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Letter From Comrade Edson Woodman

Very Interesting Letter From Comrade Edson Woodman, Of Paw Paw, Mich. In January, 1908, accompanied by Mrs. Woodman, I revisited some of the places once familiar to the old 13th Michigan Infantry, and made historic by deeds of daring, by desperate battles, weary marches and suffering, and an outpouring of young lives upon the altar of the country. An absence of over forty-three years had somewhat dimmed my recollection and made some things seem so far away that they became, for the time, but a memory. And I will confess to a swelling of my heart and a tightening of my throat, as they came back to me. We reached Chattanooga in the evening and put up at the Reed House. A large, elegant hotel, which stands where the old Clutch-field House used to be, and early the next morning began looking for old landmarks. The first one was grand Old Lookout Mountain, which in general outline is just as it was when our boys swarmed up its rugged and rocky sides. Electric cars run by the foot of the Mountain, where we takethe cable road to the top. There are two cars on this line, one at each end of a cable that passes around a drum run by steam, at the top, so that when one car goes up the other comes down. This road is 4,750...

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Letters from Miss Collins

No facts in this field can be of more interest to the readers of the Missionary than those contained in the following thrilling account of the conversion of three young Indians in Miss Collins’ mission field. We give the facts as written by this self-sacrificing missionary. Last Sabbath, Mr. Riggs came up from Oahe and we had communion, and there were five children baptized and seven grown people, and seven more were examined and advised to wait till the next communion. It was a most interesting season. Three of the young men were the leaders in the Indian dance. They have always been the head ones in all Indian customs. A year ago, one of them said in the dance that he should follow the Indian customs a year longer—give himself up to them wholly and try to be satisfied, and if he had in his heart the same unsatisfied feeling, the same longing, that he then had, he should throw it all away. On last New Year’s day, the same young man, “Huntington Wolcott,” came to me and said—”Last night I arose in the dance and told them that I had given the old customs and the old Indians a fair trial, and that they did not satisfy, now I should leave them forever and give myself to God, and if any others were ready to follow to...

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Letter from an Indian Chief in Dakota

My Dear Sir:—— Will you Please I have got your letter and I was vey glad—and vey Good letter—and I tell My Indian friends all good men and We are vey glad to see your good paper. And, Now, We Mandans Indian We are maken houses this River south sides and We are farmes And we have Great fields—and We like Vey much the White man Ways—and We are White mans—and We are a Friends to the White, and We hear much talk of you and we are good Indians Mandans. We do not do foolish to the Whites, and We are a good Friends to the Whites——And now I wants to know the Great Fathers Wishes to us. Please good tell me the Great fathers what he say to us—When you get this letter Please Write to me Very soon. Good buy— I am Very your truly friends, MR. WOLFE, Chief. Fort Berthold West, 30 miles from here I live and have 16 acres and I am glad. I have a cow, 6 horses, a wagon, a plow. I have three houses and a store. I live south side this River. Yours, MR. WOLFE, Chief. The Indian Problem A good deal of ingenious ciphering has been done in endeavoring to solve this problem, and, withal, there has been a good deal of honest and efficient work. The Government...

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A Letter About the Green Corn Dance

This letter was written by the late John Howard Payne to a relative in New York, in 1835. The Green-Corn Dance which it describes was, it is believed, the last ever celebrated by the Creeks east of the Arkansas. Soon after, they were removed to the West, where they now are.

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