Topic: Mayflower

Ancestry of Loyed Ellis Chamberlain of Brockton, Massachusetts

Conspicuous on the roll of the representative lawyers of southeastern Massachusetts appears the name of Loyed Ellis Chamberlain. In no profession is there a career more open to men of talent than in that of the law, and in no field of endeavor is there demanded a more careful preparation, a more perfect appreciation of the absolute ethics of life, or of the underlying principles which form the basis of all human rights and privileges. Unflagging application, intuitive judgment, and a determination to utilize fully the means at hand are the elements which insure personal success and prestige in this great calling, which stands as the stern conservator of justice; and it is one into which no one should enter without a recognition of the obstacles to be overcome and the battles to be won, for success does not perch on the falchion of every person who enters the competitive fray, but comes only as the direct and legitimate result of capacity, determinate effort and unmistakable ability. Possessing all the essential qualifications of an able lawyer, Judge Chamberlain, though yet a young man, has attained a commanding position at the bar of Massachusetts and has gained public recognition of a notable order. He has the highest regard for the dignity of his chosen profession, yet he remains entirely unassuming in his intercourse with his fellow men. Descended on both...

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Elmina Ellen Todd Gray of Ashfield MA

GRAY, Elmina Ellen Todd8, (Horace L.7, Lyman6, Asa5, Gershom4, Gershom3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 4, 1864, married Nov. 28, 1888, William Gray, who is a descendant of John and Priscilla Alden both having come to this country in the “Mayflower”. He is a farmer and lived in Ashfield, Mass. Children: I. Lucy Alden, b. Oct. 4, 1889. II. Frank Lyman, b. Jan. 12, 1892. III. Charles Cross, b. July 16,...

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New England Indians

It is lamentable to reflect that in the primitive dealings between the venturous Europeans and aborigines of America, the kindly welcome and the hospitable reception were the part of the savage, and treachery, kidnapping, and murder too frequently that of the civilized and nominally Christian visitor. It appears to have been matter of common custom among these unscrupulous adventurers to seize by force or fraud on the persons of their simple entertainers, and to carry them off as curiosities to the distant shores of Europe. Columbus, with kindly motives, brought several of the West Indian natives to the Spanish...

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