specially appointed and commissioned for that purpose, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs, Head-men, and Warriors, of the said Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, on behalf of their tribe, of the other part, have made and entered into the following articles and conditions, which, when ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall be binding on both parties—to wit: Article I. It is admitted by the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians, that they reside within the territorial limits of the United States, acknowledge their supremacy, and claim their protection. The said tribe also admit the right of the United States to regulate all trade and intercourse with them. Article II. The United States agree to receive the Ottoe and Missouri tribe of Indians into their friendship, and under their protection, and to extend to them, from time to time, such benefits and acts...

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Treaty of December 9, 1854

Article of agreement and convention made and concluded at Nebraska City, in the Territory of Nebraska, on the ninth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, between the United States of America, by George Hepner, United States’ Indian agent, duly authorized thereto, and the chiefs and headmen of the confederate tribes of the Ottoe and Missouria Indians, to be taken and considered as a supplement to the treaty made between the United States and said confederate tribes, on the fifteenth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four. Whereas, by the first article of the treaty in the caption mentioned, it is stipulated that the confederate tribes of the Ottoe and Missouria Indians cede to the United States all their country west of the Missouri River, excepting a strip of land on the waters of the Big Blue River, ten miles in width, and bounded as follows: commencing at a point in the middle of the main branch of the Big Blue River, in a west or southwest direction from old Fort Kearney, at a place called by the Indians the “Islands;” thence west to the western boundary of the country hereby ceded; thence in a northerly course with said western boundary ten miles; thence east to a point due north of the starting point, and ten miles therefrom; thence to the place of beginning. And...

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Treaty of March 15, 1854

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington, this fifteenth day of March, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, as commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named Chiefs of the confederate tribes of the Ottoe and Missouria Indians, viz: Ar-ke-kee-tah, or Stay by It; Heh-cah-po, or Kickapoo; Shaw-ka-haw-wa, or Medicine Horse; Mi-ar-ke-tah-hun-she, or Big Soldier; Cha-won-a-ke, or Buffalo Chief; Ah-hah-che-ke-saw-ke, or Missouria Chief; and Maw-thra-ti-ne, or White Water; they being thereto duly authorized by said confederate tribes. Article 1. The confederate tribes of Ottoe and Missouria Indianscede to the United States all their country west of the Missouri River, excepting a strip of land on the waters of the Big Blue River, ten miles in width and bounded as follows: Commencing at a point in the middle of the main branch of the Big Blue River, in a west or southwest direction from Old Fort Kearney, at a place called by the Indians the “Islands;” thence west to the western boundary of the country hereby ceded; thence in a northerly course with said western boundary, ten miles; thence east to a point due north of the starting point and ten miles therefrom; thence to the place of beginning: Provided, That in case the said initial point is not within the limits of the country hereby ceded,...

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Treaty of September 21, 1833

Articles of agreement and convention, made at the Otoe Village on the River Platte, between Henry L. Ellsworth, Commissioner, in behalf of the United States, and the united bands of Otoes, and Missourias dwelling on the said Platte this 21st day of September A. D. 1833. Article 1.The said Otoes, and Missourias, cede and relinquish to the United States, all their right and title, to the lands lying south of the following line viz.-Beginning, on the Little Nemohaw river, at the northwest corner of the land reserved by treaty at Prairie du Chien, on the 15th July 1830, in favor of certain half-breeds, of the Omahas, Ioways, Otoes, Yancton, and Santie bands of Sioux, and running westerly with said Little Nemohaw, to the head branches of the same; and thence running in a due west line as far west, as said Otoes and Missourias, have, or pretend to have any claim. Article 2.The United States agree, to continue the present annuity of twenty-five hundred dollars, granted by said treaty of Prairie du Chien, to said Otoes and Missourias, ten years from the expiration of the same viz. ten years from 15th July 1840. Article 3.The United States agree to continue for ten years from said 15th July, 1840, the annuity of five hundred dollars, granted for instruments for agricultural purposes. Article 4.The United States agree, to allow annually five...

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Treaty of October 15, 1836

Articles of a convention entered into and concluded at Bellevue Upper Missouri the fifteenth day of October one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six, by and between John Dougherty U. S. agt. for Indian Affairs and Joshua Pilcher U. S. Ind. s. agt being specially authorized therefor; and the chiefs braves head men &c of the Otoes Missouries Omahaws and Yankton and Santee bands of Sioux, duly authorized by their respective tribes. Article 1. Whereas it has been represented that according to the stipulations of the first article of the treaty of Prairie du Chien of the fifteenth of July eighteen hundred and thirty, the country ceded is “to be assigned and allotted under the direction of the President of the United States to the tribes now living thereon or to such other tribes as the President may locate thereon for hunting and other purposes,” and whereas it is further represented to us the chiefs, braves and head men of the tribes aforesaid, that it is desirable that the lands lying between the State of Missouri and the Missouri river, and south of a line running due west from the northwest corner of said State until said line strikes the Missouri river, should be attached to and become a part of said State, and the Indian title thereto be entirely extinguished; but that notwithstanding as these lands compose a part...

