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Topic: Kickapoo

Western Garrison Life

Grant Foreman describes the early life in a Western Garrison; providing insights on some of the traders in the region, the deaths of Seaton, Armstrong, Wheelock and Izard, all soldiers obviously familiar to him. But he also shares the story of the elopement of Miss Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of General Taylor, to Lieutenant Jefferson Davis… yes, THAT Jefferson Davis.

An interesting section of the chapter are the references to the punishments inflicted upon the soldiers in the event of their disobedience.

Painted by Catlin in 1834, the picture attached is of Clermont, chief of the Osage Tribe. Clermont is painted in full length, wearing a fanciful dress, his leggings fringed with scalp-locks, and in his hand his favorite and valued war-club.

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Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller 1James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April...

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Use Of Tobacco Among North American Indians

Tobacco has been one of the most important gifts from the New World to the Old. In spite of the attempts of various authors to prove its Old World origin there can be no doubt that it was introduced into both Europe and Africa from America. Most species of Nicotiana are native to the New World, and there are only a few species which are undoubtedly extra- American. The custom of smoking is also characteristic of America. It was thoroughly established throughout eastern North and South America at the time of the discovery; and the early explorers, from Columbus on, speak of it as a strange and novel practice which they often find it hard to describe. It played an important part in many religious ceremonies, and the beliefs and observances connected with it are in themselves proof of its antiquity. Hundreds of pipes have been found in the pre-Columbian mounds and village sites of the eastern United States and, although these remains cannot be dated, some of them must be of considerable age. In the southwestern United States the Basket Makers, an ancient people whose remains are found below those of the prehistoric Cliff Dwellers, were smoking pipes at a time which could not have been much later than the beginning of our era.

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The Meeting in 1811 of Tecumseh and Apushamatahah

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now The meeting in 1811, of Tecumseh, the mighty Shawnee, with Apushamatahah, the intrepid Choctaw. I will here give a true narrative of an incident in the life of the great and noble Choctaw chief, Apushamatahah, as related by Colonel John Pitchlynn, a white man of sterling integrity, and who acted for many years as interpreter to the Choctaws for the United States Government, and who was an eye-witness to the thrilling scene, a similar one, never before nor afterwards befell the lot of a white man...

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War With The Modoc – Indian Wars

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Early April 16th, the Modoc had a big fire in their camp. Major Thomas dropped a shell directly into it, provoking a frantic war whoop, and causing the sudden extinguishing of the fire. Another shell was dropped in the same locality, and was followed by yells of pain and dismay. The Modoc then appeared and challenged the soldiers to come out and fight. Another shell was the answer, and they were driven back. At 4 o’clock A. M. , after another fight, the Modoc gave up the attempt...

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Treaty of September 5, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a convention made and concluded, between Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner on the part of the United States, for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. It is agreed, that the annuity secured to the said Tribe, by the Treaty of the thirtieth of August, eighteen hundred and nineteen, shall hereafter be paid to the said Tribe at Kaskaskias, in the state of Illinois. Article II. As the said Tribe are now about leaving their settlements on the Wabash, and have desired some assistance to enable them to remove, the said Benjamin Parke, on behalf of the United States, has paid and advanced to the said Tribe, two thousand dollars, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged; which said sum of two thousand dollars, is to be considered as an equivalent, in full, for the annuity due the said Tribe, by virtue of the aforesaid Treaty, for the year eighteen hundred and twenty-one. In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, commissioner as aforesaid, and the chiefs, warriors, and head men, of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at Vincennes, the fifth day of September, eighteen hundred and twenty. B. Parke Wagohaw, his x mark...

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Treaty of July 19, 1820

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty made and concluded by, and between, Auguste Chouteau and Benjamin Stephenson, Commissioners of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part, and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors, of the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Nation, of the other part, the same being supplementary to, and amendatory of, the Treaty made and concluded at Edwardsville, on the 30th July, 1819, between the United States and the said Kickapoo nation. Article I. It is agreed, between the United States and the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, that the sixth article of the treaty, to which this is supplementary, shall be, and the same is hereby, altered and amended, so as to read as follows, viz: In consideration of, and exchange for, the cession made by the aforesaid tribe, in the first article of this treaty, the United States, in addition to three thousand dollars worth of merchandise, this day paid to the said tribe, hereby cede to the said tribe, to be by them possessed in like manner as the lands, ceded by the first article of this treaty by them to the United States, were possessed, a certain tract of land in the territory of Missouri, and included within...

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Treaty of August 30, 1819

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty made and concluded by Benjamin Parke, a commissioner on the part of the United States of America, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. The Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, agree to cede, and hereby relinquish, to the United States, all the lands which the said tribe has heretofore possessed, or which they may rightfully claim, on the Wabash river, or any of its waters. Article II. And to the end that the United States may be enabled to fix with the other Indian tribes a boundary between their respective claims, the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the said tribe, do hereby declare, that their rightful claim is as follows, viz: beginning at the northwest corner of the Vincennes tract; thence, westward, by the boundary established by treaty with the Piankeshaws, on the thirtieth day of December, eighteen hundred and five, to the dividing ridge between the waters of the Embarras and the Little Wabash; thence, by the said ridge, to the source of the Vermilion river; thence, by the same ridge, to the head of Pine creek; thence, by the said creek, to the Wabash river; thence, by the said...

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Treaty of September 2, 1815

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty of peace and friendship, made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of the one part; and the undersigned Chiefs, Warriors, and Deputies, of the Kickapoo Tribe or Nation, on the part and behalf of the said Tribe or Nation, of the other part. The parties being desirous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and the said tribe or nation, and of being placed in all things, and in every respect, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war, have agreed to the following articles: Article 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the contracting parties towards the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgot. Article 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America, and all the individuals composing the said Kickapoo tribe or nation. Article 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige themselves, reciprocally, to deliver up all the prisoners now in their hands (by what means so ever the same may have come into their possession) to the officer commanding at Fort Clarke, on the Illinois river, to...