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Treaty of June 24, 1817

A treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded between William Clark and Augusta Chouteau, commissioners on the part, and behalf of the United States of America, of the one part; and the undersigned chiefs and warriors, of the Ottoes tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said tribe, of the other part. THE parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe and of being placed, in all things, and in every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composing the said Ottoes tribe, and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war, shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed. Article 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. In witness whereof, the said William Clark and Auguste Chouteau,...

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Treaty of July 15, 1830

Articles of a treaty made and concluded by William Clark Superintendent of Indian Affairs and Willoughby Morgan, Col. of the United States 1st Regt. Infantry, Commissioners on behalf of the United States on the one part, and the undersigned Deputations of the Confederated Tribes of the Sacs and Foxes; the Medawah-Kanton, Wahpacoota, Wahpeton and Sissetong Bands or Tribes of Sioux; the Omahas, Ioways, Ottoes and Missourias on the other part. The said Tribes being anxious to remove all causes which may hereafter create any unfriendly feeling between them, and being also anxious to provide other sources for supplying their wants besides those of hunting, which they are sensible must soon entirely fail them; agree with the United States on the following Articles. Article 1. The said Tribes cede and relinquish to the United States forever all their right and title to the lands lying within the following boundaries, to wit: Beginning at the upper fork of the Demoine River, and passing the sources of the Little Sioux, and Floyds Rivers, to the fork of the first creek which falls into the Big Sioux or Calumet on the east side; thence, down said creek, and Calumet River to the Missouri River; thence down said Missouri River to the Missouri State line, above the Kansas; thence along said line to the north west corner of the said State, thence to the...

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Houses of the Missouri Tribe

In the narrative of the Lewis and Clark expedition appears this record: “June 13, 1804. We passed a bend of the river. Missouri and two creeks on the north, called the Round Bend creeks. Between these two creeks is the prairie, in which once stood the ancient village of the Missouri. Of this village there remains no vestige, nor is there any thing to recall this great and numerous nation, except a feeble remnant of about thirty families. They were driven from their original seats by the invasions of the Sauks and other Indians from the Mississippi, who destroyed at this village two hundred of them in one contest.” 1Lewis and Clark, History of the Expedition under the command of Captains Lewis and Clark. . . Prepared for the press by Paul Allen. Philadelphia, 1814. 2 vols., I, p. 13. About 5 miles beyond they reached the mouth of Grand River which flows from the northwest, serves as the boundary between Carroll and Chariton Counties, Missouri, and enters the left bank of the Missouri River. Therefore the old village of the Missouri evidently stood at some point in the latter county. It was probably composed of a number of mat and bark covered lodges resembling the village of the Osage which stood a few miles farther up the river. Two days later, June 15, the party identified the site...

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Missouri Tribe

Missouri Indians (‘great muddy,’ referring to Missouri river). A tribe of the Chiwere group of the Siouan family. Their name for themselves is Niútachi.

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Tipi and Earth Lodges of the Plains Tribes

One of the most characteristic features of Plains Indian culture was the tipi. All the tribes of the area, almost without exception, used it for a part of the year at least. Primarily, the tipi was a conical tent covered with dressed buffalo skins. A carefully mounted and equipped tipi from the Black-foot Indians stands in the center of the Plains exhibit. Everywhere the tipi was made, cared for, and set up by the women. First, a conical framework of long slender poles was erected and the cover raised into place. Then the edges of the cover were staked...

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Plains Indian Culture

Museum collections cannot illustrate this important phase of culture; but since no comprehensive view of the subject can be had without its consideration, we must give it some space. It is customary to treat of all habits or customs having to do with the family organization, the community, and what we call the state, under the head of social organization. So, in order that the reader may form some general idea of social conditions in this area, we shall review some of the discussed points. Unfortunately, the data for many tribes are meager so that a complete review cannot...

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Hunting and Food of the Plains Tribes

Since this is a discussion of the general characteristics of Plains Indians, we shall not take them up by tribes, as is usual, but by topics, Anthropologists are accustomed to group the facts of primitive life under the following main heads: material culture (food, transportation, shelter, dress, manufactures, weapons, etc.), social organization, religion and ceremonies, art, language, and physical type. Food The flesh of the buffalo was the great staple of the Plains Indians, though elk, antelope, bear and smaller game were not infrequently used. On the other hand, vegetable foods were always a considerable portion of their diet,...

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Industrial Arts of the Plains Tribes

Under this head the reader may be reminded that among most American tribes each family produces and manufactures for itself. There is a more or less definite division between the work of men and women, but beyond that there is little specialization. The individuals are not of equal skill, but still each practices practically the whole gamut of industrial arts peculiar to his sex. This fact greatly increases the importance of such arts when considered as cultural traits. Fire making The methods of making fire are often of great cultural interest. So far as our data go, the method...

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