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Treaty of June 4, 1816

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and entered into at Fort Harrison, in the Indiana Territory between Benjamin Parke, specially authorized thereto by the president of the United States, of the one part, and the tribes of Indians called the Weas and Kickapoos, by their chiefs and head men, of the other part. Article I. The Weas and Kickapoos again acknowledge themselves in peace and friendship with the United States. Article II.The said tribes acknowledge the validity of, and declare their determination to adhere to, the treaty of Greenville, made in the year seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and all subsequent treaties which they have respectively made with the United States. Article III. The boundary line, surveyed and marked by the United States, of the land on the Wabash and White rivers, ceded in the year eighteen hundred and nine, the said tribes do hereby explicitly recognize and confirm, as having been executed conformably to the several treaties they have made with the United States. Article IV. The chiefs and warriors of the said tribe of the Kickapoos acknowledge that they have ceded to the United States all that tract of country which lies between the aforesaid boundary line on the north west side of the Wabash-the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from...

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Kansas Land Patents – Kickapoo Tribe

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Patentee NameDateDoc. #Acession # CADUE, MITCHELL 12/13/1915 543483 503256 FOX, CORA RULEAU 11/11/1912 275270 300115 KE WA DNO QUAH 06/24/1909 44886-09 68914 MAS-QUOS, SUSAN 05/19/1910 10485-10 131341 P-KISH-NO-QUA 09/24/1915 436925 491272 ROUBIDOUX, ROBERT 01/21/1909 197495-08 41819 SA-SA-KAH 05/23/1912 233639 268579 WAN-BE-QUAH 05/19/1910 10485-10 131341 ZOZETTE 02/18/1909 13272-09...

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Treaty of June 28, 1862

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the agency of the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, on the 28th day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, by and between Charles B. Keith, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the undersigned chiefs, headmen, and delegates of the Kickapoo Nation, on behalf of said nation. Article 1.The Kickapoo tribe of Indians, believing that it will contribute to the civilization of their people to dispose of a portion of their present reservation in Kansas, consisting of one hundred and fifty thousand acres of land, to allot land in severalty to those members of said tribe who desire to have separate tracts of lands, and have adopted the customs of the whites, and to set apart for the others of said tribe a portion of said reservation, to be held by them in common, or (if a majority of them so elect) provide for them a suitable home elsewhere, to be held by them in common, it is therefore hereby agreed that the Secretary of the Interior shall cause the whole of said reservation to be surveyed in the same manner as the public lands are surveyed, and the quantity of land hereinafter mentioned to be set apart to...

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Treaty of May 18, 1854 – Kickapoo

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the city of Washington this eighteenth day of May, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates of the Kickapoo tribe of Indians, viz: Pah-kah-kah or John Kennekuk, Kap-i-o-mah or the Fox Carrier, No-ka-wat or the Fox Hair; Pe-sha-gon or Tug made of Bear Skin, and Ke-wi-sah-tuk or Walking Bear or Squire, thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Kickapoo tribe of Indians hereby cede, sell, and convey unto the United States all that country southwest of the Missouri River, which was provided as a permanent home, for them in the treaty of Castor Hill, of the twenty-fourth of October, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, and described in the supplemental article thereto, entered into at Fort Leavenworth, on the 26th of November, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two, as follows: Beginning “on the Delaware line, where said line crosses the left branch of Salt Creek, thence down said creek to the Missouri River, thence up the Missouri River thirty miles when measured on a straight line, thence west-wardly to a point twenty miles from the Delaware line, so as to include in the lands assigned to the Kickapoos, at least...

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Treaty of August 7, 1803

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now At a council holden at Vincennes on the seventh day of August, one thousand eight hundred and three, under the direction of William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory, superintendent of Indian affairs, and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for concluding any treaty or treaties which may be found necessary with any of the Indian nations north west of the river Ohio, at which were present the chiefs and warriors of the Eel River, Wyandot, Piankashaw and Kaskaskia nations, and also the tribe of the Kikapoes, by their representatives, the chiefs of the Eel River nation. The fourth article of the treaty holden and concluded at Fort Wayne, on the seventh day of June, one thousand eight hundred and three, being considered, the chiefs and warriors of the said nations give their free and full consent to the same, and they do hereby relinquish and confirm to the United States the privilege and right of locating three several tracts of land of one mile square each, on the road leading from Vincennes to Kaskaskia, and also one other tract of land of one mile square on the road leading from Vincennes to Clarksville; which locations shall be made in such places on the aforesaid roads as shall best comport with the convenience and interest...

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Treaty of December 9, 1809

Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. Start Now A treaty between the United States of America and the Kickapoo tribe of Indians. William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana territory and commissioner plenipotentiary of the United States for treating with the Indian tribes north west of the Ohio, and the Sachems and war chiefs of the Kickapoo tribe, on the part of said tribe, have agreed on the following articles, which, when ratified by the President, by and with the advice of the Senate, shall be binding on said parties. Article 1. The ninth article of the treaty concluded at Fort Wayne on the thirtieth of September last, and the cession it containes is hereby agreed to by the Kickapoos, and a permanent additional annuity of four hundred dollars, and goods to the amount of eight hundred dollars, now delivered, is to be considered as a full compensation for the said cession. Article 2. The said tribe further agrees to cede to the United States all that tract of land which lies between the tract above ceded, the Wabash, the Vermillion river, and a line to be drawn from the North corner of the said ceded tract, so as to strike the Vermilion river at the distance of twenty miles in a direct line from its mouth. For this cession a further annuity of...

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